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Finding Aids to Records of Professional Societies in the Smithsonian Institution Archives

Accession 18-094

Science Service

Records, circa 1920s-1970s

Repository: Smithsonian Institution Archives, Washington, D.C. Contact us at osiaref@si.edu.
Creator: Science Service
Title: Records
Dates: circa 1920s-1970s
Quantity: 19 cu. ft. (38 document boxes)
Collection: Accession 18-094
Language of Materials: English
Summary:

Science Service was established in 1920 through the efforts of the E. W. Scripps Company in collaboration with the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), and the National Research Council (NRC). In 1919 Scripps had established the American Society for the Dissemination of Science. Unknown to Scripps, the three major scientific organizations were trying to agree on a format and establish a popular science journal. In 1920 Scripps met with representatives of the AAAS, NAS, and NRC in an attempt to pool resources. Out of that meeting came Science Service, a news service designed to popularize science and to disseminate scientific knowledge. This accession consists of Science Service files that were given to and maintained by the Division of Electricity and Modern Physics (E&MP), National Museum of American History (NMAH), which later became part of the Division of Information Technology and Society and then Division of Work and Industry after that. The files in this collection relate specifically to the subject of electricity. Also covered and related to the subject area of electricity are automobiles, batteries, camera, communications, electric circuits, electric generators, lighting, electric machinery, electric power plants, electric power transmission, electrical engineering, electromagnets, electron microscope, fuel cells, integrated circuits, lasers, phonographs, radio, radio transmission, telephones, and television. Materials include correspondence and memoranda, photographs, news releases, and clippings. Some subjects are listed but the envelopes are missing. A select number of images were digitized and appeared on a Science Service website created and maintained by Nance L. Briscoe, Collections Manager, and later by Harold D. Wallace, Curator, Division of Work and Industry, NMAH. The site has been taken down by NMAH but can still be accessed through Accession 14-071: National Museum of American History, Website Records, 2008-2013, Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Descriptive Entry

Science Service was established in 1920 through the efforts of the E. W. Scripps Company in collaboration with the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), and the National Research Council (NRC). In 1919 Scripps had established the American Society for the Dissemination of Science. Unknown to Scripps, the three major scientific organizations were trying to agree on a format and establish a popular science journal. In 1920 Scripps met with representatives of the AAAS, NAS, and NRC in an attempt to pool resources. Out of that meeting came Science Service, a news service designed to popularize science and to disseminate scientific knowledge.

This accession consists of Science Service files that were given to and maintained by the Division of Electricity and Modern Physics (E&MP), National Museum of American History (NMAH), which later became part of the Division of Information Technology and Society and then Division of Work and Industry after that. The files in this collection relate specifically to the subject of electricity. Also covered and related to the subject area of electricity are automobiles, batteries, camera, communications, electric circuits, electric generators, lighting, electric machinery, electric power plants, electric power transmission, electrical engineering, electromagnets, electron microscope, fuel cells, integrated circuits, lasers, phonographs, radio, radio transmission, telephones, and television. Materials include correspondence and memoranda, photographs, news releases, and clippings. Some subjects are listed but the envelopes are missing. A select number of images were digitized and appeared on a Science Service website created and maintained by Nance L. Briscoe, Collections Manager, and later by Harold D. Wallace, Curator, Division of Work and Industry, NMAH. The site has been taken down by NMAH but can still be accessed through Accession 14-071: National Museum of American History, Website Records, 2008-2013, Smithsonian Institution Archives.

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Preferred Citation

Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 18-094, Science Service, Records

