Finding Aid - Contains Digitized Material

Reference Request

* required
Please succinctly provide us with any information pertinent to your inquiry. If you are writing to us about a research request, provide as much detail as possible about the collections in which you are interested (including collection numbers, box numbers, and folder titles).
(if known)

The Smithsonian Institution Archives is using Constant Contact, a third-party contact management software vendor, to manage contacts and send eNewsletters. Please be advised that Constant Contact's Privacy Statement and Terms and Conditions apply to your use of these services. The Smithsonian Institution Archives has access to your name and email address which is subject to our privacy statement.

Finding Aids to Oral Histories in the Smithsonian Institution Archives

Record Unit 9594

Smithsonian Memories Project, Festival of American Folklife, 1996

Repository: Smithsonian Institution Archives, Washington, D.C. Contact us at osiaref@si.edu.
Title: Smithsonian Memories Project, Festival of American Folklife
Dates: 1996
Quantity: 160 audiotapes (Originals). 15 audiotapes (Reference copies).
Collection: Record Unit 9594
Language of Materials: English
Summary:

A section of the 1996 Festival of American Folklife was devoted to capturing the history and memories of Smithsonian for the Smithsonian Institution's celebration of its Sesquicentennial in 1996. Staff and volunteers of the Institutional History Division and the Center for Folklife Programs conducted interviews with Smithsonian staff, volunteers, and visitors about their memories of the Smithsonian. Between June 26 and July 4, 1996 some 173 individuals were interviewed alone and in groups. Interviewees included a wide array of Smithsonian staff from many museums and organizations, several Smithsonian volunteers, and a number of visitors to the Festival. Staff interviewees ranged from guards from a K-9 unit, to administrators, curators, educators, skull crews who move large objects, registrars, administrative staff, and horticultural staff, among others. Interviews of visitors focused on their reminiscences of visits to the Smithsonian museums and previous Folklife Festival.

Historical Note

A section of the 1996 Festival of American Folklife was devoted to capturing the history and memories of Smithsonian for the Smithsonian Institution's celebration of its Sesquicentennial in 1996. Staff and volunteers of the Institutional History Division and the Center for Folklife Programs conducted interviews with Smithsonian staff, volunteers, and visitors about their memories of the Smithsonian. Between June 26 and July 7, 1996, some 173 individuals were interviewed alone and in groups. Interviewees included a wide array of Smithsonian staff from many museums and organizations, several Smithsonian volunteers, and a number of visitors to the Festival. Staff interviewees ranged from guards in a K-9 unit, to administrators, curators, educators, "skull" crews who move large objects, registrars, administrative staff, and horticultural staff, among others. Interviews of visitors focused on their reminiscences of visits to the Smithsonian museums and previous Folklife Festivals. Additional interviews of collected Smithsonian staff can be found in Record Unit 9508, Senate of Scientists Interviews; Record Unit 9522, Association of Curators Reminiscences; Record Unit 9595, Smithsonian's 150thBirthday Interviews; and Record Unit 9622, National Museum of Natural History Centennial Interviews.

Top of Page

Introduction

The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Top of Page

Descriptive Entry

This collection is comprised of one hundred and sixty interview sessions, totaling approximately 68.5 hours of recordings, and 289 pages of transcript. There are two, three or four generations of recordings for each session: original tapes, re-mastered tapes and reference tapes, and digital audio .mp3 file. files. In total, this collection is comprised of 160 original audiocassette tapes, 45 re-mastered 7" and 7" low torque tapes, 22 re-mastered 10" tapes, and 15reference copy audio cassette tapes. Thirteen of the interview sessions have been transcribed, while the remainder of interview sessions have been described in short summaries.

Interviewees were Smithsonian staff, retirees, volunteers, and visitors, including:

Lorie Aceto - 033

Paul Allen - 044

Leslie Atkins - 034

Preston Atkins - 034

Betty Belanus - 123

Louise D. Belcher - 027

Stephen Belcher - 027

Dick Bell - 140

Cordelia Benedict - 141

Francine Berkowitz - 026

Maggie Bertin - 132

Carvester Booth - 050

David Bosserman - 133

Steven Bostwick - 137

Anita Buffaloe - 105

Josephine Burman - 057

Olivia Cadaval - 040

Richard Callwood - 139

Nathaniel Carleton - 071

Judy Chelnick - 099

Barbara Coffee - 091

Sheila E. Cogan - 095

Ronald Colaprete - 081

Judie Cooper - 058

Patricia Cox - 038

William E. Cox - 077

Myron Curtis - 009

Melissa Darden - 135

Herb Davis - 056

James Deutsch - 055

David DeVorkin - 006

Kathleen Dorman - 029

Doc Dougherty - 157

James Early - 062

Douglas Evelyn - 068

Edgar Farley - 101

Edward Fisher III - 153

Jody Fitterer - 008

Lou Fleming - 088

John Franklin - 085

William Gagham - 124

Jim Galvin - 096

Helen Gaul - 102

Mark Geiger - 083

John Gibson - 011

Jane Glaser - 041

Lee Galssco - 122

Andrew Goffrey - 042

Carol Gover - 036

Elease Hall - 092

Sara Harkavy - 080

Marguerite Harding - 021

Robert Harding - 078

Rebecca Hartman - 080

William Hartung - 017

Martha Hayes - 052

Leonard Hirsch - 125

Alice Hirschfeld - 002

Elaine Hodges - 134

Cynthia Hoover - 024

Bernard Howard - 136

David Howery - 131

Karin Hoyes - 001

Regina H. Ingrim - 160

Reuben Jackson - 111

David Jickling - 117

Myron Johnson - 047

Larry Jones - 042

Mitchell Jones - 149

Steve Jones - 042

Ken Jordan - 042

Martin Kaufna - 066

Walter Kelly - 144

Dana Kent - 065

David Kessler - 070

Kethshara Khlok - 147

Donald E. Kloster - 015

Ramunas Kondratas - 106

Amy Kotkin - 145

Kamille Kreger - 051

Michael Kreger - 051

Manjula Kumar - 010

Katharine Landfield - 114

Peggy Langrall - 086

Dorothy Laoang - 037

Felix Lapinski - 022

Jeffrey LaRiche - 152

Elyse Lattner - 159

Tom Lauderbaugh - 076

Myron Lecar - 059

Rose Lee - 061

Martin Levine - 107

Steven Lubar - 110

Marian Hope Lund - 003

Ian MacTavish - 073

Joseph Madeira - 014

Peter Magoon - 148

Barbara Manioc - 096

Sally Maran - 087

Kenneth Mason - 143

B. C. May - 004

Virginia McCawley - 121

Mary McCutcheon - 104

David McFadden - 025

Joseph H. McGuiness - 082

Adriana McMurray - 097

Jimmy Melendez - 044

Felicia Messina-D'Haiti - 084

Per Midboe - 073

Harry Miller - 138

Barbara Moore - 103

David Moore - 064

Marvin Nakashima - 005

Diana N'Diaye - 035

Norman Novack - 155

Jen Page - 146

Geoffrey Parker - 150

Joan Paull - 060

Marvette Perez - 109

Catherine Perge - 032

Don Phillips - 042

Jeff Place - 154

Nancy Pope - 119

Jean Porter - 007

Fred Price - 053

Louis R. Purnell - 089

Larry Randall - 054

Jahari Rashad - 158

Sharon Reinckens - 019

Sharon Rohnback - 093

Anne Roocker - 069

Rex Roocker - 069

Ingrid Roper - 031

Cordelia Rose - 115

Deborah Rothberg - 130

Lucile Rowe - 018

Margaret Santiago - 113

Lori Schlemmer - 098

Volkor K. Schmeissner - 127

Eric Scott - 046

Mina Smith Segal - 043

Ruth Selig - 108

Arnold Sperling - 048

David Squire - 156

John Stine - 030

Sally Sweetland - 023

Nancy Sweezey - 151

Charles Tamosa - 142

Kenneth Thomas - 045

L. Susan Tolbert - 112

Billy Turner - 020

Raineldo Urriola - 094

Vincent VanAllen - 128

Tom Vennum - 028

Jane Walsh - 012

Rita Wanpeha - 120

Mark H. Warmaling - 072

Deborah Watkins - 075

Mick Weltman - 067

David West - 079

Dennis Whigham - 074

Janice Whigham - 192

William White - 049

Amy Wilson - 063

Jennie Witthoff - 039

Douglas Wonderlic - 118

Mary Wood - 016

Chuck Woolf - 126

Steptoe Wrenn - 013

Holly Wright - 116

Agnes Yore - 090

Elizabeth Zimmer - 100

Amanda Zocchi - 038

Interviewers were Smithsonian staff and volunteers, including Francine Berkowitz, Maggie Bertin, Dorothy Blink, David Bosserman, Emily Botein, Olivia Cadaval, Tim Carr, Vivien Chen, Martin Collins, Eduardo Contreras, Odette Diaz, John Franklin, Shenandoah Gale, Joanne Gernstein-London, Margy Gibson, Terrica M. Gibson, John McKiernan Gonzalez, Pamela M. Henson, Paula Johnson, Katherine Kirlin, Felix Lapinski, Tom Lawrence, Brian LeMay, Magdelena Mieri, Pilar Somma Montalvo, Jen Page, Marvette Perez, Catherine Perge, Sarita Rodriguez, and Polly Stewart.

Top of Page

Preferred Citation

Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9594, , Smithsonian Memories Project, Festival of American Folklife

Top of Page

Container List

Box 1

Smithsonian Memories Interviews 1-114, Cassette tapes of Interviews

FAF/SM96-001 - Karin Hayes, June 26, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 15 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Karin Hayes was interviewed by Tom Lawrence on June 26, 1996. Hayes, originally from Los Angeles, California, joined the Smithsonian as an intern in April 1994 and is currently employed in a year long position as a Design Assistant for the Festival of American Folklife.
This interview discusses her education at the University of California at Los Angeles, her internship at the Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies under Betty Belanus, her work with Olivia Cadaval, her involvement with the production of the Festival of American Folklife, and memorable people from her time at the Smithsonian. Hayes also relates an anecdote of Diana Parker's about the Festival and the changes she has noticed in the presentation of the Festival.

FAF/SM96-002 - Alice Hirschfeld, June 26, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 11 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Alice Hirschfeld was interviewed by Margie Gibson on June 26, 1996. Hirschfeld is a volunteer at the Festival of American Folklife.
This interview discusses Hirschfeld's work as a volunteer, her interactions with the craftspeople at the Festival, her observations about visitors' interest in the exhibits, and her involvement with other volunteers.

FAF/SM96-003 - Marian Hope Lund, June 26, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 14 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Marian Hope Lund was interviewed by Tom Lawrence on June 26, 1996. Lund worked for the Smithsonian between 1966 and 1973 in the Division of Performing Arts. She left the Smithsonian in 1973 to take a position with a state art museum in Florida. Now retired, she is a member of the Women's Committee of the Smithsonian and of the Steering Committee of the Friends of Music.
This interview discusses Lund's work for the Division of the Performing Arts, notably the evolution of the Festival of American Folklife and her responsibilities for coordinating the Festival's music; the first Festival in 1967; Festival participants; colleagues Jim Morris and Ralph Rinzler; and Lund's work after leaving the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-004 - B. C. May, June 26, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 25 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
B. C. May was interviewed by Margie Gibson on June 26, 1996. May worked for the Smithsonian from1972-1977 as the Production Manager for the Folklife Festival; he also produced concerts for the Division of Performing Arts. Since leaving the Smithsonian, May has done independent production work and has consulted for the Smithsonian on further concert series.
This interview discusses May's first days working at the Smithsonian, the concert series which he developed, his selection and recruitment methods, favorite musicians, the most challenging aspects of his job, what he considers to be his biggest accomplishments, the Carter Inaugural concert series in 1977, the concert series for the second Reagan Inaugural, colleagues Jim Morris and Ralph Rinzler, and numerous anecdotes about his experiences at the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-005 - Marvin Nakashima, June 26, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 34 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Marvin Nakashima was interviewed by Margie Gibson on June 26, 1996. He is an entomologist with the Food and Drug Administration and has volunteered in the Insect Zoo of the Smithsonian for 20 years. He has also volunteered at the Festival of American Folklife for 18years.
This interview discusses Nakashima's duties as a volunteer in the Insect Zoo; how his interest in insects developed; changes that he has witnessed in the Insect Zoo; colleagues Sheila Mutchler, Lynda Richards, Bruce Daniels, Sally Love, Nate Erwin, and Joe Smith; how Nakashima began volunteering at the Insect Zoo; his experiences with visitors; interesting insect stories; the feeding and diet of insects; his participation on collecting trips; how the Insect Zoo gets most of their insects; cooperation between the Insect Zoo and the National Zoo's Invertebrate Exhibit; and volunteer training. Additionally, Nakashima talks briefly about his work as a volunteer at the Festival.

FAF/SM96-006 - David DeVorkin, June 26, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 30 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
David DeVorkin was interviewed by Polly Stewart on June 26, 1996. DeVorkin came to the Smithsonian in 1981 and is the Curator of Astronomy in Space Sciences at the National Air and Space Museum.
This interview discusses DeVorkin's hiring; his education, training, and expertise; the three segments of his job as curator; the local culture of the Smithsonian; former colleague Walter Boyne; opinions about the lack of interpretation in current Smithsonian exhibits; the Enola Gay exhibit controversy; his reinterpretation of the U2 missile; and an anecdote about Carl Sagen lecturing at the Smithsonian.
This interview is restricted; permission is required for access by anyone other than Smithsonian Institution Archives staff until DeVorkin's retirement.

FAF/SM96-007 - Jean Porter, June 26, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 19 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Jean Porter was interviewed by Pilar Somma on June 26, 1996. A native of New Jersey, Porter moved to Washington, DC, in 1951 to take a government job. She eventually came to work for the United States Army as a secretary. She is a life-long visitor of the Smithsonian.
This interview discusses Porter's memories of Smithsonian exhibits, notably the Lindbergh plane; other sites in the DC area which she visited; the changes and expansion of the Smithsonian which she has witnessed; her favorite museums at the Smithsonian; what the Smithsonian means to her life; and Smithsonian-sponsored day trips which she took in the 1980s. Porter's interview is filled with anecdotes and reminiscences about her visits to the museums.

FAF/SM96-008 - Jody Fitterer, June 26, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 22 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Jody Fitterer was interviewed by David DeVorkin on June 26, 1996. She was born in 1947 in Montclair, New Jersey. Fitterer is currently an RN at Washington Hospital, a docent at the National Museum of African Art (NMAFA), and a volunteer at the Festival of American Folklife (FAF).
This interview discusses Fitterer's education and previous jobs, her interest in the NMAFA, docent training, her interaction with the museum's curatorial staff, changes she has noticed at the Smithsonian and more specifically at the NMAFA, the organization and dynamics of the docents as a group, and several anecdotes about her experiences the NMAFA.
The interview continues with a discussion of Fitterer's involvement with the FAF, the advantages of working with the performers away from the Festival, the Folklore Society of Greater Washington, her early interest in folk festivals, stories about Festival performers, and what she hopes to see at future Festivals.

