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Finding Aids to Personal Papers and Special Collections in the Smithsonian Institution Archives

Record Unit 7134

Casey, Thos. L. (Thomas Lincoln), 1857-1925

Thomas Lincoln Casey Papers, 1870-1871, 1873, 1881-1897

Repository: Smithsonian Institution Archives, Washington, D.C. Contact us at osiaref@si.edu.
Creator: Casey, Thos. L. (Thomas Lincoln), 1857-1925
Title: Thomas Lincoln Casey Papers
Dates: 1870-1871, 1873, 1881-1897
Quantity: 1.25 cu. ft. (2 document boxes) (1 half document box)
Collection: Record Unit 7134
Language of Materials: English
Summary:

These papers concern Casey's work in entomology, especially the creation of his collection of Coleoptera. A fragment of the papers relates to Casey's earlier work in astronomy. Included in the papers are letters from Casey's father, 1870-1871; observations and computations made while accompanying Simon Newcomb on an expedition to observe the transit of Venus, 1882; letters received from entomologists, 1887-1897, regarding specimen identifications, purchase and exchange of Coleoptera specimens, and relating to the publication of Casey's papers; an autograph collection, mostly of public or military figures; and drawings of fossil Diatomaceae done by Casey in 1873.

Historical Note

Thomas Lincoln Casey (1857-1925) graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1879 and went into the Corps of Engineers. In his early years in the military he was engaged in astronomy, but his interest later turned to entomology, and he became an intense student of the Coleoptera. His first paper appeared in 1884. At first his study was confined to North America, but after 1910 he studied the Coleoptera of Central and South America as well. His collection of specimens and his library were given to the United States National Museum after his death. See Thomas Lincoln Casey and the Casey Collection of Coleoptera, Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, Volume 94, Number 3, publication 3330.

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Introduction

This finding aid was digitized with funds generously provided by the Smithsonian Institution Women's Committee.

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Descriptive Entry

These papers concern Casey's work in entomology, especially the creation of his collection of Coleoptera. A fragment of the papers relates to Casey's earlier work in astronomy. Included in the papers are letters from Casey's father, 1870-1871; observations and computations made while accompanying Simon Newcomb on an expedition to observe the transit of Venus, 1882; letters received from entomologists, 1887-1897, regarding specimen identifications, purchase and exchange of Coleoptera specimens, and relating to the publication of Casey's papers; an autograph collection, mostly of public or military figures; and drawings of fossil Diatomaceae done by Casey in 1873.

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This collection is indexed under the following access terms. These are links to collections with related topics, persons or places.

Name

Subject

Physical Characteristics of Materials in the Collection

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Preferred Citation

Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7134, Thomas Lincoln Casey Papers

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Container List

Box 1

Diary and Keys to Locations, 1881-1885. A bound volume used for three purposes at different times: 1) Diary of entomological work, 1884-1885, relating to specimens collected and examined in other collections, including some references to locations; 2) Keys to locations; 3) Data and computations relating to astronomical observations, 1881-1882, while accompanying Simon Newcomb on his expedition to the Cape of Good Hope to observe the transit of Venus.

Box 1 of 3

Miscellaneous Unidentified Notes

Box 1 of 3

Entomological Notes and Drafts of Letters and Papers

Box 1 of 3

Box 2

Incoming Correspondence, 1887-1897. Letters received by Casey relating to entomological work, especially the building of his collection of Coleoptera; includes correspondence from noted entomologists regarding determination of specimens and exchange or sale of specimens; letters from Theodore D. A. Cockerell giving Casey advice on collecting methods, especially concerning location data; correspondence regarding disputes with George Horn; and "An Explanatory Chapter" in manuscript by Casey, consisting of an explanation of the dispute with Horn. Correspondents for whom there is substantial correspondence include Theodore D. A. Cockerell, Henry Clinton Fall, James Fletcher, Carl Fuchs, P. Jerome Schmitt, David Sharp, Henry Ulke, and Henry Frederick Wickham.

Box 2 of 3

Letters from Casey's Father, 1870-1871, Department of Entomology

Box 2 of 3

Autograph Cards, Department of Entomology

Box 2 of 3

Box 3

Photographs, Certificates and Diplomas, and Biographical Information

Box 3 of 3