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Container List

Box 1

Subject 1 - Automobiles

E&MP 1.001: Electric truck - "Voltswagon," 1965 (Boyertown photo ID X-488)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.002: Inside of an electric truck, "Voltswagon," also called "Battronic" circa 1965 (Copyright: Boyertown Multalloy Truck Bodies)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.003: An unmarked Battronic Truck, circa 1965 (Boyertown photo ID x-487, Copyright: Boyertown Multalloy Truck Bodies)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.003a: A "Pearce, Dairy Products, Quality Chekd," electronic truck, "Voltswagon," circa 1965 (Boyertown photo ID X-487, Copyright: Boyertown Multalloy Truck Bodies)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.003b: A "Pearce, Dairy Products, Quality Chekd," electronic truck with battery compartment door open, "Voltswagon," circa 1965 (Boyertow photo ID X-488, Copyright: Boyertown Multalloy Truck Bodies)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.004: An unmarked Battronic truck, circa 1965 (Boyertown photo ID W-260, Copyright: Boyertown Multalloy Truck Bodies)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.005: A marked Battronic truck for Pearce Dairy Products, Quality Checked, circa 1965 (Boyertown photo ID X-489, Copyright: Boyertown Multalloy Truck Bodies)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.006: A marked Battronic truck for Potomac Edison, circa 1965 (Boyertown photo ID V-837, Copyright: Boyertown Multalloy Truck Bodies)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.007: A marked Battronic truck for Sealtest Milk, circa 1965 (Boyertown photo ID W-632, Copyright: Boyertown Multalloy Truck Bodies)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.008: A marked Battronic truck for AMERICAN INSTITUTE Fabric Care Services, Joliet, ILL, circa 1965 (Boyertown photo ID W-633, Copyright: Boyertown Multalloy Truck Bodies)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.009: A marked Battronic truck for AMERICAN INSTITUTE Fabric Care Services, Joilet, ILL, circa 1965 (Boyertown photo ID W-664, Copyright: Boyertown Multalloy Truck Bodies)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.010: An unmarked Battronic truck, with view of the battery in its compartment, circa 1965 (Boyertown photo ID V-815, Copyright: Boyertown Multalloy Truck Bodies)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.011: An unmarked Battronic truck, view of the interior driver's compartment, circa 1965 (Boyertown photo ID X-492, Copyright: Boyertown Multalloy Truck Bodies)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.012: An unmarked Battronic truck, also with a chassis with electric battery compartments, circa 1965 (Boyertown photo ID V-549, Copyright: Boyertown Multalloy Truck Bodies)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.013: An unmarked Battronic truck, showing electrical hook-up of truck, circa 1965 (Boyertown photo ID V-816, Copyright: Boyertown Multalloy Truck Bodies)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.014: An unmarked Battronic truck, with view of the battery in its compartment, circa 1965 (Boyertown photo ID W-391, Copyright: Boyertown Multalloy Truck Bodies)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.015 (CD2055001): Voltswagon - Electric truck is ahead of the electric passenger car in its development and use. Made by the Battronic Truck Corporation, Philadelphia, this truck is already in use by dairies and laundries in the Philadelphia area. Similar trucks compete satisfactorily with traffic in many English and Canadian cities, but are being equipped with American-designed bodies. December 29, 1965. (Original caption by Science Service, Science Service no. 13657, Copyright - Potomac Edison System)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.016 (CD2055002): Electric truck - A new electric is expected on the market soon, and a little imagination can picture the completed job, including a housewife in an advertisement to show how any family can have a "second" car for less than $1,000. This one is expected to run 35 miles an hour, ideal for suburban driving. Not least in its assets is the lessening of air pollution. December 12, 1965. (Original caption by Science Service, Science Service no. 13658)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.017 (CD2055003): Electric truck - Sodium-Sulfur Battery. Ford Motor Company has demonstrated a major breakthrough in its efforts to develop a feasible power source for electric vehicles. Developed by Drs. Neil Weber (left) and Joseph T. Kummer, shown with an operating cell and a model of a 2,000 watt unit, the new sodium-sulfur battery system should be able to store up to fifteen times the amount of electrical energy available from present lead-acid storage batteries. The heart of the new system is a Ford-developed crystalline ceramic electrolyte composed largely of aluminum oxide and based on a material known as beta-alumina. Further development of the Ford battery should lead to an economical, rechargeable battery system which, when adapted to a vehicle would provide greatly improved acceleration and range capabilities than now available from existing batteries. October 31, 1966. (Original caption by Science Service, Copyright - Ford Motor Company)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.018 (CD2055004): Comparison Studies - Electric Battery, 1965. Ford Motor Company comparison-studies for the feasible power sources, motors and controls for electric vehicles. (Original caption by Science Service, Copyright - Ford Motor Company)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.019 (CD2055005): Comparison Studies - Electric Battery, 1965. Ford Motor Company comparison-studies for the feasible power sources, motors and controls for electric vehicles. (Original caption by Science Service, Copyright - Ford Motor Company)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.020 (CD2055006): Ford Sodium-Sulfur Batter Cell, 1965. (Copyright - Ford Motor Company)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.021 (CD2055007): Ford Sodium-Sulfur Batter Cell, 1965. (Copyright - Ford Motor Company)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.022 (CD2055008): Fold Developed Solid Electrolyte, 1967. Ford Motor Company has demonstrated a major breakthrough in its efforts to develop a feasible power source for electric vehicles. The heart of the new sodium-sulfur battery system is a Ford-developed crystalline ceramic electrolyte composed largely of aluminum oxide and based on a material known as beta-alumina. This material selectively passes sodium ions while containing all other liquids, including liquid sodium and liquid sulfur. The ceramic can be formed and sintered by commercially feasible techniques and its conductivity at operating temperatures - 250 to 300 degrees centigrade - compares favorably with electrolytes used in conventional battery systems such as sulfuric acid and potassium hydroxide. (Original caption by Science Service, Copyright - Ford Motor Company)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.023 (CD2055009): Ford Developed Solid Electrolyte, 1967. (Copyright - Ford Motor Company)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.024 (CD2055010): Ford Electric City Car Concept, 1967. As part of an overall program to develop feasible power sources, motors and controls for electric vehicles, Ford Motor Company and Ford of Britain are engineering jointly a low-cost, sub-compact, limited performance City-Car, to carry two adult passengers and two children. Designed for operation either in crowded cities such as London or for running errands in residential and suburban areas, the car will be powered initially by lead-acid batteries. With advanced components, the car will have a range of up to 150 miles -- at a continuous speed of 40 miles an hour. Build on the first prototype is under way and is expected to be completed in the spring of 1967. A second car also will be produced in England for testing and evaluation in urban-suburban application in the United States. (Original caption by Science Service, Copyright - Ford Motor Company)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.025: City Car - Toshiba Battery Electric Car, October 12, 1967. As part of an overall program to develop feasible power sources, motors and controls for electric vehicles, Ford Motor Company and Ford of Britain are engineering jointly a low-cost, sub-compact, limited performance "City Car", to carry two adult passengers and two children. Designed for operation either in crowded cities such as London or for running errands in residential and suburban areas, the car will be powered initially by lead-acid batteries. With advanced components, the car will have a range of up to 150 miles - at a continuous speed of 40 miles an hour. Build on the first prototype is underway and is expected to be completed in the spring of 1967. A second car also will be produced in England for testing and evaluation in urban-suburban application in the United States. (Original Caption by Science Service, Copyright - Margit Friedrich from International Public Relations Co., LTD. Japan)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.026: Zinc-Air Battery, 1967. Model of cell stack for experimental zinc-air battery for vehicle propulsion. This cell stack is sized for a battery having an energy storage capacity of seven kilowatt hours of electricity. Development of the zinc-air battery system for vehicle motive power is being carried out under a jointly sponsored program of the Edison Electric Institute and General Atomic Division of General Dynamics. (Original caption by Science Service, Copyright - General Dynamics, General Atomic Division)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.027: Prototype Zinc-Air Battery. Performance of 7-kilowatt-hour experimental prototype of the zinc-air battery system for vehicle propulsion is checked during test operation at laboratories of General Atomic Division of General Dynamics in San Diego, Calif. Development of the compact and lightweight motive-power battery system is going forward under a jointly sponsored program of the Edison Electric Institute and General Atomic Division of General Dynamics. (Original caption by Science Service, Copyright - General Dynamics, General Atomic Division)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.028: Diagram for Zinc-air battery system. Charging and discharging processes of the zinc-air battery system for vehicle propulsion which is under development by the Edison electric Institute and General Atomic Division of General Dynamics. (Original caption by Science Service, Copyright - Ford Motor Company)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.029: Charging and Discharging Process, 1967. Experimental 7-kilowatt-hour laboratory prototype of zinc-air battery for vehicle propulsion during successful test operation at General Atomic Division of General Dynamics in San Diego, Calif., under jointly sponsored program of the Edison Electric Institute and General Atomic Division. (Original caption by Science Service)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.030: Experimental Battery Assembly, March 1967. Experimental 14-kilowatt-hour capacity prototype of the zinc-air battery operates train drive for small electric-power vehicle during test operations carried out under jointly sponsored development program of the Edison Electric Institute and General Atomic Division of General Dynamics. Vehicle axle and electric motor are in left foreground, with experimental prototype battery assembly to the rear. Engineer at left has hand on accelerator while test control panel is monitored at right. (Original caption by Science Service, Copyright - General Dynamics and Edison Electric Institute)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.031: Sodium-Sulfur Battery. Ford Motor Company has demonstrated a major breakthrough in its efforts to develop a feasible power source for electric vehicles. Developed by Drs. Neil Weber (left) and Joseph T. Kummer, shown with an operating cell and a model of a 2,000 watt unit, the new sodium-sulfur battery system should be able to store up to fifteen times the amount of electrical energy available from present lead-acid storage batteries. The heart of the new system is a Ford-developed crystalline ceramic electrolyte composed largely of aluminum oxide and based on a material known as beta-alumina. Further development of the Ford battery should lead to an economical, rechargeable battery system which, when adapted to a vehicle would provide greatly improved acceleration and range capabilities than now available from existing batteries.