FAF/SM96-009 - Myron Curtis, June 26, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 17 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Myron Curtis was interviewed by Eduardo Contreras on June 26, 1996. Curtis, born in 1958 in Louisiana, worked as a security officer at the National Gallery of Art before coming to the Smithsonian in 1989. He began his career as a security officer at the National Air and Space Museum and now works at the National Portrait Gallery and National Museum of American Art.
This interview discusses Curtis's main duties as a security officer; his favorite stories of visitors from other nations; how he came to work at the Smithsonian; his first days working at the Smithsonian, especially in comparison to the National Gallery; a description of a typical day of work; his accomplishments while working at the Smithsonian, notably his phrase book Curtis's Easy Translator; differences between the Smithsonian and other DC tourist attractions; challenging aspects of his job; changes he has seen at the Smithsonian; specific exhibits he saw at the Smithsonian; and memories of the Folklife Festival.

FAF/SM96-010 - Manjula Kumar, June 26, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 52 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Manjula Kumar was interviewed by David DeVorkin on June 26, 1996. Born in India in 1945, Kumar lived and studied in India and England before coming to the United States in 1984. She began working at the Smithsonian in 1985 with the Festival of India, worked in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Public Service, and is now in the Office of Education and Public Service, where she manages the Educational Outreach Fund of the Smithsonian.
This interview discusses Kumar's education, her work for the Festival of India, her subsequent work at the Smithsonian in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Public Service, the development of multiculturalism and education at the Smithsonian, her work in connection with commemorative months for minorities, the beginning of the Martin Luther King program in 1987 and its goals, administrative problems of the Smithsonian in connection with her work, the development of a separate Office of Education and Public Service, Kumar's hopes for the future of the Smithsonian's education and public outreach programs, stories of working at the Smithsonian, her comments on the public's perception of the Smithsonian, and her colleagues Ralph Rinzler, James Early, and Jeffrey LaRiche.

FAF/SM96-011 - John Gibson, June 26, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 21 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
John Gibson was interviewed by Eduardo Contreras on June 26, 1996. Gibson was born in 1918 in Louisiana and came to work at the Smithsonian in 1965 after retiring from the United States Army. He was promoted through the ranks to become an Inspector in 1975 and retired in 1982.
This interview discusses Gibson's work as a security officer at the Smithsonian, his numerous promotions, his job of establishing security at the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum in New York City, how he came to work for the Smithsonian, his first days on the job, descriptions of typical days as a security guard and as a Captain, his accomplishments and successes, the challenges of the job, changes in security at the Smithsonian, his current volunteer work and hobbies, working at the Folklife Festival, and reminisces about working as a security officer at the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-012 - Jane Walsh, June 27, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 26 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Jane Walsh was interviewed by Ana Acosta on June 27, 1996. Walsh was born in 1945 in New York City and came to work at the Smithsonian in July 1971 in the Anthropological Archives. She became a researcher in the Department of Anthropology in 1975 and specializes in Mexican and pre-Columbian topics.
This interview discusses Walsh's coming to the Smithsonian; colleagues in the Anthropological Archives Cathy Harris, Cathy Creek, Paula Fleming, and Margaret Blaker; her childhood memories of visiting the National Museum of Natural History with her family; her work in the Anthropological Archives; her projects as a researcher, including the "Treasures of Mexico" exhibit and collaborations with the Performing Arts Division; her work over the last decade, including curating the New World/Mexico section of the "Seeds of Change" exhibit, archaeological work, and a collaboration with the British Museum on crystal skulls. The interview also covers the challenging aspects of her job, what it means to work at the Smithsonian, which museums she visits when she is not working, work she is doing in conjunction with the National Gallery and with Pamela Henson of the Office of Smithsonian Institution Archives, anecdotes about working at the Smithsonian, and her memories of past Folklife Festivals.
Lydia Wentz, formerly of the Center of Study of Man at the Smithsonian and a friend of Walsh's, also contributed to this interview, mainly with her memories of the Folklife Festivals.

FAF/SM96-013 - Steptoe Wrenn, June 27, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 21 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Steptoe Wrenn was interviewed by Polly Stewart on June 27, 1996. Wrenn was born in 1921 in southern Virginia and served in the military during World War II. He began working asa security officer at the Smithsonian in 1948 and received promotions until he reached the position of Executive Officer in Security. He retired in 1989 after 41 years of service to the Smithsonian. Wrenn now sells real estate.
This interview discusses what brought Wrenn to work at the Smithsonian, his duties and experiences as a security officer, the discrimination he experienced as one of the first African-Americans to work at the Smithsonian, other jobs Wrenn has held, his job training, his interactions with visitors, and reflections on what it was like to work at the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-014 - Joe Madeira, June 27, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 20 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Joe Madeira was interviewed by Ana Acosta on June 27, 1996. Madeira was born in 1965 in New York and came to the Smithsonian as an intern at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) in 1993. His current job is Coordinator of Special Exhibits at the NMNH.
This interview discusses his internship in the Office of Exhibit under Barbara Stauffer and Carolyn Margolis; fiancee and former colleague Lisa Tomaro; the positions he has held at the Smithsonian; the numerous exhibits he has worked on, including "Forces of Change,""Eyes on Science," "Ocean Planet," "Mysterious Manatees," and "Science at Sea;" the variety of duties he fulfills in a typical day; childhood visits to the Smithsonian with his family; his other jobs before coming to the Smithsonian; challenging aspects of his job; what it means to work at the Smithsonian; other Smithsonian museums he enjoys visiting; and his memories of the Folklife Festival.

FAF/SM96-015 -Donald E. Kloster, June 27, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 29 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Donald E. Kloster was interviewed by Pilar Somma on June 27, 1996. A native of Iowa, Kloster came to work at the Smithsonian in January 1960 as a museum aide in the Division of Military History, now the Armed Forces Collection in the Department of History of Technology. Kloster was promoted to museum technician and then curator, and retired in July 1994. He now works part-time at the Smithsonian.
This interview discusses Kloster's work as a museum aide in the Arts and Industries Building; colleagues Edgar M. Howell, Mendel L. Peterson, Philip K. Lundeberg, and others; changes at the Smithsonian; his professional associations with the military; the challenges of his work; the Smithsonian during World War II and the evacuation plans for certain artifacts; which objects Kloster would have saved; two book projects on which he is currently working; his opinions about the Enola Gay exhibit controversy; and what working at the Smithsonian has meant to him.

FAF/SM96-016 - Mary Wood, June 27, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 26 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Mary Wood was interviewed by Polly Stewart on June 27, 1996. Wood, originally from Minnesota, majored in history in college and moved to Washington, DC, in 1962. She has been a docent in the National Museum of American History (NMAH) for 25 years, 23 of which have been in the Industrial Revolution exhibit. She also teaches swimming part time and is active in Girl Scouts.
This interview discusses Wood's work in the medical history exhibit; her reasons for transferring to the Industrial Revolution exhibit; what brought her to the Smithsonian; Smithsonian staff members she has worked with, including Joan Madden, Alice [Reno Malone], Helen Snyder, and Martha Jo Meserole; positive and negative changes she has noticed at the Smithsonian; stories of working at the Smithsonian; visitors' reactions to her as a female docent working in the Industrial Revolution exhibit; and her opinions on docent-curator relationships in creating exhibits.

FAF/SM96-017 - William Hartung, June 27, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 12 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
William Hartung was interviewed by Eduardo Contreras on June 27, 1996. Hartung is a life-long visitor to the Smithsonian. Born in Hawaii in 1932, he worked for the Air Force for 20years, retiring in 1975. He went back to school and later worked as a research psychologist for the United States Army Research Institute in Alexandria, Virginia. He first visited the Smithsonian in 1963 during a visit to Washington, DC, and has made many visits since that time. This interview discusses Hartung's first visit to the Smithsonian in 1963, his first impressions of the Smithsonian as a national resource, the growth and changes of the Smithsonian since his first visit, favorite museums, memories of visiting the Festival of American Folklife, and what the Smithsonian means to him.

FAF/SM96-018 - Lucile Rowe, June 27, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 12 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Lucile Rowe was interviewed by Polly Stewart on June 27, 1996. Rowe, born in 1927, is a native of Washington, DC, and has visited the Smithsonian many times in her life. She has four children and nine grandchildren.
This interview discusses the neighborhood in which Rowe grew up, childhood visits to the Smithsonian with her family, her impressions of the Smithsonian as it expanded, her enjoyment in visiting the many art galleries of the Smithsonian, the King Tut and Vermeer exhibits, exhibits at the Renwick Gallery, the National Zoo, visiting the Festival of American Folklife regularly since the early 1970s, and an anecdote about Secretary Charles G. Abbot.

FAF/SM96-019 - Sharon Reinckens, June 27, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 10 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Sharon Reinckens was interviewed by Eduardo Contreras on June 27, 1996. Reinckens was born in Washington, DC, in 1951; she worked for the Defense Department Museum before coming to work for the Smithsonian in 1983. She began her Smithsonian career at the Anacostia Museum and is currently the Deputy Director of that museum.
This interview discusses Reinckens's previous work designing exhibits; her learning experiences working with John R. Kinard, the founding director of the Anacostia Museum; visiting an Egyptian archaeology exhibit at the Smithsonian as a child and how it influenced her career choice; the different positions she has held at the Anacostia Museum; the variety of work she does as Deputy Director; changes she has noted in the Smithsonian and specifically at the Anacostia Museum; a description of community based work in relation to the museum; the challenges of working at the museum and the differences between it and other museums; the Black Mosaic project; and her impressions and memories of many Folklife Festivals.

FAF/SM96-020 -Billy Turner, June 27, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 27 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Billy Turner was interviewed by Jen Page on June 27, 1996. Turner was born in Washington, DC, in 1939 and came to work for the Smithsonian in 1968 as a welder at the National Zoo.
This interview discusses Turner's prior employment, his family's farms in southern Maryland, how Turner came to work for the Smithsonian, his first impressions of the job, a typical daily schedule, changes in his job and at the Zoo, working with animals, the challenging aspects of his job, what it means to work for the Smithsonian, and his observations about the Festival of American Folklife. Turner also relates numerous anecdotes about working with the animals at the Zoo.

FAF/SM96-021 - Marguerite Harding, June 27, 1996

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 19 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Marguerite Harding was interviewed by Pilar Somma on June 27, 1996. Harding is a volunteer at the Freer, Sackler, and Renwick Galleries. She began her volunteer work 10 years ago at the National Museum of American History (NMAH). Harding worked as an elementary school teacher for Prince George's County for 25 years, as a lab technician at Georgetown University Hospital, and served in the Navy.
This interview discusses Harding's responsibilities and experiences as a volunteer at the NMAH, her reasons for changing to the Sackler Gallery, differences in working at these two museums, why she started volunteering, her memories of visiting the Smithsonian museums with her children in the 1950s, what working at the Smithsonian means to her, her involvement with past Folklife Festivals, her favorite Smithsonian exhibits, and a humorous story about the visit of Jean-Paul Carlhian, the architect of the Sackler Gallery.

FAF/SM96-022 - Felix Lapinski, June 27, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 32 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Felix Lapinski was interviewed by Polly Stewart on June 27, 1996. Lapinski was born in New York in 1923; worked for the General Electric Factory in Bridgeport, Connecticut; and served in the Army in World War II. He graduated from the Georgetown University Foreign Service School in 1949 and worked for the Agency for International Development until 1967; he then worked for the Department of Community Affairs in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Lapinski worked next at the Bureau of Land Management in the Department of the Interior for 13 years. Lapinski taught English as a second language for 9 years and served in the Peace Corps from1990-1992. Lapinski has been a docent at the Smithsonian Castle since 1976 and has also worked in Trips and Tours and the Information Desks of all Smithsonian museums.
This interview discusses Lapinski's parents' heritage and their emigration from Poland to the United States, his childhood and dreams of being a history teacher, his various careers, how he came to volunteer at the Smithsonian, the various volunteer positions he has held, his reflections on the Smithsonian Institution, and anecdotes about working in the Castle. Lapinski also relates several historical stories about the Smithsonian, including a discussion of the Horatio Greenough statue of George Washington, a photograph of the Joseph Henry family on the Mall, and the donation of the British escutcheons.

FAF/SM96-023 - Sally Sweetland, June 27, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 8 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Sally Sweetland was interviewed by Polly Stewart on June 27, 1996. She has volunteered at the Information Desk of the National Air and Space Museum (NASM) for 9 years and was also a volunteer at early Folklife Festivals.
This interview discusses Sweetland's memories of working at the Folklife Festivals and her experiences as a volunteer at the NASM, focusing mainly on visitors' questions she has handled.

FAF/SM96-024 - Cynthia Hoover, June 27, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 34 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Cynthia Hoover was interviewed by Angel Nieves on June 27, 1996. She was born in Nebraska in 1934, studied in Massachusetts, and taught at Wellesley College for several years. She then came to work at the Smithsonian in May 1961 as the curator of musical instruments.
This interview discusses Hoover's work at the Smithsonian and her focus on American instruments, the role of music and museums, and how music relates to people and culture. The interview also covers the differences she has noted over her years of employment;the evolution of the Festival of American Folklife; the expansion of various musical programs at the Smithsonian; the exhibits she has worked on, notably "Making Music American Style" and "Music Machines"; her planned exhibit on the 300th anniversary of the piano's invention; the challenges of working at the Smithsonian; her visits to many museums and her impressions of them; the changes she has seen the Smithsonian and other museums undergo; her opinion on the future of museums; and memories of the Folklife Festivals she has attended.
Hoover asks interviewer Nieves about his work and the two discuss interdisciplinary approaches of interpreting history.

FAF/SM96-025 - David McFadden, June 27, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 26 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
David McFadden was interviewed by Jen Page on June 27, 1996. Born in North Dakota in 1947, McFadden worked for 8 years at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts as the curator of decorative arts. He came to the Smithsonian in 1978 and worked as the curator of decorative arts at the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum in New York City. He remained there for 16 years and in his last year was promoted to Assistant Director for Collections and Research. He is now the Executive Director of the Millicent Rogers Museum in Taos, New Mexico.
This interview discusses McFadden's succession of jobs; the history of the Cooper-Hewitt Museum and its collections; colleagues Lisa Suter Taylor, Christian Rohlfing, Elaine Dee, Milton Sonday, Gillian Moss, and Ann Dorfsman; how he came to work at the Smithsonian; the variety of work McFadden did; his first impressions and his first day working at the Smithsonian; a description of a typical day of work; how his job changed over the years, mainly in the increase of fundraising and public relations; the differences between working for the Smithsonian and a government agency or private corporation; the challenges of working at the Smithsonian; changes at the Smithsonian during his tenure; what working at the Smithsonian meant to him; and several reminiscences about working at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum.

