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Postcard of the Smithsonian Institution Castle
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Grayscale Postcard of the National Museum #4
Postcard of "The Wedding Procession of Prince Dara-Shikoh"
Postcard of The Wedding Procession of Prince Dara-Shikoh
Postcard of the U.S. Capitol at Night
Postcard of the US Capitol at Night
Palace of Fine Arts Postcard from the Panama-Pacific Exposition
Postcard of the Palace of Fine Arts
RSVP Postcard for "En Pointe" Exhibit
RSVP Postcard for the En Pointe Exhibit
Postcard of the Patent Office Building #2017, c. 1898-1901, Unknown creator, Courtesy of a private collector, No copy available at the Smithsonian Institution Archives
Postcard of the Patent Office Building #2017, c. 1898-1901, Unknown creator, Courtesy of a private collector, No copy available at the Smithsonian Institution Archives
Postcard of "Apples of Nadorp on Registered Cover"
Postcard of Apples of Nadorp on Registered Cover
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Postcard of the New National Museum #1500

Today in Smithsonian History

"The Mediator", c. 1855, Smithsonian Archives - History Div, img0039_hires.

August 29, 1838

James Smithson's legacy, in the form of British gold sovereigns packed in eleven boxes, as well as his personal effects, arrive with Richard Rush on the ship "Mediator" in the harbor of New York. The personal effects are deposited with the collector of the Port of New York on September 1. The gold is immediately deposited with the Bank of America, until September 1, when it is transferred to the Treasurer of the United States Mint in Philadelphia. The £104,960 and 8 shillings, 6 pence in gold sovereigns is melted down and reminted into United States coins worth $508,318.46. Smithson's personal effects remain in New York until June 1841, when the National Institute requests they be sent to Washington.More

Did you know...

That the Arts and Industries Building was the first building built to be the National Museum of the United States?

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