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.032: Solid-Liquid Battery Comparisons, 1967. Ford Motor Company has demonstrated a major breakthrough in its efforts to develop a feasible power source for electric vehicles. The heart of the new sodium-sulfur battery system is a Ford-developed crystalline ceramic electrolyte composed largely of aluminum oxide and based on a material known as beta-alumina. This material selectively passes sodium ions while containing all other liquids, including liquid sodium and liquid sulfur. The ceramic can be formed and sintered by commercially feasible techniques and its conductivity at operating temperatures -- 250 to 300 degrees centigrade -- compares favorably with electrolytes used in conventional battery systems such as sulfuric acid and potassium hydroxide. (Original Caption by Science Service, Copyright - Ford Motor Company)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.033: City Car, circa 1966. As part of an overall program to develop feasible power sources, motors and controls for electric vehicles, Ford Motor Company and Ford of Britain are engineering jointly a low-cost, sub-compact, limited performance "City Car", to carry two adult passengers and two children. Designed for operation either in crowded cities such as London or for running errands in residential and suburban areas, the car will be powered initially by lead-acid batteries. With advanced components, the car will have a range of up to 150 miles -- at a continuous speed of 40 miles an hour. Build on the first prototype is underway and is expected to be completed in the spring of 1967. A second car also will be produced in England for testing and evaluation in urban-suburban application in the United States. (Original Caption by Science Service, Copyright - Ford Motor Company)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.034: Yardney Silvercel experimental electric automobile. Rear view of the Yardney Silvercel experimental electric automobile showing two silver-zinc batters, the 7.2 horsepower electric motor that drive the car without any gears, and an ampere hour meter that shows how much energy has been used after the car is driven. The Silvercel was developed by Yardney Electric Corporation, New York.