FAF/SM96-026 - Francine Berkowitz, June 27, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 36 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Francine Berkowitz was interviewed by Pilar Somma on June 27, 1996. She came to work at the Smithsonian in 1965 as a roving typist, working mainly in the Office of the Registrar. From there she was transferred to the International Activities Office and worked on the Smithsonian Special Foreign Currency Program, which was later reorganized in the Office of Fellowships and Grants. She is now the Director of the Office of International Relations (OIR).
This interview discusses Berkowitz's duties and the broadening of her responsibilities as she worked at the Smithsonian, her current responsibilities, the steps she takes to ensure foreign research, foreign dignitaries she has met, the speed with which her office works, the database which OIR uses, disasters and problems she has encountered, changes at the Smithsonian, the Enola Gay exhibit controversy, and her opinions on recent Smithsonian exhibits. The interview continues with Berkowitz's impressions of the Smithsonian before working here, how she got her job, her unusual promotions, the Smithsonian's former policies which favored employees with Ph.D. degrees, being a woman and working at the Smithsonian, her favorite museums and exhibits, and her memories of the Folklife Festivals. Berkowitz includes many reminiscences, including a story about President Johnson, and mentions colleagues Helena Weiss, Dr. Bob Hoffman, Ralph Rinzler, Jeffrey [LaRiche?], Richard Kurin, and Mary Ann Sedillo.

FAF/SM96-027 - Stephen "Pat" Belcher and Louise D. Belcher, June 27, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 17 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Stephen "Pat" Belcher and Louise D. Belcher were interviewed by Pilar Somma on June 27, 1996. Both were in the foreign service; Mr. Belcher worked for the Smithsonian for two years to prepare for the Bicentennial Festival of American Folklife. He worked as a diplomatic liaison for the Old Ways in the New World and for the African Diaspora sections of the Festival. Mrs. Belcher has been a volunteer and docent since 1974.
This interview discusses the variety of work the Belchers did for the Bicentennial Festival of American Folklife, several anecdotes about performers, and Mr. Belcher's colleagues Shirley Cherkasky, Rosie Horn, and Bernice Reagon. Mrs. Belcher discusses the numerous volunteer and docent jobs she has filled over the years, including working at the Natural History Museum, the Hirshhorn, and now the National Museum of American Art. They also discuss their opinions of the 1996 Festival of American Folklife.

FAF/SM96-028 - Tom Vennum, June 28, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 41 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Tom Vennum was interviewed by Polly Stewart on June 28, 1996. Vennum received his doctorate from Harvard and has worked at the Smithsonian as an ethnomusicologist since1975. He works closely with the Festival of American Folklife and focuses his research on Native American culture and music.
This interview discusses Vennum's coming to the Smithsonian and his work with Ralph Rinzler in preparing for the 1976 Bicentennial Festival of American Folklife, including his fieldwork in Germany, Switzerland, and Austria. The interview also covers his educational and musical background, how he chose his field of expertise, his first fieldwork experience, his work on both Smithsonian and non-Smithsonian committees, what it is like for him to work at the Smithsonian; his books, and his efforts to correct misconceptions about Native American life. This interview also contains numerous anecdotes about his work for the Folklife Festivals and the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-029 - Kathleen Dorman, June 28, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 24 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Kathleen Dorman was interviewed by Polly Stewart on June 28, 1996. Dorman moved to the Washington, DC, area in 1970 after graduating from college with an undergraduate degree in history. Hired as a clerk typist for the Joseph Henry Papers project, she has worked there for 26 years and is now the Assistant Editor.
This interview discusses Dorman's job search and hiring at the Smithsonian; her work for the Henry papers, specifically the publication of the 15 volumes of Henry documents; the history of Joseph Henry and his association with and shaping of the Smithsonian; how others react when she tells them where she works; the Enola Gay exhibit controversy and the creating of exhibits for the public presentation of history; the ethos of the Smithsonian as a workplace; descriptions and memories of the different buildings in which she has worked, notably the Pension building, the Castle, and the Arts and Industries Building; and a story about a protest on the Mall.

FAF/SM96-030 - John Stine, June 28, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 48 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
John Stine was interviewed by Paula Johnson on June 28, 1996. Stine was born in Baltimore in 1929 and came to work for the Smithsonian in 1961 in the Railroads Section of the Division of Transportation. He retired in December 1989 and continues to do tool work for the Smithsonian.
This interview discusses Stine's hiring process; the opening of the National Museum of American History in 1964; moving the objects into the new building; colleague Howard Chapelle and his impact on the public's perception of the Smithsonian; Stine's work on acquiring and restoring numerous transportation artifacts; his other projects, including a video disk of photographs and a movie about the Herman Pott and the Mississippi River; changes at the Smithsonian; colleagues John "Jack" White, Jim Knowles, Martin Burke, Robert Post, Roger Kennedy, Melvin Jackson, John Hiller, Frank Taylor, and others; Stine's childhood interests and memories of the Smithsonian; and his advice to current Smithsonian employees. There are numerous anecdotes throughout this interview.

FAF/SM96-031 - Ingrid Roper, June 28, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 20 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Ingrid Roper was interviewed by Pilar Somma on June 28, 1996. Roper is a volunteer at the National Museum of Natural History and collaborates with her husband Clyde Roper, who works in the Division of Mollusks. She has been associated with the Smithsonian since 1966 when her husband began working here.
This interview discusses her husband's education and research specialties, their work on translating Chuen's work on squids from German to English, the work Roper does with her husband, his fieldwork and her role on these trips, a future trip to the Azore Islands, the cooperation of the Smithsonian with other scientific institutions, her volunteer work in the Division of Mollusks, her memories and impressions of the Folklife Festivals, the "Marine Life" and "Giant Squid" exhibits, her family, and a story of how she helped her husband when he was injured.

FAF/SM96-032 - Catherine Perge, June 28, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 26 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Catherine Perge was interviewed by Eduardo Contreras on June 28, 1996. Born in Washington, DC, in 1956, Perge began her career at the Smithsonian in September 1981 as an intern under Martha Morris, Registrar in the National Museum of American History (NMAH). Her internship became a permanent job by 1982, and she remained with the Office of the Registrar until October 1994. She is currently the Deputy Associate Director for Public Services in the Office of Public Services in the NMAH.
This interview discusses Perge's work during her internship; her duties when she joined the permanent staff, including working with the collections and loans, acquisition program, and shipping and receiving; the expansion of her responsibilities; the reorganization of the NMAH in 1994 and her new position in the Office of Public Services; her favorite memories of working at the Smithsonian; her childhood visits to the Institution; her major accomplishments at the Smithsonian; comparing working at the Smithsonian to working at other museums; the challenges of maintaining morale and motivation in the face of budget cuts; changes at the Smithsonian; and her past and present impressions of the Folklife Festivals.

FAF/SM96-033 - Lorie H. Aceto, June 28, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 46 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Lorie H. Aceto was interviewed by Pam Henson on June 28, 1996. Aceto was born in Weisbaden, Germany, and immigrated first to Canada in 1957 and then to the United States in 1958. She began her career at the Smithsonian in 1972 as a photographer in the Office of Printing and Photographing Services (OPPS) and is now the Deputy Director of that office.
This interview discusses Aceto's developing interest in photography, her early career in Germany, her interaction with American troops after the end of World War II, her reasons for emigrating, her working and living experiences in Canada, her move to the United States, and her work with commercial photography.
The interview also covers how Aceto came to work for the Smithsonian; her first day of work; her major accomplishment of building the color facility for the Smithsonian; colleagues Arthur Dauch, T. Ames Wheeler, Jim Murphy, Mike Centro, Dr. Paul Perrot, Dr. Walter Boyne, Dr. Paul Garber, Joe Goulait, John Jameson, and Jeff Tinsley; working in the NMAH and the Arts and Industries building; what the Smithsonian was like under the administration of Secretary Ripley; the experience of being a woman and working at the Smithsonian; exhibits Aceto has worked on; a description of a typical day; the various committees Aceto serves on; her work on the 150th anniversary of the Smithsonian, especially with Barbara Hart, Kevin Greene, Jeannette Stimpfel, Alan Fern, and Eloise Baden; are evaluation of her career; her perception of the problems that face the Smithsonian today; moving to the Museum Support Center; and the successes of her career, including the color facility, the Civic Program, and the "America's Smithsonian" exhibit.

FAF/SM96-034 - Preston and Leslie Atkins, June 28, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 14 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Preston and Leslie Atkins were interviewed by Paula Johnson on June 28, 1996. Preston and Leslie met each other through a Smithsonian Resident Associates class in 1993 and were married in December 1994. They now live in the DC area and are frequent visitors to the Smithsonian.
This interview discusses where they were born, the first Folklife Festival they attended, their careers, their unusual meeting at a Resident Associates class, why they took the class, what the Smithsonian means to their lives, the other classes Mrs. Atkins has taken through the Smithsonian, and their favorite exhibits and memories.

FAF/SM96-035 - Diana N'Diaye, June 28, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 17 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Diana N'Diaye was interviewed by Eduardo Contreras on June 28, 1996. N'Diaye was born in New York in 1950; she came to the Smithsonian in 1990 when she was hired for the Senegal program of the Festival of American Folklife. She is now a Cultural Specialist and Program Curator for the Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (CFPCS).
This interview discusses N'Diaye's coming to the Smithsonian, her work on Maroon communities with colleague Kenneth Bilby, her 1993 exhibit "Kids' Play and Performance Tradition", her current research on African immigrant communities, the Smithsonian's impact on her and her family, her impressions of the Smithsonian before working here, her first day of work, a typical week of work, her accomplishments, the challenges she faces in choosing and balancing projects, changes in the CFPCS, and her favorite memory of a young performer at the Folklife Festival.

FAF/SM96-036 - Carol Gover, June 28, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 23 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Carol Gover was interviewed by Maggie Bertin on June 28, 1996. Born in Maryland, Gover attended Western Maryland University and received a degree in liberal arts. She began working for the Smithsonian in 1988 and is an Equal Employment Specialist.
This interview discusses how Gover came to work at the Smithsonian; her work with affirmative action, sexual harassment, and upward mobility programs; her views on the staff's camaraderie and commitment; public outreach and awards programs, specifically the Secretary's Award for Equal Opportunity; her work with the Advocacy Network; diversity at the Smithsonian today and how this compares with other government offices; her first day of work; a typical day of work; her favorite museums at the Smithsonian; Folklife Festival memories; Easter Monday at the Zoo; and what she would like to see in the Smithsonian's future.

FAF/SM96-037 - Dorothy Laoang, June 28, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 16 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Dorothy Laoang was interviewed by Catherine Perge on June 28, 1996. Laoang was born in New York City and is a graphic designer. Laoang was a volunteer at the National Air and Space Museum during the Star Trek exhibition. She now resides in the Washington, DC, area and visits the Smithsonian several times a year.
This interview discusses Laoang's childhood visits to the Smithsonian, her volunteer work for the Star Trek exhibit, which museums she now visits, what the Smithsonian means to her, memories of the Folklife Festivals and the Zoo, and stories of Laoang's two uncles who were affiliated with the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-038 - Patricia Cox and Amanda Zocchi, June 28, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 30 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Patricia Cox and Amanda Zocchi were interviewed by Catherine Perge on June 28, 1996. Cox was born in Paris, France, in 1959 and works for Amtrak; Zocchi was born in Maryland in 1987.
This interview discusses how long Cox has been visiting the Smithsonian, her parents' emphasis on learning about many cultures, her frequent visits to the art galleries of the Smithsonian, the Monet exhibit, her reasons for visiting the Smithsonian, her opinions about many of the museums, her assessment of the 1996 Festival of American Folklife, her opinions on teaching and presenting history, why she brings Zocchi to the Smithsonian, her enriching friendships with Native Americans, and many memories of the Festival of American Folklife.
Zocchi's portion of the interview covers how long she has been coming to the Smithsonian, Natural History as her favorite museum, a memory of a rhino at the Zoo, and her Folklife Festival memories of Native Americans.

FAF/SM96-039 - Jenie Witthoff, June 28, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 18 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Jenie Witthoff was interviewed by Maggie Bertin on June 28, 1996. Witthoff, originally from New York, was born in 1922 and now lives in Pennsylvania. She worked as a writer for the state of Pennsylvania and is now retired. She has been a Smithsonian Associate for at least 12 years and is a life-long visitor.
This interview discusses Witthoff's visits to the Smithsonian; her continuing education at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania; her interest in all museums, especially the Smithsonian; memories of Dr. William Fenton, a Smithsonian anthropologist; her memories of past Folklife Festivals, especially the Russian dancers and singers; and her fondness for certain Smithsonian museums and her dislike of others. This interview also includes a discussion of public transportation in England and the United States and the resources of the National Archives.

FAF/SM96-040 - Olivia Cadaval, June 28, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 45 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Olivia Cadaval was interviewed by Maggie Bertin on June 28, 1996. Cadaval's first association with the Smithsonian was in 1976 when she worked as a cultural liaison for the Bicentennial Folklife Festival. She maintained a connection with the Smithsonian and was officially hired in 1989 as a folklife specialist with the Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (CFPCS).
This interview discusses the work Cadaval does at CFPCS now, the course of her career at the Smithsonian, how she got involved with the 1976 Festival, Ralph Rinzler, how folklife fits the vision of the Smithsonian, the development and history of CFPCS, what led her to obtain her Ph.D., CFPCS as a training ground for folklorists, her connections with the public, diversity at the Smithsonian, her involvement with Latin American and Latino communities, and her interest in interns. The interview also covers how CFPCS engages communities and works with them; the future of the Folklife Center; what folklife is; her favorite Festival story; her impressions about working at the Smithsonian; her favorite museums; visiting the Smithsonian with family members; memorable exhibits, notably "Chicano Art: Resistance and Affirmation"; the Zoo and its relation to the ethnic communities in Washington, DC; and what Cadaval hopes for the future of the Smithsonian. Her interview also mentions colleagues Maria Teresa O'Leary, Jim Morris, Richard Kurin, and Pam Henson.

FAF/SM96-041 - Jane Glaser, June 28, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 35 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Jane Glaser was interviewed by Maggie Bertin on June 28, 1996. Born in Indiana in 1923, Glaser began her career in museum work at a children's museum in Charleston, West Virginia. She worked there for 12 years before coming to the Smithsonian in 1975 as the Director of the Office of Museum Programs (now the Center for Museum Studies). Glaser retired in April 1996 and is now a Research Associate; she is currently working on several Smithsonian-related projects.
This interview discusses Glaser's work in creating the Office of Museum Programs (OMP); the expansion of its workshops to a national and international level; her work in establishing internship programs, the Professional Visitor Program, the American Indian Training Program, audio-visual programs about preventative conservation, and training programs for docents; how OMP has changed since she retired from the directorship; how her interest and career in museum work began; her work at the children's museum in Charleston, West Virginia; how Paul Perrot recruited her to work at the Smithsonian; colleagues Denny O'Toole and Robert Organ; and several stories about working at the Smithsonian.
The interview also covers Glaser's work since she retired, notably her completed book on planning museum careers, her children's book-in-progress about the Smithsonian, and Gender Perspectives, which she edited and published with Artemis Zenetou; The Educated Eye, a recording of lectures on connoisseurship, and the finishing of the Kellogg video project called Museum and Community. The interview concludes with Glaser's vision for the Smithsonian in the future, focusing on technology and its role in offices and exhibits, and her opinion on the overly political nature of the Smithsonian today.

