Museum Conservation Institute

Aerial View of Museum Support Center, Suitland, MD, by Tinsley, Jeff, 1983, Smithsonian Archives - History Div, 83-3821.
Aerial View of Museum Support Center, Suitland, MD
Tony Konrad Conserves 1679 Painting, by Unknown, 1976, Smithsonian Archives - History Div, 76-7177-8A.
Tony Konrad Conserves 1679 Painting
Conservation Analytical Laboratory Research, by Dougherty, Harold E, 1992, Smithsonian Archives - History Div, 96-20063.
Conservation Analytical Laboratory Research
Museum Conservation Institute, by DeLoreto, James, December 9, 2006, Smithsonian Archives - History Div, 2006-4517.
Museum Conservation Institute

Robert M. Organ and Philip Lundeburg, by Hofmeister, Richard K, 1978, Smithsonian Archives - History Div, 78-245-22.A Conservation Research Laboratory was first established in 1963 under the direction of the Smithsonian’s U.S. National Museum. In 1964, the laboratory was moved to new quarters in the Museum of History and Technology, now the National Museum of American History. In 1966, the laboratory was renamed the Conservation Analytical Laboratory. The laboratory began its work by focusing narrowly on preservation and restoration. However, over time its focus broadened so that it became involved in the study and treatment of collections; providing data for understanding museum collections; and supporting, training, and education for Smithsonian and non-Smithsonian conservation staff.

Mark McCormick-Goodhart, by Dougherty, Harold E, 1994, Smithsonian Archives - History Div, SIA2011-1199.In 1987, at the urging of former Senator Claiborne Pell of Rhode Island, legislation establishing a Museum Support Center at the Smithsonian also created a center for museum object conservation, research, and training. The center was renamed the Smithsonian Center for Materials Research and Education, and moved to the Museum Support Center after it opened in 1983.

Charles Tumosa and Marion Mecklenburg, by Dougherty, Harold E, 1991, Smithsonian Archives - History Div, SIA2011-1102.The center specializes in two scientific pursuits: conservation science, which analyzes objects and their materials to determine suitable conservation treatment; and archaeometry, which aims to integrate scientific analysis of objects with their anthropological, archaeological, art historical, and cultural backgrounds. In 2006, the center was renamed the Museum Conservation Institute to reflect its focus on conducting research, and providing information and recommendations about object condition and care to the Smithsonian’s nineteen museums.

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Today in Smithsonian History

Franklin Printing Press, by Unknown, c. 1890s, Smithsonian Archives - History Div, SIA2010-2429 or 17539-B or MAH-17539B.

April 23, 1900

The United States Congress authorizes the Secretary of the Smithsonian, at his discretion, to exhibit the old Ben Franklin printing press and other articles from the United States National Museum of interest to the printing trades at the New York Printing Exposition to be held from May 2 to June 2, 1900.More

Did you know...

That Museum Conservation Institute staff use a plethora of cutting-edge techniques, including the isotope ratio mass spectroscopy, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and structured 3-D color scanning of objects?

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