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 1.035: Electric Urbmobiles, July 16, 1966. Artist's sketch shows electric Urbmobiles traveling at 60 mph on automated tracked guideway for travel to and from suburbs, with power coming from third, electrified rail. For travel on existing street network the fume-free Urbmobile would be driven manually and powered by electric storage batteries. Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory has recently completed a year-long $110,000 feasibility study of such a future transportation system for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. HUD considers the concept of a small dual-mode electric car to be a promising idea which should be investigated further. The Urbmobile system was conceived in answer to a need for reducing air pollution, sluggish traffic movement and excessive land requirements for streets and parking areas. (Original Caption by Science Service, Copyright - Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory, Inc.)

Box 1 of 38

Subject 2 - Automobile Safety

E&MP 2.001: Guillotine Look-Alike Safety Tool, November 16, 1967. A device resembling the notorious guillotine has found its place as a safety tool at the General Motors Proving Ground near Milford, Mich. This impact device drops an instrumented load cell on the chests of test dummies to calibrate - or standardize - the spring rate of the dummies' chests. These dummies are used to test the performance of production and experimental steering assembly designs on a special test fixture which slams the dummy against the wheel. The impact device has been used by GM Proving Ground engineers to calibrate chest spring rates on all dummies used by the entire automotive industry for testing compliance with Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards. By using only one device, engineers make sure that wherever the dummies are used test results can be compared accurately. Several supplier and accessory firms also have had dummies calibrated on the Proving Ground equipment. (Original caption by Science Service, Copyright - General Motors)

Box 1 of 38

Subject 3 - Batteries

E&MP 3.001: Rubber for Wood, June 26, 1944. This is a final manufacturing operation in the making of battery separators. Here, hot water is poured on the material to insure the removal of any or all foreign matter. It is then cut in the required size where it is automatically fed to a drying machine, which may be seen in the upper right hand corner, at the Providence plant of United States Rubber Company. Alex Affredil is shown at the hot water controls. (Original caption by Science Service, Copyright - United States Rubber Company)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 3.002: Storage Batteries, no date. Negative no. 2044 - Photographic laboratory, Bureau of Standards, Washington, D.C. (Original Caption by Science Service, Copyright - National Bureau of Standards)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 3.003: Storage Batteries, no date. Negative no. 1658-3 - Photographic laboratory, Bureau of Standards, Washington, D.C. (Original Caption by Science Service, Copyright - National Bureau of Standards)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 3.004: Storage Batteries, no date. Negative no. 2469 - Photographic laboratory, Bureau of Standards, Washington, D.C. (Original Caption by Science Service, Copyright - National Bureau of Standards)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 3.005: Gadgets, August 1940. QC Storage batteries, see SP 9/4/40, Gadget Column new emergency booster for changing automobile batteries, Gen. Electric Co. (Original caption by Science Service, Copyright - General Electric)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 3.006: Gadgets, September 1940. General Electric Battery tester - SP 3/24/41 - from General Electric Co. (Original caption by Science Service, Copyright - General Electric)

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 3.007 (CD2055023): Tiny Dry Battery, January 28, 1946. Tiny dry battery that powered the "handie-talkie" used by Army Signal Corps has now been developed into the commercial model shown in the picture, used principally in hearing aids. Chemical reaction of zinc and mercuric oxide operates the cell; conventional cells use zinc and carbon.