FAF/SM96-042 - The Skull Crew (Steve Jones, Andrew Goffrey, Don Phillips, Ken Jordan) and Larry Jones, June 28, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 49 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
The Skull Crew (Steve Jones, Andrew Goffrey, Don Phillips, and Ken Jordan) and Larry Jones were interviewed by Catherine Perge on June 28, 1996. The Skull Crew is the rigger team in the National Museum of American History (NMAH). Steve Jones, born in North Carolina in 1947, is the rigger foreman. Andrew "Goff" Goffrey was born in Washington, DC, in 1947 and is a rigger worker. Don "Phil" Phillips was born in Washington, DC, in 1951 and is the rigger leader. Ken Jordan was born in Virginia in 1946 and is the Assistant Facility Manager at the NMAH. Larry Jones was born in Virginia in 1942 and is the Museum Specialist with the Agriculture Collection in the Division of History and Technology in the NMAH.
This interview discusses when and where these men were born, when they came to work at the Smithsonian and how their jobs have changed over their employment, their current jobs, the origin of the name "the Skull Crew," favorite anecdotes, a description of a typical day at work, how they came to work at the Smithsonian and why they stayed, the supportive and family-like atmosphere of the Smithsonian, and colleagues John Stine, Bob Post, Harrison "Hawk" Hawkins, Nancy Kirkpatrick, Bill Worthington, Jack White, Bob Vogel, Bill Withun, Paul Forman, and others.

FAF/SM96-043 - Mina Smith Segal, June 28, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 26 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Mina Smith Segal was interviewed by Catherine Perge on June 28, 1996. Segal was born in 1942 and lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where she is an art teacher. She has been visiting the Smithsonian and the Folklife Festivals for 7 years.
This interview discusses her first visit to the Festival of American Folklife; how often she visits; her impressions of the Smithsonian; memorable exhibits at the Smithsonian museums, including the recreation of the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial exhibit, the Monet, Whistler, and Barnes exhibits at the National Gallery, the Vietnam Memorial exhibit, "From Parlor to Politics", and "A More Perfect Union"; the New Mexico, Russia, Hawaii, and France exhibits at the Folklife Festivals; the types of exhibits she enjoys and what she would like to see more of; her interest in folk art and related Smithsonian exhibits; her vacations to Washington, DC; and her comments on the 1996 Festival of American Folklife and the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit.

FAF/SM96-044 - Jimmy Melendez and "Milo" and Paul Allen and "K-9 Lucky", June 29, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 28 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Jimmy Melendez and Paul Allen were interviewed by Catherine Perge on June 29, 1996. Melendez was born in New York, served in the military, and worked in several other law enforcement positions before coming to work at the Smithsonian in 1994. Allen was born in Virginia in 1964 and has been a security officer at the Smithsonian since February 1991. Both are in the K-9 corps, Melendez since 1994 and Allen since November 1995.
This interview discusses how Melendez and Allen came to work for the Smithsonian, background information on the K-9 force at the Smithsonian, the training program for officers and dogs, how the officers and dogs work together, living arrangements for the dogs, the nature of the dogs chosen, changes that Melendez and Allen have observed in Protection Services, collaborations with the DC and Park police, Melendez's and Allen's visits to the Smithsonian in their free time, and their thoughts on being a Smithsonian worker.

FAF/SM96-045 - Kenneth Thomas, June 29, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 51 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Kenneth "Kenny" Thomas was interviewed by Katherine Kirlin on June 29, 1996. Thomas was born in Washington, DC, in 1948 and grew up in Maryland. He served in the Navy for two years and began working at the Smithsonian in 1969 as a security guard. In 1973 Thomas became a sergeant on the force, and in 1976 he made captain. In August 1984 he was promoted to Inspector in the Protection Services Division, and in March 1994 he became Security Manager for the Arts and Industries Building, the Castle, and the Quadrangle.
This interview discusses the course of his career at the Smithsonian; the duties of his current position; his work as a facilitator for Investment Excellence, a self-improvement workshop; security issues during 1976 and the Bicentennial celebration; changes that the Smithsonian's Protection Services Division has undergone; visiting the Smithsonian in the 1950s; the numerous political and public figures Thomas has met; memories of the 1976 and 1981 Folklife Festivals; stories about security at the Smithsonian; his plans for the future; colleagues Pete Mackassy, Lt. Willie Jones, Lt. Will Lassiter, Mr. John Barnes, and Col. Carl Grimsley; and his positive appraisal of the 1996 Festival of American Folklife.

FAF/SM96-046 - Eric Scott, June 29, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 23 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Eric Scott was interviewed by Catherine Perge on June 29, 1996. Born in Washington, DC, in 1954, Scott came to work at the Smithsonian in 1985 as a security officer. He is now a Special Police Officer at the National Museum of American Art (NMAA) and the National Portrait Gallery (NPG).
This interview discusses how Scott came to work for the Smithsonian; why he wanted to work in an art gallery; his own artistic work; his involvement with Dr. [Alan] Fern and Dr. Ellicott; a typical day at work; interacting with visitors; artists represented in the collection; the challenge of working with many different personalities; the changes he has witnessed in the museums and in the Protection Services Division; the continuing training of security officers; what working at the Smithsonian means to him; Security in general in the NMAA and NPG; his previous employment; visiting the museums when he is not working; and his work at and visits to Folklife Festivals.

FAF/SM96-047 - Myron Johnson, June 29, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 29 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Myron Johnson was interviewed by Katherine Kirlin on June 29, 1996. Johnson was born in Washington, DC, in 1955. He worked for Public Housing and the Department of Agriculture before coming to the Smithsonian in 1990 as a temporary laborer. He is now a full-time laborer for Facilities Planning and Management and is responsible for the grounds outside of the National Museum of American History (NMAH).
This interview discusses a typical day of work; how bad weather affects Johnson's job; his experience as a workshop facilitator; working with the riggers in NMAH; unusual exhibits and events; an anecdote about President Clinton jogging on the Mall; changes Johnson has seen at the NMAH; visits to the Smithsonian as a child; memories of Easter Monday at the Zoo; celebrating the 4th of July with his family in DC; memories of the Folklife Festivals, notably blues musician Archie Edwards; changes in the city of Washington, DC; public events and demonstrations on the Mall; and the building of the National Air and Space Museum, the Hirshhorn, and the Quadrangle museums.

FAF/SM96-048 - Arnold Sperling, June 29, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 25 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Arnold Sperling was interviewed by Catherine Perge on June 29, 1996. Born in Washington, DC, in 1932, Sperling is a retired recreation therapist and worked for the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. He is an Information Specialist at the National Air and Space Museum (NASM) and the National Museum of American History (NMAH).
This interview discusses what an Information Specialist does, the rules they must follow, how Sperling got involved in volunteering, the buildings he has worked in, his childhood visits to the Smithsonian, a typical day of work, anecdotes about volunteering at the Smithsonian, comments about the Smithsonian's many visitors, descriptions of the initial and ongoing training for Smithsonian volunteers, various attractions in DC from Sperling's childhood, what it means to him to work at the Smithsonian, and his impressions of the Folklife Festivals.

FAF/SM96-049 - William White, June 29, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 9 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
William White was interviewed by Katherine Kirlin on June 29, 1996. White, a native of Washington, DC, lives in Colorado with his family. He is a special education teacher. He and his family are going to the New Jersey shore for vacation and stopped in DC to visit the Festival of American Folklife.
This interview discusses White's childhood visits to the Smithsonian, the types of history and artifacts which he likes, the changes he has noted at the Smithsonian, visits to the Zoo with his daughters, bringing his classes to the National Air and Space Museum on field trips, what the Smithsonian means to him, memories of past Folklife Festivals, and descriptions of Colorado museums.

FAF/SM96-050 - Carvester Booth, June 29, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 24 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Carvester Booth was interviewed by Catherine Perge on June 29, 1996. Booth served in the United States Air Force from 1945 until 1968. He then worked as a medical technician at St. John's Mercy Hospital. Booth was hired as a security officer at the Smithsonian in 1970. He was promoted to Captain and retired in 1992.
This interview discusses Booth's careers, how he was hired, why he enjoyed working at the Smithsonian, his promotion to Captain, the buildings he worked in, a typical day as a security officer and the issues he dealt with, several stories about his job, working at the Suitland, Maryland facility, his training, challenges of the job, what working at the Smithsonian meant to him, and his contact with colleagues and the Smithsonian since he retired.

FAF/SM96-051 - Kamille and Michael Kreger, June 29, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 25 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Kamille and Michael Kreger were interviewed by Katherine Kirlin on June 29, 1996. She was born in Washington, DC, in 1961 and is a day care provider. He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1962 and is an Information Specialist with the USDA's Animal Welfare Information Center in Beltsville, Maryland. They reside in Laurel, Maryland, and are life-long visitors to the Smithsonian.
This interview discusses reminiscences of Mrs. Kreger's great uncle Watson Perrygo, who was a taxidermist at the Smithsonian; her trips to the Smithsonian as a child; Mr. Kreger's reminiscences of the Smithsonian; his amateur and professional involvement with the museums and staff; his comments and criticisms about the Smithsonian's current exhibits; the British Columbia Museum in Victoria, Canada; and the Kregers' memories of Folklife Festivals. Smithsonian staff who are mentioned in this interview include Keith Simmons, Keith Ferris (?), Roland Howard, Bill Deiss, Bob Golag, Kay Kenyon, and Melba Shields.

FAF/SM96-052 - Martha Hayes, June 29, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 22 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Martha Hayes was interviewed by Catherine Perge on June 29, 1996. Born in Bethesda, Maryland, in 1953, Hayes worked at the Smithsonian from 1982-1987 in the Paleobiology Division of the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). Prior to working at the Smithsonian, she was employed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as a coastal sedimentologist. She is now a hydrologist at the U. S. Geological Survey in the Office of Water Resources Division in Maryland.
This interview discusses Hayes's career at the Smithsonian, her participation in the massive inventory in the NMNH, her work with sedimentologist Jack Pierce, her memories of working at the Smithsonian, challenging aspects of her job, the changes she saw at the Smithsonian, what working at the Smithsonian meant to her, and her recollections of Folklife Festivals.

FAF/SM96-053 - Fred Price, June 29, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 25 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Fred Price was interviewed by David Bosserman on June 29, 1996. He came to work at the Smithsonian in 1978 as a member of the grounds crew for the Festival of American Folklife. He worked as the grounds crew chief and is now a rigger in the National Museum of African Art and the Sackler Gallery.
This interview discusses what Price did as part of the grounds crew, what his job entails now, the changes he has seen at the Folklife Festivals, his memories of early Folklife Festivals, and what it is like to work in the underground Quad complex. He mentions Ralph Rinzler, James Early, Diana Parker, Barbara Strickland, Paul Squier, Pete Reiniger, and Richard Debacher.

FAF/SM96-054 - Larry Randall, June 29, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 18 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Larry Randall was interviewed by Shenandoah Gale on June 29, 1996. Born in Wisconsin, Randall moved to Washington, DC, in 1976. He is an engineer for the Federal Aviation Administration and has volunteered at the Smithsonian for 11 years on the phones at Visitor Information & Associates Reception Center (VIARC) and at the Festival of American Folklife.
This interview discusses how VIARC operates, memorable experiences, dealing with the language barrier, a typical day from when Randall first started, questions he hasen countered, dealing with sensitive issues, the differences between working at the Smithsonian and at a government agency, his visits to the Smithsonian when he is not working, and memories of the government shut-downs.

FAF/SM96-055 - Jim Deutsch, June 29, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 18 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Jim Deutsch was interviewed by David Bosserman on June 29, 1996. Deutsch moved to Washington, DC in 1982 and volunteered at the Festival of American Folklife in 1990. He has worked at the Smithsonian in numerous temporary positions since 1991. He is primarily associated with the Festival of American Folklife and has done fieldwork sponsored by the Smithsonian.
This interview discusses Deutsch's positions with the Festival of American Folklife, specifically his work as Foodways Coordinator for the Family Farm and Indonesia exhibits; his cookbook project; memorable Folklife Festivals; American folklife in general and a definition of who the folk are; his work with occupational folklife, including lawyers, White House workers, and Smithsonian security officers; and Smithsonian staff Barbara Strickland and Marjorie Hunt.

FAF/SM96-056 - Herb Davis, June 29, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 12 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Herb Davis was interviewed by Shenandoah Gale on June 29, 1996. Davis has lived in Washington, DC, since1978 and works in the Advertising Department of the Washington Post. He is a frequent visitor to the Smithsonian.
This interview discusses Davis's first trip to the Smithsonian in the early1970s, his love of the National Air and Space Museum, the Resident Associate classes he has taken, his memories of the Folklife Festivals, the National Zoo, the Smithsonian's publicity, and what the Smithsonian means to him.

FAF/SM96-057 - Josephine Burman, June 29, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 16 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Josephine Burman was interviewed by David Bosserman on June 29, 1996. She lives in Maryland and worked as a design consultant for her husband's firm. She has been a volunteer at the National Zoo for 26 years.
This interview discusses her volunteer work at the Zoo, how she became a Zoo volunteer, the changes at the Zoo, her memories of visitors, her work for the Zoo on Wheels outreach program, and her husband's involvement in her volunteer work.

FAF/SM96-058 - Judie Cooper, June 29, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 24 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Judie Cooper was interviewed by Shenandoah Gale on June 29, 1996. Born in Des Moines, Iowa, Cooper moved to Washington, DC, in 1963. She began working at the Smithsonian in 1978 and is currently the Assistant Director of Crafts Services for the Office of Physical Plant.
This interview discusses Cooper's childhood associations with the Smithsonian; how she got her first job at the Smithsonian; her work as a file clerk in the Office of Facility Planning and Engineering Services (now the Office of Design and Construction); her promotions to her current position; what her job entails; changes at the Smithsonian; the differences between the Smithsonian and a government job; challenging aspects of her job; memorable projects, notably the "Ocean Planet" exhibit and the building of the Quadrangle; favorite Folklife Festivals; and her reflections on the Festival of American Folklife and the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-059 - Myron Lecar, June 29, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 33 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Myron "Mike" Lecar was interviewed by David Bosserman on June 29, 1996. He is an astrophysicist and has worked at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, for 30 years.
This interview discusses how he came to work at the Smithsonian; his involvement in the building of the first astronomical observatory in Israel; the connection between the Astrophysical Observatory and Harvard; Lecar's own research specialties; research opportunities at the Smithsonian as compared to elsewhere; his desire for a National University in Washington, DC; his opinion on the role of computers in this era; collections and research at the Smithsonian; and colleagues Fred L. Whipple, James C. Bradley, and Michael Collins.

