Roy Clarke and the Mundrabilla, Western Australian Meteorite

ID: SIA2011-0765 and 75-3446

Creator: Clarke, Roy S., Jr

Form/Genre: Photographic print

Date: 1975

Citation: Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9622, Box 1, Folder: Roy Clarke Oral History

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Summary

Roy S. Clarke is kneeling beside the meteor Mundrabilla (named for the town in Western Australia where it was located in 1966). Clarke, curator in the Department of Mineral Sciences, National Museum of Natural History, went to Heidelberg to receive the large Mundrabilla slice and research that had been prepared at the Max Planck Institute in June1973. Here Clarke examines the slice's structural features while final adjustments are being made and a plastic cover is put in place for the specimen's exhibition at the Museum of Natural History.

Subject

  • Clarke, Roy S., Jr
  • National Museum of Natural History (U.S.) Division of Meteorites
  • National Museum of Natural History (U.S.)
  • National Museum of Natural History (U.S.) Dept. of Mineral Sciences
  • Max-Planc Institute

Category

Historic Images of the Smithsonian

Notes

During a geological survey of a portion of the Eucla Basin in Western Australia, two large iron meteorites were discovered in 1966. The two principal masses, lying some 600 ft. apart, were located on the Nullarbor Plain. The smaller of the two was shipped to Germany to the Max Planck Institute for cutting.

Contained within

Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9622, Box 1, Folder: Roy Clarke Oral History

Contact information

Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu

Date

1975

Restrictions & Rights

No restrictions

Topic

  • Personnel management
  • Employees
  • Meteorites
  • Exhibitions
  • Smithsonian Institution
  • Specimens
  • Meteorites, Iron
  • Smithsonian Institution--Employees

Form/Genre

  • Photographic print
  • Object
  • Person, candid

ID Number

SIA2011-0765 and 75-3446

Physical description

Number of Images: 1 Color: Black and white Size: 10w x 8h Type of Image: Person, candid; object Medium: Photographic print

Full Record

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