Box 1 of 38

E&MP 3.008 to E&MP 3.018 (11 envelopes)

Box 1 of 38

Subject 4 - Brushes (Carbon)

E&MP 4.001 to E&MP 4.006 (6 envelopes)

Box 1 of 38

Subject 5 - Cables

E&MP 5.001 to E&MP 5.033 (33 envelopes)

Box 1 of 38

Box 2

Subject 6 - Cameras

E&MP 6.001 (1 envelope)

Box 2 of 38

Subject 7 - Communications

E&MP 7.001 to E&MP 7.017 (17 envelopes)

Box 2 of 38

Subject 8 - Computer Art

E&MP 8.001 to E&MP 8.007 (7 envelopes)

Box 2 of 38

Subject 9 - Dielectric Research

E&MP 9.001 to E&MP 9.020 (20 envelopes)

Box 2 of 38

Subject 10 Dynamics - Dynamos

E&MP 10.001 to E&MP 10.022 (22 envelopes)

Box 2 of 38

Box 3

E&MP 10.023 to E&MP 10.048 (26 envelopes)

Box 3 of 38

Subject 11 - Edison

E&MP 11.001 to E&MP 11.032 (32 envelopes)

Box 3 of 38

Thomas A. Edison - Biographical information, 1947-1965

Box 3 of 38

Box 4

Subject 12 - Electric Appliance and Apparatus

E&MP 12.001 to E&MP 12.047 (47 envelopes)

Box 4 of 38

Subject 13 - Electric Arcs

E&MP 13.001 to E&MP 13.011 (11 envelopes)

Box 4 of 38

Subject 14 - Electric Cables

E&MP 14.001 to E&MP 14.009 (9 envelopes)

Box 4 of 38

Subject 15 - Electric Circuits

E&MP 15.001 to E&MP 15.021 (21 envelopes)

Box 4 of 38

Subject 16 - Electric Current Converters

E&MP 16.001 to E&MP 16.003 (3 envelopes)

Box 4 of 38

Subject 17 - Electric Fans

E&MP 17.001 to E&MP 17.005 (5 envelopes)

Box 4 of 38

Box 5

Subject 18 - Electric Flood Lighting

E&MP 18.001 to E&MP 18.003 (3 envelopes)

Box 5 of 38

Subject 19 - Electric Furnaces

E&MP 19.001 to E&MP 19.021 (21 envelopes)

Box 5 of 38

Subject 20 - Electric Fuses

E&MP 20.001 (1 envelope)

Box 5 of 38

Subject 21 - Electric Generators

E&MP 21.001 to E&MP 21.041 (41 envelopes)

Box 5 of 38

Subject 22 - Electric Heating

E&MP 22.001 to E&MP 22.005 (5 envelopes)

Box 5 of 38

Subject 23 - Electric Insulators and Insulating

E&MP 23.001 to E&MP 23.010 (10 envelopes)

Box 5 of 38

Box 6

E&MP 23.011 to E&MP 23.019 (9 envelopes)

Box 6 of 38

Subject 24 - Electric Laboratories

E&MP 24.001 to E&MP 24.010 (10 envelopes)

Box 6 of 38

Subject 25 - Electric Lamps

E&MP 25.001 to E&MP 25.051 (51 envelopes)

Box 6 of 38

Box 7

E&MP 25.052 to E&MP 25.078 (27 envelopes)

Box 7 of 38

Subject 26 - Electric Light

E&MP 26.001 to E&MP 26.038 (38 envelopes)

Box 7 of 38

Subject 27 - Electric Lighting

E&MP 27.001 to E&MP 27.010 (10 envelopes)

Box 7 of 38

Box 8

E&MP 27.011 to E&MP 27.082 (72 envelopes)

Box 8 of 38

Box 9

E&MP 27.083 to E&MP 27.121 (49 envelopes)

Box 9 of 38

Subject 28 - Electric Lightning

E&MP 28.001 to E&MP 28.005 (5 envelopes)

Box 9 of 38

Subject 29 - Electric Machinery

E&MP 29.001 to E&MP 29.011 (11 envelopes)

Box 9 of 38

Subject 30 - Electric Meters

E&MP 30.001 to E&MP 30.010 (10 envelopes)

Box 9 of 38

Subject 31 - Electric Motors

E&MP 31.001 to E&MP 31.052 (52 envelopes)

Box 9 of 38

Box 10

Subject 32 - Electric Outlet

E&MP 32.001 (1 envelope)

Box 10 of 38

Subject 33 - Electric Power

E&MP 33.001 to E&MP 33.022 (22 envelopes)

Box 10 of 38

Subject 34 - Electric Power Plants

E&MP 34.001 to E&MP 34.031 (31 envelopes)

Box 10 of 38

Subject 35 - Electric Power Transmission

E&MP 35.001 to E&MP 35.009 (9 envelopes)

Box 10 of 38

Subject 36 - Electric Signs

E&MP 36.001 to E&MP 36.005 (5 envelopes)

Box 10 of 38

Subject 37 - Electric Speech

E&MP 37.001 to E&MP 37.006 (6 envelopes)