FAF/SM96-060 - Joan Paull, June 29, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 16 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Joan Paull was interviewed by Shenandoah Gale on June 29, 1996. Born in Washington, DC, in 1929, Paull has volunteered at the Festival of American Folklife in the Press Tent since 1973.
This interview discusses Paull's reasons for volunteering, her favorite Festival stories, the development of the children's area at the Festival, changes she has seen at the Festival, favorite Festival exhibits, and the overlap of her volunteering at the Smithsonian and her work with Girl Scouts.

FAF/SM96-061 - Rose Lee, June 30, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 9 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Rose Lee was interviewed by Tim Carr on June 30, 1996. Born in California in 1929, Lee has lived in Arlington, Virginia, since 1970. She is retired from a federal job and volunteers at the Smithsonian. She began in January 1995 at the Information Desk of the National Museum of African Art and now works at the Castle.
This interview discusses her volunteer work at the Smithsonian; her impression of the work; visitors, volunteers, and staff she has met; the scheduling of volunteers; favorite exhibits; and her volunteer work beyond the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-062 - James Early, June 30, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 33 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
James Early was interviewed by Tim Carr on June 30, 1996. He worked at the Smithsonian in the 1970s in preparation for the 1976 Bicentennial Festival of American Folklife and returned in 1984. He is now the Director of Cultural Studies and Communication at the Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies.
This interview discusses the course of Early's career at the Smithsonian; his assessment of the Festival of American Folklife; colleagues Rayna Green, Bernice Reagon, Ralph Rinzler, and others; how his career at the Smithsonian began; the 1976 Festival of American Folklife; his preparations for the South Africa exhibit at the 1997 Festival of American Folklife; his relationship and work with John Kinard; comments on Secretaries Ripley, Adams, and Heyman; the Enola Gay exhibit controversy and censorship at the Smithsonian; working for a Smithsonian office rather than a Smithsonian museum; hopes for future Folklife Festivals; and his research focused on Cuba.

FAF/SM96-063 - Amy Wilson, June 30, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 17 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Amy Wilson was interviewed by Pilar Somma on June 30, 1996. A native of Canada, Wilson came to the Smithsonian as an intern in September 1995. She now works full-time at Visitor Information & Associates Reception Center (VIARC), where she supervises all of the volunteers at the National Museum of American History.
This interview discusses Wilson's collections internship at the Center for African-American History and Culture, the issues surrounding the Center's failure to become a museum, the duties of her current position with VIARC, the questions and requests she encounters on the job, how her interest in theSmithsonian developed, childhood memories of exhibits, her experiences at the 1996 Folklife Festival, and reminiscences about visiting the National Museum of American History.

FAF/SM96-064 - David Moore, June 30, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 5 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
David Moore was interviewed by Tim Carr on June 30, 1996. Moore is a musician from Iowa and is a presenter at the 1996 Festival of American Folklife.
This interview discusses Moore's work as a presenter for the Iowa section of the Folklife Festival, the types of music found in Iowa, his career as a musician, how he got involved with the Smithsonian and the Folklife Festival, his impressions of the Folklife Festival, and the logistics of working for the Festival.

FAF/SM96-065 - Donna Kent, June 30, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 4 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Donna Kent was interviewed by Tim Carr on June 30, 1996. Kent has lived in the Washington, DC, area since 1967 and is an Information Specialist at the Castle building.
This interview discusses why Kent began volunteering, the process she went through to become a volunteer, her impressions of the Smithsonian, favorite museums at the Smithsonian, where she takes her guests for sightseeing, and what her job as an Information Specialist entails.

FAF/SM96-066 - Martin Kaufna, June 30, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 15 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Martin Kaufna was interviewed by Pilar Somma on June 30, 1996. Kaufna is retired from the Air Force, where he served 30 years of active duty. He now lives in Arlington, Virginia, and is a frequent visitor to the Smithsonian.
This interview discusses Kaufna's first visit to the Smithsonian 15 years ago, his visit to the National Air and Space Museum on the day of its opening, the frequency of his visits to the Smithsonian, the development of his interest in Japanese pottery, his close connection with the Freer Gallery and its staff, school tours to the Smithsonian, his reactions to the Enola Gay exhibit, his tour of duty in Japan, and what the Smithsonian means to him.

FAF/SM96-067 - Mick Weltman, June 30, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 11 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Mick Weltman was interviewed by Shenandoah Gale on June 30, 1996. Born in St. Louis, Missouri, Weltman is a management consultant with non-profit organizations. He moved to Washington, DC, in 1984 and began visiting the Smithsonian on a regular basis at that time.
This interview discusses Weltman's memories of the Smithsonian, specifically his first visit, the Quadrangle complex, the National Gallery, and the National Portrait Gallery; what the Smithsonian and the Festival of American Folklife mean to him; memories of the Folklife Festival; and comments on the Zoo.

FAF/SM96-068 - Douglas Evelyn, June 30, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 58 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Douglas Evelyn was interviewed by Tim Carr on June 30, 1996. Born in New York, Evelyn moved to Washington, DC, after completing college in 1963. He began working at the American Association of Museums and came to the National Portrait Gallery (NPG) in 1969. He worked there for 10 years, rising to the position of Deputy Director. In 1979 he began working atthe National Museum of American History (NMAH) as Deputy Director. After 12 years at NMAH, Evelyn became Deputy Director of the National Museum of the American Indian(NMAI) in 1991.
This interview discusses Evelyn's job at the American Association of Museums; how he came to work for the Smithsonian; his work as an administrator; his career at the NPG, the NMAH, and the NMAI; the broadening of his interest while at the NMAH; his Ph.D. research; impressions of NMAH's Director Roger Kennedy and his work; his work on the development of the National Postal Museum. The interview also covers what drew him to work at the NMAI; the current status of the NMAI project; plans for public programming at the NMAI; comments on Secretaries Ripley, Adams, and Heyman; his memories of working at the Smithsonian; what Evelyn plans to do in the future; what working at the Smithsonian means to him; and what the Institution means to the American people. The interview mentions colleagues Richard Howland, Alan Fern, Roger Kennedy, Burt Collins, Charles Frankel, Phillip Samuel"Sam" Hughes, Lonnie Bunch, Mike Carrigan, Ellen Roney Hughes, Marilyn Marton, Constance Berry Newman, and Barbara Clark Smith.

FAF/SM96-069 - Anne and Rex Roocker, June 30, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 43 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Anne and Rex Roocker were interviewed by Shenandoah Gale on June 30, 1996. Mrs. Roocker was born in Florida in 1949 and is a housewife and works part time for a bankrupcy lawyer. Mr. Roocker was born in Kansas in 1949 and is retired after a 20 year career in the Army. They moved to Washington, DC, in 1986 and are frequent visitors to the Smithsonian.
This interview discusses the Roockers's memories of their first visit to the Smithsonian in 1970, their favorite museums and exhibits, their respective interests in art and racing, 4th of July visits to the Mall, memories of past Folklife Festivals, changes on the Mall, Mr. Roocker's military work at the White House and his descriptions of the interior, the changes of technology that the Roockers have seen, thoughts on the necessity of museums and history in the future, reflections on the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit at the Folklife Festival, and the Zoo.

FAF/SM96-070 - David Kessler, June 30, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 15 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
David Kessler was interviewed by Shenandoah Gale on June 30, 1996. Kessler was born in 1953 in New Jersey and graduated from Sarah Lawrence College in New York in December 1974 with a degree in biology. He came to Washington, DC, in 1975 and began volunteering at the Zoo. He became a permanent employee in 1977 and is now a keeper at the National Zoo.
This interview discusses what Kessler's job entails, his research in the breeding of animals, his work as a mentor for high school students, his work with naked mole rats, how he came to work at the Zoo, a typical day of work, the various animals he has worked with, the Zoo's position as part of the Smithsonian, memories of the Festival of American Folklife, history of the Zoo and its buildings, what working at the Smithsonian means to him, andan anecdote about working at the Zoo.

FAF/SM96-071 - Nathaniel Carleton, June 30, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 42 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Nathaniel Carleton was interviewed by Terrica Gibson on June 30, 1996. Educated at Harvard as a physicist, Carleton was a professor at Harvard until coming to work for the Smithsonian in the early 1960s. He works at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
This interview discusses Carleton's work as an atomic physicist; his career at the Smithsonian; the development of the professional relationship between Harvard and the SAO; Dr. Fred Whipple and his directorship at the SAO; the conception, building, and early years of the observatory in Cambridge; the planning, financing, building, and outfitting of the Whipple Observatory in Mt. Hopkins, Arizona; the multiple mirror telescope (MMT) that Carleton helped to design and build at Mt. Hopkins; the MMT's innovations and its impact on the scholarly community; a comparison of the different types of telescopes; Carleton's current work at the SAO; his plans for future work; the staff at the SAO; his wife's involvement at the Smithsonian as a volunteer; weather disasters in Arizona which affected the Whipple Observatory; and the strengths of George Field and Irwin Shapiro as subsequent directors of the SAO.

FAF/SM96-072 - Mark Wamaling, June 30, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 11 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Mark Wamaling was interviewed by Terrica Gibson on June 30, 1996. He works for a company that provided fine arts services for the Smithsonian for the "America's Smithsonian" exhibit.
This interview discusses the scope of fine arts services, his work on packing the "America's Smithsonian" exhibit, interesting objects he encountered, the difficulty of packing certain artifacts, the experience of working with historical objects, and his connections with the Smithsonian staff.

FAF/SM96-073 - Per Midboe and Ian MacTavish, June 30, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 18 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Per Midboe and Ian MacTavish were interviewed by Shenandoah Gale on June 30,1996. Both were born in Virginia. Midboe and MacTavish are neighbors and students.
This interview discusses their previous visits to the Smithsonian, memories of the dinosaur in front of the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), school trips to the Smithsonian museums, the spider exhibit at the NMNH, the Christmas special at the National Museum of American History, and the Hope Diamond. Midboe talks about her experiences going behind the scenes to visit storage and research facilities at the Smithsonian, impressions of the Festival of American Folklife, and the National Zoo.

FAF/SM96-074 - Dennis Whigham, June 30, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 17 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Dennis Whigham was interviewed by Terrica Gibson on June 30, 1996. Originally from western Pennsylvania, Whigham was trained as a plant ecologist. He worked as a college professor before coming to work at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) in January 1977.
This interview discusses the focus of SERC's research when Whigham first began working; its current research interests; the changes at SERC; Whigham's own research in wetland ecology and orchids; how he came to work for the Smithsonian; memorable experiences of working at the Smithsonian; his international fieldwork in Mexico, Belize, the Netherlands, and Japan; his collaboration with interns and fellows; and his affiliation with several conservation groups.

FAF/SM96-075 - Deborah Watkins, June 30, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 27 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Deborah Watkins was interviewed by Shenandoah Gale on June 30, 1996. Born in Washington, DC, Watkins served in the Army as a drill sergeant for 8 years. She then worked in the Department of the Army before coming to work as a security officer at the Smithsonian in 1982. Beginning as a summer aide, Watkins was later hired permanently and is currently a night manager in the Office of Protection Services.
This interview discusses how Watkins came to work for the Smithsonian; a typical day of work at the National Museum of Natural History; memories of her first visit to the Smithsonian; descriptions of the school groups that visit the Smithsonian today; the diversity of the Smithsonian; what a typical day for Watkins now involves; stories from her job; the changes Watkins has seen in her 15 years of employment; what it is like to work at the Festival of American Folklife (FAF), especially on the 4th of July; being a presenter at the 1996 FAF; employment at the Smithsonian as compared to at a private or government agency; challenges she has faced on the job; and women security officers at the Smithsonian now and where Watkins hopes they will be in the future.

FAF/SM96-076 - Tom Lowderbaugh, July 3, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 33 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Tom Lowderbaugh was interviewed by Joanne Gernstein on July 3, 1996. Lowderbaugh was born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1943. He began his career at the Smithsonian in 1977 as a writer/editor in the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education. He is currently the Deputy Director of that office.
This interview discusses Lowderbaugh's work prior to coming to the Smithsonian, the course of his Smithsonian career, how he came to work at the Smithsonian, his first impressions of the Institution, his dissertation, a description of his two current projects, who he works with, a typical day, and challenges of working at the Smithsonian. The interview also covers changes he has seen and what he hopes to see in the future, what working at the Smithsonian means to him, memories of Folklife Festivals, what a typical day of work was when Lowderbaugh first started, Real Time events, visiting the museums when he is not working, and the overlap of his work at the Smithsonian and his teaching at the University of Maryland.

FAF/SM96-077 - William E. Cox, July 3, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 33 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
William E. Cox was interviewed by Joanne Gernstein on July 3, 1996. Cox was born in Washington, DC, and came to work at the Smithsonian in 1975. He is now an archivist in the Office of Smithsonian Institution Archives and is in charge of the archival programs at the National Museum of Natural History and the National Zoological Park.
This interview discusses childhood visits to the Smithsonian; how he started working at the Smithsonian; his first day of work; descriptions of the Archives when he started and how it has changed; techniques of his job; interesting projects Cox has worked on; his mentor Bill Deiss; colleagues Richard Lytle, Jim Steed, Nigel Elmore, Paul Theerman, Pam Henson, and Alan Bain; the Smithsonian during the Ripley administration; challenging aspects of his job; what working at the Smithsonian means to him; visiting the museums after work; memories of unusual events at the Smithsonian; his impressions of the Folklife Festivals; and speculations on his own future at the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-078 - Robert Harding, July 3, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 43 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Robert Harding was interviewed by Vivien Chen on July 3, 1996. Born in 1944 in Georgia, Harding has lived in Washington, DC, for most of his life. He began his career at the Smithsonian in February 1968 as a history instructor in the Division of Education and Training at the National Museum of American History (NMAH). He spent 12 years in this Division and then moved to the Department of Science and Technology. In 1982 Harding was appointed to help form the NMAH Archives Center, and he is now Deputy Archivist of the Center, the head of the manuscripts collections and the Sam DeVincent Collection of Illustrated American Sheet Music.
This interview discusses Harding's first day of work at the Smithsonian; the course of his career at the Smithsonian; colleagues Dr. Elwin, Nathaniel Dixon, Margery Hines, Bernard Finn, Doug Evelyn, John Fleckner, Craig Orr, and Catherine Keen; and his collaboration with Martha Jo Meserole and Don Kloster in creating the 1776 Discovery Corner. The interview also covers the inception of the Archives Center, how he came to work for the Archives Center, the Center's growth, childhood visits and impressions of the Smithsonian, what his responsibilities include now, challenges of the job, changes he has seen at the Smithsonian, his hopes for the future of the Smithsonian, memories of past Folklife Festivals, the current state of the Archives Center, and stories of working at the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-079 - Dave West, July 3, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 27 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Dave West was interviewed by Joanne Gernstein on July 3, 1996. Born in Indiana in 1923, West served in the Army Air Corps in World War II. After the war, he worked for United Airlines in their Chicago offices and later for the Airline Trade Association in Washington, DC. He has been a Visitor Information & Associate Reception Center (VIARC) volunteer at the Smithsonian for the past ten years and works in the Castle and at the National Air and Space Museum.
This interview discusses how and why West came to volunteer at the Smithsonian; his career in the airline industry; his first visit to the Smithsonian in the 1960s; his training and first day as a volunteer; changes in VIARC; his volunteerism compared to his career; stories about outstanding visitors; atypical day of work; his relationship with other volunteers, notably Irving Roth; challenges of volunteering; being a docent during the Enola Gay exhibit controversy; memories of Folklife Festivals; and Smithsonian staff Mary Grace Potter, Bill Blandy, and Roberta Buchanan.