Box 10 of 38

Subject 38 - Electric Switchgear

E&MP 38.001 to E&MP 38.011 (11 envelopes)

Box 10 of 38

Box 11

Subject 39 - Electric Testing

E&MP 39.001 to E&MP 39.009 (9 envelopes)

Box 11 of 38

Subject 40 - Electric Transformers

E&MP 40.001 to E&MP 40.046 (46 envelopes)

Box 11 of 38

Subject 41 - Electric Wire

E&MP 41.001 to E&MP 41.006 (6 envelopes)

Box 11 of 38

Subject 42 - Electric Wiring

E&MP 42.001 (1 envelope)

Box 11 of 38

Subject 43 - Electrical Engineering

E&MP 43.001 to E&MP 43.007 (7 envelopes)

Box 11 of 38

Subject 44 - Electricity

E&MP 44.001 to E&MP 44.029 (29 envelopes)

Box 11 of 38

Box 12

E&MP 44.030 to E&MP 44.111 (82 envelopes)

Box 12 of 38

Box 13

E&MP 44.112 to E&MP 44.207 (96 envelopes)

Box 13 of 38

Subject 45 - Electro Static Amplification

E&MP 45.001 to E&MP 45.008 (8 envelopes)

Box 13 of 38

Subject 46 - Electroluminescence

E&MP 46.001 to E&MP 46.009 (9 envelopes)

Box 13 of 38

Box 14

E&MP 46.010 to E&MP 46.029 (20 envelopes)

Box 14 of 38

Subject 47 - Electromagnets

E&MP 47.001 to E&MP 47.026 (26 envelopes)

Box 14 of 38

Subject 48 - Electron Micrograph

E&MP 48.001 (1 envelope)

Box 14 of 38

Subject 49 - Electron Microscope

E&MP 49.001 (1 envelope)

Box 14 of 38

Subject 50 - Electron Tubes

E&MP 50.001 to E&MP 50.013 (13 envelopes)

Box 14 of 38

Subject 51 - Electronic Devices

E&MP 51.001 to E&MP 51.003 (3 envelopes)

Box 14 of 38

Subject 52 - Electronics

E&MP 52.001 to E&MP 52.030 (30 envelopes)

Box 14 of 38

Box 15

E&MP 52.031 to E&MP 52.120 (90 envelopes)

Box 15 of 38

Box 16

E&MP 52.121 to E&MP 52.156 [MISSING]

Box 16 of 38

E&MP 52.157 to E&MP 179 (29 envelopes)

Box 16 of 38

Subject 53 - Electrostatics

E&MP 53.001 to E&MP 53.012 (12 envelopes)

Box 16 of 38

Subject 54 - Faraday, Michael

Faraday, Michael (15 folders)

Box 16 of 38

Box 17

Subject 55 - Fiber Optics

E&MP 55.001 (1 envelope)

Box 17 of 38

Subject 56 - Fire Alarms

E&MP 56.001 (1 envelope)

Box 17 of 38

Subject 57 - Fluidics

E&MP 57.001 (1 envelope)

Box 17 of 38

Subject 58 - Franklin, Benjamin

E&MP 58.001 to E&MP 58.007 (7 envelopes)

Box 17 of 38

Franklin, Benjamin - Biographical Information (3 folders)

Box 17 of 38

Subject 59 - Fuel Cell

E&MP 59.001 to E&MP 59.038 (38 envelopes)

Box 17 of 38

Subject 60 - High Fidelity Series [MISSING]

Subject 61 - Image Amplifier

E&MP 61.001 (1 envelope)

Box 17 of 38

Subject 62 - Image Converter Tubes

E&MP 62.001 to E&MP 62.002 (2 envelopes)

Box 17 of 38

Subject 63 - Image Intensifiers [MISSING]

Subject 64 - Induction (Electricity)

E&MP 64.001 (1 envelope)

Box 17 of 38

Box 18

Subject 65 - Infrared

E&MP 65.001 to E&MP 65.017 (17 envelopes)

Box 18 of 38

Subject 66 - Infrared Lamps

E&MP 66.001 to E&MP 66.026 (26 envelopes)

Box 18 of 38

Subject 67 - Instrumentation

E&MP 67.001 to E&MP 67.003 (3 envelopes)

Box 18 of 38

Subject 68 - Integrated Circuits

E&MP 68.001 to E&MP 68.002 (2 envelopes)

Box 18 of 38

Subject 69 - Lasers

E&MP 69.001 (1 envelope)

Box 18 of 38

Subject 70 - Light

E&MP 70.001 to E&MP 70.032 (32 envelopes)

Box 18 of 38

Box 19

Subject 71 - Lighting

E&MP 71.001 to E&MP 71.012 (12 envelopes)

Box 19 of 38

Subject 72 - Artificial Lighting

E&MP 72.001 to E&MP 72.079 (79 envelopes)