FAF/SM96-080 - Rebecca Hartman and Sara Hackavy, July 3, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 8 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Rebecca Hartman and Sara Hackavy were interviewed by Eduardo Contreras on July 3,1996. Hackavy was born in Washington, DC, in 1977 and Hartman was born in Illinois in 1974. Both are students and are spending their summer working as interns in the Joseph Henry Papers Project.
This interview discusses what their internship involves, Tuesday Colloquiums, how each one got her internship, childhood visits to the Smithsonian, a typical day, utilizing there sources outside of the Smithsonian, comparing this internship to other opportunities, possibilities for their future careers, and their impressions of the Festival of American Folklife.

FAF/SM96-081 - Ronald Colaprete, July 3, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 45 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Ronald Colaprete was interviewed by Vivien Chen on July 3, 1996. Colaprete was born in Ohio in 1931 and served in the Air Force for three years during the Korean War. He returned to civilian life for 11 months and then rejoined the military, serving for 22 years. He came to work for the Smithsonian in 1975 as a General Investigator and retired in October 1994 as the Chief of the Protection Division.
This interview discusses Colaprete's military career, how he came to work for the Smithsonian, college friend and colleague Jay Chambers, the course of his career at the Institution, the organization of the Protection Division, his work with other departments and agencies within and outside of the Smithsonian, several crime stories, and the failure of a pilot program to make officers more accessible to the public. The interview also covers his visit to the Smithsonian prior to his employment; his first day of work; a typical day as General Inspector; developments and improvements in the Protection Division over Colaprete's 20 year career; Smithsonian security officers compared to military personnel; and working during the visit of a head of state, notably the Emperor of Japan. The interview concludes with a discussion of Colaprete's contributions to the Protection Division; what the Smithsonian means to him; professional relationships at and beyond the Smithsonian, including the FBI and the Park Services; security issues at Folklife Festivals; and Colaprete's presentation on the narrative stage for the 1996 Festival of American Folklife.

FAF/SM96-082 - Joseph H. McGuiness, July 3, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 34 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Joseph H. McGuiness was interviewed by Brian LeMay on July 3, 1996. McGuiness, 32years old, was born and raised in Iowa and attended the University of Wisconsin at Steven's Point. He interned at the Smithsonian in the Department of Botany during the summers of 1985 and 1986. McGuiness received his master's degree at Tennessee Tech University and is currently the North Zone Wildlife Biologist for the Cherokee National Forest in Tennessee.
This interview discusses McGuiness's internship duties; Smithsonian staff members Mary Sangrey, George "Rusty" Russell, Debbie Dell, and Dr. [Elbert] Little; how his internship has served him in his career; how he got the internship; his experiences living in Washington, DC; his impressions of the Smithsonian; continuing connections with the Institution; the grass symposium and his and other interns' involvement with it; his memories of the Folklife Festivals; his opinions on the Iowa section of the 1996 Festival of American Folklife; his research andc areer development since the Smithsonian; and future research plans.

FAF/SM96-083 - Mark Geiger, July 3, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 19 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Mark Geiger was interviewed by Sarita Rodriguez on July 3, 1996. Geiger is a specialist in chemical and occupational safety and is a volunteer at the 1996 Festival of American Folklife. His daughter is also a volunteer at the Festival.
This interview discusses Geiger's childhood in Washington, DC, and his memories of the Smithsonian; changes on the Mall which he has witnessed; memories of past Folklife Festivals, especially Indonesia and Japan; his career; many of theSmithsonian museums and historic DC buildings; his anticipation of the 1997 Festival of American Folklife and the participation of South Africa; his comments on being a volunteer at the Festival; and the 150th anniversary celebrations and "America's Smithsonian".

FAF/SM96-084 - Felicia Messina-D'Haiti, July 3, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 9 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Felicia Messina-D'Haiti was interviewed by Sarita Rodriguez on July 3, 1996. Born in Washington, DC, in 1969, Messina-D'Haiti came to work at the Smithsonian in July 1995. She is in the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education and works with the Smithsonian On-Line on America On-Line.
This interview discusses what she does for her job, her childhood visits to the Smithsonian, Folklife Festival memories, her comments on the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit at the 1996 Festival of American Folklife, a typical day at work, what working at the Smithsonian means to her and to others, her visits to the museums, her volunteer work at the National Gallery, and her involvement with the 150th anniversary celebration.

FAF/SM96-085 - John Franklin, July 3, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 38 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
John Franklin was interviewed by Sarita Rodriguez on July 3, 1996. He was born in Washington, DC, in 1952 and taught English for the Ministry of Higher Education in Senegal after completing college. He came to the Smithsonian in 1975, assisting Bernice Reagon-Johnson with the African Diaspora exhibit at the 1976 Festival of American Folklife. He went back to Senegal at the end of the summer of 1976 and returned to the Smithsonian in 1982. He worked in the Office of Interdisciplinary Studies until 1992 when the Office was disbanded. He then moved to the Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (CFPCS) and is now a Program Manager there. Franklin is also the chair of the Smithsonian African-American Association.
This interview discusses Franklin's career with the Smithsonian, his role as presenter for Haiti and Senegal in the 1976 Festival of American Folklife, stories about the Festival participants, how he came back to the Smithsonian in 1982,the Office of Interdisciplinary Studies and its function, and the work Franklin did in this office. The interview also covers his choosing to work at the CFPCS, the most challenging aspect of Franklin's job, what working at the Smithsonian means to him, the purpose and work of th eSmithsonian African-American Association, and his visits to the museums.
The interview continues with a description of Franklin's work as a researcher on the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit, including his interviewing the Horticulture Division and the Advocacy groups; his collaboration with the Horticulture Division in creating their exhibit and demonstrations; how he is preparing to curate the South Africa exhibit at the 1997 Festival of American Folklife; and his impressions of the 1996 Festival of American Folklife.

FAF/SM96-086 - Peggy Langrall, July 3, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 43 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Peggy Langrall was interviewed by Brian LeMay on July 3, 1996. Born in Richmond, Virginia, in 1930, Langrall received her degree in art education at the age of 50 and came to work for the Smithsonian in 1980. She did clerical work, first in the Parking Department and then for Jay Chambers in the Protection Division. She then moved to the Office of Public Affairs (OPA )where she worked at the front desk for three years. She was eventually promoted to writer/editor in that office and retired from the Smithsonian in June 1995. She is now involved in yoga, volunteer work at the Smithsonian, and writing her memoirs.
This interview discusses the course of Langrall's career at the Smithsonian, Al Rosenthal and the OPA under his direction, the types of writing she did, changes in the focus of the OPA, Madeleine Jacobs and her management of the OPA, OPA publications, and the Smithsonian during the Ripley administration. The interview also covers how the Smithsonian affects her life now, memories of India at the Folklife Festival, comments on the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit at the 1996 Festival of American Folklife, changes in the public's perception and involvement with the Smithsonian, and the Enola Gay exhibit controversy.
The interview concludes with a discussion of her current writing projects; colleagues Vicki Moeser, John Barrat, Mary Cohen, Inc Mendelson, Bill Schulz, David Maxfield, Rachel Sears, and Paul Perrot; the writing and editing process at OPA; Langrall's personal methods of work; the loss of the news service; and stories from her years of working at the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-087 - Sally Maran, July 3, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 17 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Sally Maran was interviewed by Eduardo Contreras on July 3, 1996. Maran was born in Seattle, Washington, in 1938 and worked at Life magazine before coming to the Smithsonian in 1969. She was part of the original staff at the Smithsonian magazine and worked as an assistant editor. She was promoted to associate editor and worked full-time until 1972 when she left to start her family. She continued to work part-time as an associate editor until 1990, when she joined the Board of Editors full-time.
This interview discusses Maran's association with Life magazine; how she came to work for the Smithsonian; the course of her career; the types of work she did in each of her positions; the operations of the Smithsonian magazine; publications of memorable issues; the cycle of work at the magazine for each month's production schedule; her major accomplishments, including creating an internship program and networking the office's computers; comparing the Smithsonian magazine with Life; and challenging aspects of her job. The interview also covers changes at the Smithsonian, mostly in the development of the National Air and Space Museum; her memories of the construction of the Ripley Center; and her comments on Folklife Festivals.

FAF/SM96-088 - Lou Fleming, July 4, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 30 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Lou Fleming was interviewed by Jen Page on July 4, 1996. Born in Detroit, Michigan, in 1949, Fleming began his career at the Smithsonian in 1973 as a laborer at the Arts and Industries Building and the Castle. He is now the Mobile Equipment Foreman at the National Air and Space Museum (NASM).
This interview discusses Fleming's duties as a laborer at the Arts and Industries and Castle buildings, notably his responsibility for the owls in the Castle, his work with antique furniture, and how he learned about Smithsonian and general history on the job; the uses of the Castle when Fleming began his job; and colleagues Franklin Underwood, Claude Russell, Mr. [Mansfield] Coates, and Mr. [Charles] Shields. The interview also covers the NASM collections before the current building was constructed, working at several Inauguration parties, famous people he has met on the job, how he got his job at the Smithsonian, his first impressions of the Institution, his first day of work, a typical day of work, how his job has changed since he began, the machines he uses, the cleaning of the airplanes at NASM, the Spirit of St. Louis, working for the Smithsonian as compared to a government or private company, and the challenges of safety on the job.

FAF/SM96-089 - Louis Purnell, July 4, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 34 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Louis Purnell was interviewed by Dorothy Blink on July 4, 1996. Purnell was born in Maryland in 1920 and served as a fighter pilot during World War II. After the war, he began his career at the Smithsonian as a museum specialist in paleontology at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). He worked there for 7 years before moving to the Department of Astronautics at the National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Purnell retired from the Smithsonian in 1985.
This interview discusses the course of Purnell's career, his work at the NMNH, visiting the Smithsonian on a high school trip, his first day of work, and the catalog he compiled. The interview also covers why he wished to transfer to the NASM, the prejudice he dealt with, his work at the NASM in the Department of Astronautics, the building of the current NASM building, a typical day of work, and his travel for the Smithsonian.
The interview concludes with a discussion of his hobbies and projects since retiring, working for the Smithsonian as compared to working for the government or a private agency, the challenge of presenting material for the public's consumption, the changes Purnell has seen in the staff of the Smithsonian, and numerous reminiscences about working at the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-090 - Agnes Yore, July 4, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 17 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Agnes Yore was interviewed by Jen Page on July 4, 1996. Yore was born in Virginia in 1928 and graduated from the Medical College of Virginia in 1950 as a registered nurse. She worked at the Department of Defense from 1972 until 1980, when she came to the Smithsonian. She was the first nurse at the Smithsonian to pass the National Boards to be certified as an occupational health nurse. She retired from the Smithsonian in 1994.
This interview discusses Yore's schooling and certification as a nurse, the history of industrial nursing, her first impressions of the Smithsonian as an employee, what her job included, her first day on the job, a typical day of work, and a story about working with a Zoo employee, how she got her job, her visits to the Smithsonian with her children and her impressions as a visitor, how her job changed, nursing at the Smithsonian as compared to a hospital or doctor's office, challenges of her job. The interview also covers the changes she has seen at the Smithsonian; what working at the Smithsonian meant to her; how and when she visited the museums; memorable events during her employment at the Smithsonian, including the building of the Postal Museum and meeting famous people; memories of the Folklife Festivals; and her reactions to the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit at the 1996 Festival of American Folklife.

FAF/SM96-091 - Barbara Coffee, July 4, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 86 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Barbara Coffee was interviewed by Eduardo Contreras on July 4, 1996. Coffee was born in Wisconsin in 1940 and completed a double major in fine arts and archaeology. She began her career at the Smithsonian in July 1963 as a member of the exhibition production tea mat the National Museum of American History (NMAH). She worked with the team for three years and then moved to the Division of Political History, where she worked for 18 years. She then was the collections manager in the Department of Social and Cultural History, where she worked until she retired in October 1994. During her 31 year career at the Smithsonian, Coffee served as the first president of the Museum Specialist, Technicians, and Aides Association.
This interview discusses the course of Coffee's career; stories about her early years of working at the Smithsonian; her work with the First Ladies collection; Margaret B. Klapthor, the curator of the First Ladies collection; her work at the 1969 Inaugural Ball; her impressions of the Smithsonian before she began working here; a typical work day and how it changed; changes in the funding of exhibits; her experience as a woman laborer and as a woman working at the Smithsonian; her major accomplishments, notably the organization and care of the collections and her teaching and training of interns; working at the Smithsonian as compared to another museum; memories of the Folklife Festival; and comments on early Festivals and recent ones. The interview continues with a discussion of Coffee's work with "The Treasures of the Smithsonian" exhibit, which was presented at the Edinburgh Festival; her meetings with First Ladies; the Hall of Historic Americans; stories of working in unfavorable conditions; thefts at the NMAH; accidents with artifacts; and many reminiscences about working at the NMAH and with the collections.
Coffee's friend Sue Ann Sadler, who aided in the interview by prompting several of Coffee's stories, reflects on Coffee, her career, and the importance of oral history. Coffee then finishes the interview with comments on the Skull Crew, what working at the Smithsonian meant to her, her participation in a committee to appoint a new director of the NMAH; meeting Neil Harris, a University of Chicago professor; and anecdotes about her career.

FAF/SM96-092 - Elease Hall, July 4, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 26 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Elease Hall was interviewed by Jen Page on July 4, 1996. Born in 1930 in South Carolina, Hall was raised in Washington, DC. She began working at the Smithsonian in 1965 as an elevator operator in the National Museum of American History (NMAH). In 1974, Hall became one of the first woman security officers at the Smithsonian. She worked at the National Museum of American Art(NMAA) until her retirement in 1994.
This interview discusses the course of Hall's career at the Smithsonian; Smithsonian staff members Captain Chapman, Captain [Levi] Graham, Dr.[Joshua] Taylor, Dr. Jones, and Mr. [Ronald] Colaprete; stories of visitors at the NMAA; her visits to the Smithsonian as a child; her first impressions of working at the Smithsonian; her first day as an elevator operator; and the people she encountered at the NMAH. The interview also covers a typical day of work for both of her jobs; meeting artists Alma Thomas, Jacob Kainen, and Sam Gilliam, and other celebrities; the battles Hall fought as a security officer and as a woman; working at the Smithsonian as compared to working for a private company; challenging aspects of her job; the changes she has seen at the Smithsonian; her work in developing security at the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum in New York; working at different Smithsonian museums; what working at the Smithsonian meant to her; her favorite exhibits and areas in the NMAA; and her memories of the Festival of American Folklife.

FAF/SM96-093 - Sharon Rohnback, July 4, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 9 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Sharon Rohnback was interviewed by Dorothy Blink on July 4, 1996. She was born in Iowa in 1945 and moved to Washington, DC, in 1968. She now works as a computer programs analyst and is a visitor at the Smithsonian.
This interview discusses what Rohnback knew of the Smithsonian before visiting, her first visit to the Smithsonian in 1968, visits to the Zoo, her favorite exhibits, coming to the Smithsonian with her family, memories of the Festival of American Folklife, her comments on the Iowa and "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibits at the1996 Festival of American Folklife, the Festival as a part of the Smithsonian's programming, and the Silver Hill facility.
The tape quality of this interview is good.

FAF/SM96-094 - Raineldo Urriola, July 4, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 45 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Raineldo Urriola was interviewed by Eduardo Contreras on July 4, 1996. The interview was conducted in Spanish. Urriola works for the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama.

FAF/SM96-095 - Sheila E. Cogan, July 4, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 16 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Sheila E. Cogan was interviewed by Dorothy Blink on July 4, 1996. Cogan was born in Washington, DC, and currently lives in Silver Spring, Maryland. She was an intern at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) in the summer of 1963.
This interview discusses Cogan's internship, including the projects she worked on, what the museum was like in the early 1960s, and the NMNH's work on both old and new exhibits; the programs for government interns under President Kennedy; the March on Washington at the end of the summer and how that affected Cogan's life; and her memories of the Folklife Festivals.

FAF/SM96-096 - Jim Galvin and Barbara Manioc, July 4, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 23 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Jim Galvin and Barbara Manioc were interviewed by Olivia Cadaval on July 4, 1996. Galvin was born in Washington, DC, and has been a volunteer at the Festival of American Folklife for 5 years. Manioc has been a volunteer at the Festival of American Folklife for 10 years.
This interview discusses Galvin's and Manioc's work as volunteers at the Festival of American Folklife, why Galvin volunteers, the staff and other volunteers that Manioc sees every year, Galvin's and Manioc's favorite festivals, the USSR at the 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Galvin's retelling of a Festival participant's stories, Galvin's hopes for future Festivals, Manioc's first visit to the Smithsonian, and their perception of the relationship between Festival volunteers and the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-097 - Adriana McMurray, July 4, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 7 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Adriana McMurray was interviewed by Pam Henson on July 4, 1996. McMurray is 14 years old and will be entering the 9th grade at Duke Ellington High School in the fall. She has been a frequent visitor to the Smithsonian since she was a toddler.
This interview discusses McMurray's interests in the visual arts, music, and history; the Vermeer exhibit; special tours with school groups; her memories of Folklife Festivals; comments on the Festival as a part of the Smithsonian's programming; exhibits at the National Museum of American History; and her career plans.

FAF/SM96-098 - Lori Schlenker, July 5, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 21 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Lori Schlenker was interviewed by Eduardo Contreras on July 5, 1996. Born in Pennsylvania in 1969, Schlenker grew up in Maine. She majored in anthropology in college and planned to have a career in museum work. She came to work at the Smithsonian in January 1991as an intern in the Move Office of the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). She worked in the Division of Birds for a short time and is now a museum specialist at NMNH.
This interview discusses Schlenker's work as an intern; why the Smithsonian is a good place to work; the damage to the Museum Support Center in Suitland, Maryland, in 1992; her work on the recovery project; memorable aspects of her career at the Smithsonian; her first memory of a museum; an experience in high school that led her to museum work; challenges of working at the Smithsonian; changes at the Smithsonian; learning about the Smithsonian's structure; comments on the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit; and memories of her first Festival.

FAF/SM96-099 - Judy Chelnick, July 5, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 20 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Judy Chelnick was interviewed by Marvette Perez on July 5, 1996. Chelnick was born in Toledo, Ohio, in 1953. She worked at the Deitrich Museum of Medical History in Cleveland, Ohio for several years before coming to work at the Smithsonian in November 1987. Chelnick currently works in the Medical Sciences Collections in the Division of Science, Medicine, andSociety at the National Museum of American History (NMAH).
This interview discusses Chelnick's work at the Deitrich Museum of Medical History, background information on the medical collection at the NMAH, anecdotes about her work at the Smithsonian, how she came to work at the Smithsonian, previous visits to the museums, her first impressions about working at the Smithsonian, her first few days of work, a typical day of work, her current research in the Bristol-Meyers-Squib Collection, challenges of the job, differences between the Smithsonian and other museums, visiting the museums when she is not working, and comments on the Festival of American Folklife. She mentions colleagues from the Deitrich Museum of Medical History and Ray Kondratas, Mark Dreyfus, Betty Sharpe, Terry Sharrer, Catherine Perge, Spencer Crew, Ray Hutt, and Cathy Gold of the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-100 - Elizabeth Zimmer, July 5, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 15 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Elizabeth Zimmer was interviewed by Marvette Perez on July 5, 1996. Born in Rochester, New York, in 1951, Zimmer was a member of the faculty at Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge. She began working at the Smithsonian in June 1990 and is a research biologist at the Laboratory of Molecular Systematics. She taught at Cal Tech while on sabbatical in 1993-1994.
This interview discusses the type of work that Zimmer does, who she works with at the Smithsonian, how she got her job, her visits to the Smithsonian prior to working here, her fist day on the job, a typical day of work, her involvement in the 150thanniversary activities at the Smithsonian, the course of her career at the Smithsonian, her work with fellows and graduate students, a comparison of the Smithsonian to academia, challenging aspects of her job, changes she has seen at the Smithsonian, reminiscences about working at the Smithsonian, what working at the Smithsonian means to Zimmer, and her memories of the Folklife Festivals. Zimmer mentions colleagues Mike Braun and Dave Swofford.

FAF/SM96-101 - Edgar Farley, July 5, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 6 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Edgar Farley was interviewed by Marvette Perez on July 5, 1996. Farley was born in 1925 in Baltimore, Maryland. He completed high school and served in the Navy for four years, then worked for a trucking company for 10 years. He then worked for Bethlehem Steel for 30 years before retiring. Farley first visited the Smithsonian in the early 1930s and is now a regular visitor.
This interview discusses Farley's career, his first visit to the Smithsonian in the early 1930s, memories of favorite Folklife Festivals, favorite museums and exhibits, his comments on the 1996 Festival of American Folklife, and his visits to the Zoo.

FAF/SM96-102 - Helen Gaul, July 5, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 37 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Helen Gaul was interviewed by Catherine Perge on July 5, 1996. She was born in Reading, Pennsylvania, in 1943 and moved to Washington, DC, in 1965 after completing college. Beginning in 1977, Gaul started volunteering for the Zoo, and she is still active in their animal studies. Gaul works as an accountant for a broadcasting company.
This interview discusses how Gaul got involved in the volunteer program at the Zoo; the various animal study projects in which she has participated, including lesser and giant pandas, Atlas lions, seals, golden lion tamarin monkeys, and cheetahs; the Zoo's programs for species preservation and reintroduction to the wild; her visits abroad; changes in the Zoo's volunteer program; the new Amazonia exhibit and Think Tank project; the Smithsonian and the Zoo as resources for the public; her visits to the Smithsonian museums on the Mall; memories of the Folklife Festival; challenging and memorable moments in her volunteer work; and the relationship between Zoo volunteers and the staff. Gaul mentions Zoo staff members Devra Kleiman, Dr. Benjamin Beck, Stuart Wells, and Rob Shumaker.

FAF/SM96-103 - Barbara Moore, July 5, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 9 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Barbara Moore was interviewed by Catherine Perge on July 5, 1996. Moore was born in Atlanta, Georgia, in 1941 and now resides in Reston, Virginia. She is a professional photographer and a frequent visitor to the Smithsonian.
This interview discusses Moore's first visit to the Smithsonian at the age of 16; stories about her grandparents William Woodland Wallis and Florence Virginia George, both Smithsonian employees at the turn of the century; her favorite exhibits; what the Smithsonian means to her; changes she has seen at the Smithsonian; and memories of the Festival of American Folklife.

FAF/SM96-104 - Mary McCutcheon, July 5, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 27 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Mary McCutcheon was interviewed by Eduardo Contreras on July 5, 1996. McCutcheon was born in 1947 in Chicago, Illinois, and studied anthropology in college, specializing in Micronesia. She came to work at the Smithsonian in the fall of 1978 and stayed until 1980 when she finished her dissertation. McCutcheon currently teaches anthropology at George Mason University and does research on a contract basis for the Smithsonian.
This interview discusses the different jobs McCutcheon has held; how she came to work for the Smithsonian in 1978; her work on the collections inventory at the National Museum of Natural History, specifically with the SELGEM files and the database software; colleagues Saul Riesenberg, Vince Wilcox, Johanna Humphrey, Paul Taylor, and Adrienne Kaeppler; reminiscences about working at the Smithsonian; being interviewed by "PM Magazine"; and collecting a gecko species for Smithsonian herpetologists while doing anthropological fieldwork.

FAF/SM96-105 - Anita Buffaloe, July 5, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 37 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Anita Buffaloe was interviewed by Marvette Perez on July 5, 1996. Buffaloe was born in Washington, DC, in 1945 and began working at the Federal Trade Commission. She stopped working to raise her children and returned to the workforce in 1973 when she was hired at the Smithsonian. Buffaloe began in the Clerical Resources Pool and worked in various offices. She left the Smithsonian for two years to work as a nurse, but then returned to the Clerical Resources Pool. She now works as an administrative assistant and passport and visa agent in the Office of International Relations.
This interview discusses Buffaloe's work in the Office of Museum Programs; memories of her singing at Christmas parties and her involvement in planning several Christmas programs; how she came to work for the Smithsonian; the course of her career; the changes in technology and how that has affected her job; visiting the Smithsonian and the Mall as a child; her first impressions of the Smithsonian as a visitor; her first day on the job; changes in racial diversity and women workers at the Smithsonian; a typical day of work; what the Office of International Relations does and Buffaloe's role in the office; stories about working at the Smithsonian; what working at the Smithsonian means to her; visiting the museums when she is not working; memories of the Festival of American Folklife and its importance to her family; and comments on the current Folklife Festival and the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit. Buffaloe mentions Smithsonian employees Elena Borowski, Fred Schmidt, Paul Perrot, Robert Organ, Janet Solinger, Harold Blackfoot, Barbara Moelter, Bernice Abram, Laverne Love, Archie Gremit, Howard Toy, Patrick Sears, Francine Berkowitz, and Saundra Thomas in this interview.

FAF/SM96-106 - Ramunas "Ray" Kondratas, July 5, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 56 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Ramunas "Ray" Kondratas was interviewed by Catherine Perge on July 5, 1996. Born in Germany in 1948, Kondratas moved to the United States with his family in 1952. He studied at Harvard and came to work at the Smithsonian in 1977. Kondratas is currently the Head Curator in the Department of History and the Chair and Curator in the Division of Science, Medicine, and Society at the National Museum of American History (NMAH).
This interview discusses Kondratas's education at Harvard; how he came to work at the Smithsonian; projects during his first years of work; a description of the medical collections at the Smithsonian; his involvement with video and film documentation funded by a grant from the Sloan Foundation; current projects; how his job has changed; a typical day of work; changes at the NMAH; his work on the "Search for Life" exhibit with Terry Shearer; the advantages of the Smithsonian name; challenges of his job; his visits to the Smithsonian as a child; stories of working at the Smithsonian; and reflections on his career, the staff, and the Smithsonian. This interview mentions colleagues Dr. Audrey Davis, Michael Harris, Everett Jackson, Terry Sharrer, and Catherine Hutt.

FAF/SM96-108 - Ruth Selig, July 5, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 77 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Ruth Selig was interviewed by Pam Henson on July 5, 1996. Selig was born in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1942. She earned her bachelors degree in history at Wellesley College and then spent two years in teacher training, first at Shady Hill School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and then at Harvard, where she earned her Masters of Arts in Teaching in history and social sciences. Selig also holds a masters degree in anthropology from George Washington University (GWU). Selig taught in secondary education for ten years before coming to work at the Smithsonian in July 1975. She began her Smithsonian career in the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). From 1978-1983, Selig was primarily focused on the teacher training courses in anthropology which she helped to design and run. She then moved to Wyoming in June 1983 and created a similar program there, in conjunction with the Smithsonian. Returning to Washington, DC, Selig resumed her work at the Smithsonian in 1985. Shortly thereafter, she became the special assistant to Jim Tyler, Deputy Director and Acting Director of the NMNH. Next, Selig worked for Bob Hoffman in the Director's office. As Hoffman was promoted to Assistant Secretary of Research, Selig moved with him. Selig is now a Program Officer in the Office of the Provost.
This interview discusses Selig's education; the work she does currently; how she came to the Smithsonian; her first job at the Smithsonian and its challenges; the expansion of her position to include education kits; the temporary loss of her job; her work on the book Smithsonian Experience; her work in creating and facilitating a teacher training program in anthropology with GWU colleagues; her continuing work on education kits; he rmove to Wyoming and how she started and ran a similar teacher training program at the University of Wyoming; her return to Washington, DC, and the Smithsonian; the course of her career since her return; her close work with Jim Tyler and Bob Hoffman; how her job changed each time she moved; the numerous projects in which she has been involved, notably the first McKinsey study; and the beginning of Anthro Notes and its continuing success.
The interview continues with Selig's assessment of her educational work at the Smithsonian, the Smithsonian as compared to public schools and universities, and her father as her role model. Selig's interview mentions colleagues Bill Fitzhugh, William Sturtevant, Ann Bay, Jack Ewers, Herman Viola, Bruce Craig, Cordelia Benedict, Ann Hough, Jim Mello, George Frison, Loretta Fowler, Dick Fiske, Bob Hoffman, Jim Tyler, Stan Shetler, Ann Levin, Dan Goodwin, and Ross Simons and discusses their work in connection with her own.

FAF/SM96-109 - Marvette Perez, July 5, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 40 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Marvette Perez was interviewed by Martin Collins on July 5, 1996. Perez was born in Puerto Rico in 1961. She earned the B.S. in social psychology, the M.S. in anthropology, and is a Ph.D. candidate in anthropology. She came to the Smithsonian in 1987 as an intern in the Division of Community Life at the National Museum of American History (NMAH). Her work as an intern lasted for one and a half years, and she then began working at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) under contract. Perez also worked at the S. Dillon Ripley International Center and did fieldwork in Puerto Rico before returning to the Smithsonian in 1991. She is currently the curator in the Division of Cultural History in the NMAH and is the first Latino curator at the Smithsonian.
This interview discusses Perez's education, how she came to work at the Smithsonian, issues she has had to confront as a Latino at the Smithsonian, the reorganization of the NMAH in 1993 and her work with the Community Studies Task Force committee, her work with the collections, her major accomplishment in acquiring a large collection of Puerto Rican objects and her plans for that collection, exhibits she has worked on, her involvement with the ethnic imagery project by Fath Ruffins, a typical day at work, and colleagues Richard Ahlborn, Charlie McGovern, Barbara Clark Smith, Steve Lubar, Niani Kilkenny, and Bernice Reagon.