Box 19 of 38

Box 20

E&MP 72.080 to E&MP 72.121 (42 envelopes)

Box 20 of 38

Subject 73 - Lighting Conductors

E&MP 73.001 to E&MP 73.004 (4 envelopes)

Box 20 of 38

Subject 74 - Liquid Crystal

E&MP 74.001 to E&MP 74.010 (10 envelopes)

Box 20 of 38

Subject 75 - Liquid Drops

E&MP 75.001 (1 envelope)

Box 20 of 38

Subject 76 - Loran

E&MP 76.001 to E&MP 76.015 (15 envelopes)

Box 20 of 38

Subject 77 - Loudspeakers

E&MP 77.001 to E&MP 77.005 (5 envelopes)

Box 20 of 38

Box 21

Subject 78 - Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Generator

E&MP 78.001 to E&MP 78.008 (8 envelopes)

Box 21 of 38

Subject 79 - Magnetism

E&MP 79.001 to E&MP 79.036 (36 envelopes)

Box 21 of 38

Subject 80 - Magnets

E&MP 81.001 (1 envelope)

Box 21 of 38

Subject 82 - Medical Electronics

E&MP 82.001 (1 envelope)

Box 21 of 38

Subject 83 - Microelectronics

E&MP 83.001 (1 envelope)

Box 21 of 38

Subject 84 - Microphone

E&MP 84.001 to E&MP 84.020 (20 envelopes)

Box 21 of 38

Subject 85 - Microwaves

E&MP 85.001 to E&MP 85.004 (4 envelopes)

Box 21 of 38

Subject 86 - Microwave Diodes

E&MP 86.001

Box 21 of 38

Subject 87 - Miniaturization

E&MP 87.001 to E&MP 87.006 (6 envelopes)

Box 21 of 38

Box 22

Subject 88 - Music - Electronic

E&MP 88.001 to E&MP 88.019 (19 envelopes)

Box 22 of 38

Subject 89 - Music Recording

E&MP 89.001 to E&MP 89.009 (9 envelopes)

Box 22 of 38

Subject 90 - Noise Control

E&MP 90.001 to E&MP 90.010 (10 envelopes)

Box 22 of 38

Subject 91 - Oscillograph

E&MP 91.001 to E&MP 91.004 (4 envelopes)

Box 22 of 38

Subject 92 - Oscilloscope

E&MP 92.001 (1 envelope)

Box 22 of 38

Subject 93 - Phonograph

E&MP 93.001 to E&MP 93.023 (23 envelopes)

Box 22 of 38

Subject 94 - Photoelectric Cell

E&MP 94.001 to E&MP 94.039 (39 envelopes)

Box 22 of 38

Box 23

Subject 95 - Photoelectric Tube

E&MP 95.001 to E&MP 95.019 (19 envelopes)

Box 23 of 38

Subject 96 - Phototelegraphy

E&MP 96.001 to E&MP 96.029 (29 envelopes)

Box 23 of 38

Subject 97 - Picturephone

E&MP 97.001 to E&MP 97.004 (4 envelopes)

Box 23 of 38

Subject 98 - Piezoelectricity

E&MP 98.001 to E&MP 98.002 (2 envelopes)

Box 23 of 38

Subject 99 - Power Amplifiers

E&MP 99.001 to E&MP 99.004 (4 envelopes)

Box 23 of 38

Subject 100 - Power From Wind

E&MP 100.001 to E&MP 100.003 (3 envelopes)

Box 23 of 38

Subject 101 - Power Transmission

E&MP 101.001 (1 envelope)

Box 23 of 38

Subject 102 - Proximity Fuse

E&MP 102.001 to E&MP 102.011 (11 envelopes)

Box 23 of 38

Box 24

Subject 103 - Radar

E&MP 103.001 to E&MP 103.066 (66 envelopes)

Box 24 of 38

Subject 104 - Radarscope

E&MP 104.001 to E&MP 104.012 (12 envelopes)

Box 24 of 38

Subject 105 - Radar Surveillance

E&MP 105.001 to E&MP 105.010 (10 envelopes)

Box 24 of 38

Box 25

Subject 106 - Radio

E&MP 106.001 to E&MP 106.090 (90 envelopes)

Box 25 of 38

Box 26

E&MP 106.091 to E&MP 106.180 (90 envelopes)

Box 26 of 38

Box 27

E&MP 106.181 to E&MP 106.275 (95 envelopes)

Box 27 of 38

Box 28

E&MP 106.276 to E&MP 106.365 (90 envelopes)

Box 28 of 38

Box 29

E&MP 106.366 to E&MP 106.429 (64 envelopes)

Box 29 of 38

Box 30

Subject 107 - Radio Antennae

E&MP 107.001 to E&MP 107.077 (77 envelopes)

Box 30 of 38

Subject 108 - Radiobeacons for Airways

E&MP 108.001 to E&MP 108.018 (18 envelopes)

Box 30 of 38

Box 31

Subject 109 - Radio Beamcasting

E&MP 109.001 to E&MP 109.010 (10 envelopes)

Box 31 of 38

Subject 110 - Radio Navigation

E&MP 110.001 to E&MP 110.003 (3 envelopes)

Box 31 of 38

Subject 111 - Radio Propagation

E&MP 111.001 to E&MP 111.002 (2 envelopes)

Box 31 of 38

Subject 112 - Radio Propagation - Laboratory

E&MP 112.001

Box 31 of 38

Subject 113 - Radio Receiver

E&MP 113.001 to E&MP 113.005 (5 envelopes)

Box 31 of 38

Subject 114 - Radio Transmission (facsimile)

E&MP 114.001 to E&MP 114.028 (28 envelopes)

Box 31 of 38

Subject 115 - Radio Transmitters

E&MP 115.001 to E&MP 115.007 (7 envelopes)

Box 31 of 38

Subject 116 - Radio Tubes (subminiature)

E&MP 116.001

Box 31 of 38

Subject 117 - Radome

E&MP 117.001 to E&MP 117.009 (9 envelopes)

Box 31 of 38

Subject 118 - Recording Instruments

E&MP 118.001 to E&MP 118.017 (17 envelopes)

Box 31 of 38

Subject 119 - Recordings

E&MP 119.001 to E&MP 119.005 (5 envelopes)

Box 31 of 38

Box 32

Subject 120 - Rectifiers

E&MP 120.001 to E&MP 120.004 (4 envelopes)

Box 32 of 38

Subject 121 - Reflectors

E&MP 121.001 to E&MP 121.002 (2 envelopes)

Box 32 of 38

Subject 122 - Searchlights

E&MP 122.001 to E&MP 122.032 (32 envelopes)

Box 32 of 38

Subject 123 - Semiconductors

E&MP 123.001 to E&MP 123.003 (3 envelopes)

Box 32 of 38

Subject 124 - Sonics

E&MP 124.001 to E&MP 124.004 (4 envelopes)

Box 32 of 38

Subject 125 - Speech

E&MP 125.001

Box 32 of 38

Subject 126 - Space Batteries

E&MP 126.001

Box 32 of 38

Subject 127 - Stratovision

E&MP 127.001 to E&MP 127.011 (11 envelopes)

Box 32 of 38

Subject 128 - Telegraph

E&MP 128.001 to E&MP 128.015 (15 envelopes)

Box 32 of 38

Subject 129 - Telemeter

E&MP 129.001 to E&MP 129.009 (9 envelopes)

Box 32 of 38

Box 33

Subject 130 - Telephone

E&MP 130.001 to E&MP 130.019 (19 envelopes)

Box 33 of 38

Subject 131 - Telephone Cables

E&MP 131.001 to E&MP 131.015 (15 envelopes)

Box 33 of 38

Subject 132 - Teleran

E&MP 132.001 to E&MP 132.002 (2 envelopes)

Box 33 of 38

Subject 133 - Teletypewriter

E&MP 133.001 to E&MP 133.018 (18 envelopes)

Box 33 of 38

Box 34

Subject 134 - Television

E&MP 134.001 to E&MP 134.090 (90 envelopes)

Box 34 of 38

Box 35

E&MP 134.091 to E&MP 134.190 (100 envelopes)

Box 35 of 38

Box 36

E&MP 134.191 to E&MP 134.280 (90 envelopes)

Box 36 of 38

Box 37

E&MP 134.281 to E&MP 134.370 (90 envelopes)

Box 37 of 38

Box 38

E&MP 134.371 to E&MP 134.433 (63 envelopes)

Box 38 of 38

Subject 135 - Television Transmission [MISSING]

Subject 136 - Televox

E&MP 136.001 to E&MP 136.002 (2 envelopes)

Box 38 of 38

Subject 137 - Thermeonic Converters

E&MP 137.001 to E&MP 137.003 (3 envelopes)

Box 38 of 38

Subject 138 - Thermocouples

E&MP 138.001 to E&MP 138.010 (10 envelopes)

Box 38 of 38

Subject 139 - Thermoelectricity

E&MP 139.001 to E&MP 139.010 (10 envelopes)

Box 38 of 38

Subject 140 - Thin Film Technology [MISSING]

Subject 141 - Transducers [MISSING]

Subject 142 - Transistors [MISSING]

Subject 143 - Transmitters [MISSING]

Subject 144 - Tropospheric Scatter [MISSING]

Subject 145 - Tungsten Lamps [MISSING]

Subject 146 - Vacuum Tube [MISSING]

Subject 147 - Voltmeter [MISSING]

Negatives, undated

Box 38 of 38