FAF/SM96-110 - Steven Lubar, July 5, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 14 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Steven Lubar was interviewed by Odette Diaz on July 5, 1996. Lubar was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1954. He received the Ph.D. in history from the University of Chicago and worked at the Charles River Museum of Industry outside of Boston, Massachusetts for a few years. He then was hired as an historian for the "Engines of Change" exhibit at the Smithsonian in October 1982. His temporary position became a permanent job, and Lubar is now the curator of the History of Technology at the National Museum of American History (NMAH).
This interview discusses Lubar's work at the Smithsonian; how objects are collected at the museum; changes at the NMAH and the Smithsonian; how he came to work for the Smithsonian; his first day of work; the course of his career; a comparison of the Smithsonian to academia; challenging aspects of his job; what working at the Smithsonian means to him; stories about his work on the 1994 exhibit in Japan and with the John Bull locomotive; and colleagues Lonnie Bunch, Ellen Hughes,and Nigel Briggs.

FAF/SM96-111 - Reuben Jackson, July 5, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 22 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Reuben Jackson was interviewed by Odette Diaz on July 5, 1996. He was born in Augusta, Georgia, in 1956 and began his career at the Smithsonian in April 1980 in the gift shop of the National Air and Space Museum (NASM). After completing the M.L.S. at the University of the District of Columbia in 1983, Jackson worked in library acquisitions at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH); from 1985-1987 he worked as a library technician at the National Museum of African Art (NMAfA). From February 1987 until April 1989 Jackson worked for the DC Public Libraries; he then returned to the Smithsonian to work as an archivist in the Duke Ellington Collection at the Archives Center of the National Museum of American History.
This interview discusses the course of Jackson's career at the Smithsonian, the work he did at the gift shop of NASM, his first impressions of working at the Smithsonian, how his perception of the Smithsonian changed as he changed jobs, his childhood memories of the Smithsonian, his first day at the NASM gift shop, a typical day of work now, working with the other Smithsonian staff, the work environment of the Smithsonian compared to the DC Public Libraries, changes in the Smithsonian, Jackson's comments on racism and hiring at the Smithsonian, what working at the Smithsonian means to him, and several anecdotes about meeting famous people while working at the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-112 - L. Susan Tolbert, July 5, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 23 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
L. Susan Tolbert was interviewed by Odette Diaz on July 5, 1996. She was born in Washington in 1952 and came to work at the Smithsonian in August 1977. She began as a clerk typist in the Conservation Analytical Laboratory (CAL) and transferred to the Division of Transportation at the National Museum of American History in 1980. She was promoted several times and is now a senior museum specialist in technology, specializing in the railroad collection.
This interview discusses the course of Tolbert's career; the work she did at the CAL; projects she has worked on at NMAH, notably the running of the John Bull locomotive; how she came to work at the Smithsonian; visiting the Smithsonian prior to working there and her first impressions; her first day of work; the type of work she does now; a typical day of work; the Smithsonian's workplace compared to a private company; changes Tolbert has seen at the Smithsonian; what working at the Smithsonian means to her; and colleagues Zelma Coleman,[Montague] "Monty" Smith, Robert Organ, and Carol Callahan from CAL and Jack White, Bob Post, John Stine, Roger White, Betsy Branagoh, and Jim Knowles from NMAH.

FAF/SM96-113 - Margaret Santiago, July 5, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 48 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Margaret Santiago was interviewed by Marvette Perez on July 5, 1996. She was born in Charlotte, North Carolina, in 1931 and attended college for a year before getting married. After10 years as a housewife, she came to work at the Smithsonian in 1960. She began her 30 year career as a roving clerk typist and worked in several different offices before gaining a permanent position in the Smithsonian Office of the Registrar. Santiago was promoted within this office and eventually became the registrar in the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). She retired in December 1990.
This interview discusses how Santiago got her job, where and with whom she worked as a roving clerk typist, the work she did initially under Margaret Wadsworth in the Office of the Registrar, her battles for each promotions, how Santiago confronted racism at the Smithsonian, the numerous projects on which Santiago worked, her legal case and its outcome, and the scholarship that was created in her name.

FAF/SM96-114 - Katharine Landfield, July 5, 1996.

Box 1 of 10
Total recording time: 30 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Katharine Landfield was interviewed by Martin Collins on July 5, 1996. Landfield was born in Maryland in 1968 and grew up in Washington, DC. She attended Amherst College for her undergraduate degree and received the M.S.W. from Catholic University. Landfield now works as a school social worker with the Alternative School System in Fairfax, Virginia. Landfield has been a volunteer at the Festival of American Folklife for two years.
This interview discusses how Landfield got involved in volunteering for the Festival, her visits to the Smithsonian as a child, what she does as a volunteer, her memories of visiting the Mall, her parents' involvement with the Smithsonian, her reflections on the Festival and its importance, memorable stories about volunteering at the Festival, her personal observations about the participants, and several reminiscences about visiting the Smithsonian.

Box 2

FAF/SM96-115 - Cordelia Rose, July 5, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 50 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Cordelia Rose was interviewed by Tom Lawrence on July 5, 1996. Rose began her career at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, where she spent ten years. She subsequently worked at the National Museums of Kenya and the Museum of American Folkart in New York City before coming to work at the Smithsonian. Rose is the registrar at the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum and has worked there since 1982.
This interview discusses Rose's schooling; the course of her career; how she came to work at the Smithsonian; the types of training necessary for work as a registrar; the work a registrar does; changes in registrarial work due to computers; the challenges of shipping objects; professional relationships with other registrars and museums; traveling with the objects; her collaborative work with the Office of Protection Services; the phrase book which Rose designed specifically for couriers of objects; and stories of her work in Kenya, at the Smithsonian, and with the Festival of India.

FAF/SM96-116 - Holly Wright, July 5, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 29 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Holly Wright was interviewed by Pam Henson on July 5, 1996. Wright was born in Virginia in 1956 and spent two years at Virginia Tech. She began her career at the Smithsonian in the early 1970s by volunteering at the Festival of American Folklife. She had a paid position at the 1976Bicentennial Festival and then left the Smithsonian for several years. Wright became a permanent member of the Horticulture Services Division in 1991 and now manages the Mary Livingston Ripley garden.
This interview discusses the course of Wright's career; how she came to work at the Smithsonian; her memories of volunteering at the Festival; school trips to the Smithsonian; how her gardening interest developed; her training; a typical day at work; what she likes about her job; the challenges of her work; the collective personality of the Smithsonian Horticultural staff; her job at the Smithsonian as compared to her other jobs; issues of safety when working in a public setting; and Wright's reflections on her work at the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-117 - David Jickling, July 6, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 13 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
David Jickling was interviewed by Felix Lapinski on July 6, 1996. Jickling moved to the Washington, DC, area in 1955 for his job with the Navy Department, and his family visited the Smithsonian regularly. Jickling is now a volunteer at the Postal Museum.
This interview discusses Jickling's first visit to the Smithsonian in 1946; the landscape of the Mall in the 1950s;working on the Mall and visiting the museums over lunch; his favorite museums; his visits to the many Smithsonian museums and facilities, including the National Museum of the American Indian in New York City and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama; his daughter's career at the Hirshhorn and Cooper-Hewitt Museums; Jickling's work as a volunteer at the Postal Museum; which sections of the museum his tours cover; visitors' reactions to the museum; Smithsonian Resident Associates trips; and family.

FAF/SM96-118 - Doug Wonderlic, July 6, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 26 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Doug Wonderlic was interviewed by Jen Page on July 6, 1996. Wonderlic was born in 1938 and worked for a private architectural firm and the General Services Administration before coming to work for the Smithsonian. He is a planner in the Office of Physical Plant and has worked at the Smithsonian for 13 years.
This interview discusses the work which Wonderlic does, the projects he has worked on, where he works, stories of seeing unusual areas of the museums, how he came to work at the Smithsonian, his first day on the job and his first impressions of the Smithsonian as a workplace, a typical day of work, a description of the National Air and Space Museum extension at Dulles International Airport project, working at the Smithsonian as compared to a private company or government agency, challenging aspects of the job, changes at the Smithsonian, his work at the National Museum of the American Indian in New York City, what working at the Smithsonian means to him, visiting the museums when he is not working, Wonderlic's memories of the Festival of American Folklife, and his comments on the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit.

FAF/SM96-119 - Nancy Pope, July 6, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 17 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Nancy Pope was interviewed by Felix Lapinski on July 6, 1996. She worked at the Library of Congress prior to working at the Smithsonian. She began her career at the Institution in October 1984 in the National Philatelic Collection of the National Museum of American History. Pope now works at the National Postal Museum.
This interview discusses how Pope got her job, her first day at work, her supervisor Reidar Norby, her early projects with the National Philatelic Collection, the beginnings of the National Postal Museum and Pope's role in its creation, a description and history of the collection, the goals of the museum, the history and significance of several artifacts in the museum, the history of the Postal Museum's building, and the Postal Museum's plans for the 150th birthday party.

FAF/SM96-120 - Rita Warpeha, July 6, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 18 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Rita Warpeha was interviewed by Jen Page on July 6, 1996. Born in Minnesota, in 1940, Warpeha worked for the Peace Corps and the Library of Congress before coming to work for the Smithsonian in January1993. She began working in a temporary position and, within 6 months, was hired on a permanent basis. She is now a resource/database specialist with the National Science Resources Center (NSRC).
This interview discusses how Warpeha came to work for the Smithsonian, the history and purpose of the NSRC, her work for that office, the benefits of being a Smithsonian employee, a typical day of work, the projects she is currently working on, working with colleagues Doug Lapp and Sally Shuler, how her job has changed, working for the Smithsonian as compared to a government job, what working at the Smithsonian means to her, memories of the Festival of American Folklife, her first contact with the Smithsonian through Resident Associates courses, and an anecdote about Warpeha's contact with the NSRC before she came to work there.

FAF/SM96-121 - Virginia McCawley, July 6, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 30 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Virginia McCawley was interviewed by Eduardo Contreras on July 6, 1996. McCawley was born in San Francisco, California, in 1950 and moved to Washington, DC, in 1974. Her most recent job was working as a correctional officer at the Prince George's County Jail. McCawley has been a volunteer at the Festival of American Folklife for 15 years. At the 1996 Festival, McCawley worked on the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit in a temporary paid position, from May until July.
This interview discusses McCawley's work for the Festival this year; her past volunteer work, primarily in the kitchen demonstrations; working with Betty Belanus, Lori Sommers, Richard Kennedy, Sally Brodie, Beverly Simon, Marjorie Hunt, and Emily Botein; her stories about volunteering at the Festival; why she started volunteering; her accomplishments as a volunteer; challenging aspects of her work with the Festival; how the Smithsonian staff has changed, specifically in the Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies; and how the Festival has changed.

FAF/SM96-122 - Lee Glassco, July 6, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 26 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Lee Glassco was interviewed by Jen Page on July 6, 1996. Glassco was born in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1931. She was graduated from the veterinary technology program at Northern Virginia Community College in 1983 and is now a retired veterinary technician. She has been a volunteer at the Zoo for 22 years. From 1974 until 1983, Glassco was a guide, first doing general tours, then working as a house guide in the elephant and giraffe house. Later, Glassco participated in the animal and behavioral studies. Beginning in 1994, Glassco began working with a new Zoo volunteer program called Zoo on Wheels.
This interview discusses how Glassco started volunteering; her decision to go back to school; how her participation in Zoo volunteer work changed over the years; her work with the Zoo on Wheels program; her first impressions of the Zoo; how her opinions of all zoos have changed; her first day of work; the most challenging part of her job as a guide; stories about working at the Zoo; changes at the Zoo, both in its appearance and in the collections; what working at the Smithsonian means to her; her experiences with Zoo on Wheels; and her memories and impressions of the Festival of American Folklife.

FAF/SM96-123 - Betty Belanus, July 6, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 14 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Betty Belanus was interviewed by Eduardo Contreras on July 6, 1996. Belanus was born in New Jersey in 1955 and is a folklorist at the Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (CFPCS). Belanus began her association with the Smithsonian in 1986 when she was a presenter for the program on Tennessee at the Festival of American Folklife (FAF). She was then hired full time in May 1987 to begin working on the Massachusetts portion of the 1988 Festival. Belanus continued to work for the CFPCS on contract, curating the Family Farm exhibit at the 1991 FAF, serving as the stage manager for the White House Workers program in 1992, and working with Olivia Cadaval on the Borderlands program at the 1993 FAF. In October 1994, she and Marjorie Hunt were hired under a job share agreement in which each works 20 hours a week. Most recently, Belanus, Hunt, and Emily Botein curated the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit at the 1996 FAF.
This interview discusses how Belanus got involved with the Tennessee program of the 1986 FAF, the work she did as she curated the Massachusetts program for the 1988 FAF, how her career progressed, the projects she worked on between 1988 and 1994, her favorite Festival stories, and her accomplishments in connecting the CFPCS with the educational initiative of the Smithsonian and creating several educational outreach kits. The interview also covers the differences between other museums and the Smithsonian, the challenges of her job, and how the Smithsonian and the CFPCS have changed.

FAF/SM96-124 - William Gagham, July 6, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 17 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
William Gagham was interviewed by Eduardo Contreras on July 6, 1996. Gagham was born in 1947 in Washington, DC, and he came to work at the Smithsonian in 1984 as a security officer. Gagham has worked in the Hirshhorn and the Freer museums and is also a member of the Smithsonian's Women's Council, an advocacy group for women.
This interview discusses how Gagham came to work at the Smithsonian, stories from his job, a typical day of work, how security officers often become docents when they interact with visitors, the potential danger which he faces while working, and what is most challenging in Gagham's job, how the Smithsonian and its security have changed, what Gagham would like to see incorporated into the Smithsonian's programming, memories of the Festival of American Folklife, and reactions to the"Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit. The interview also covers Gagham's participation with the Smithsonian's Women's Council, why he got involved, and how it has affected and changed him.

FAF/SM96-125 - Leonard Hirsch, July 6, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 36 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Leonard "Len" Hirsch was interviewed by Eduardo Contreras on July 6, 1996. Hirsch was born in New York City in 1955 and came to the Smithsonian in 1988. His position was a one year replacement, but a permanent position was created for him. He is now the International Liaison in the Office of International Relations. Hirsch was instrumental in starting the Smithsonian's Lesbian and Gay issues Committee in 1989 and the Federal Gay Lesbian and Bisexual Employees Group a few years later, of which he is now the president. He is also the chair of the Electronic Communications Committee. Hirsch teaches part time at George Mason University.
This interview discusses how Hirsch came to the Smithsonian; what the Office of International Relations does; Hirsch's job; his involvement with computer issues in his office; his role in the Smithsonian's Lesbian and Gay Issues Committee and the Federal Gay Lesbian and Bisexual Employees Group; stories about working at the Smithsonian; gay, lesbian, and bisexual visibility in museums and how Hirsch hopes this will change in the future; what Hirsch finds most challenging about his job; his thoughts on the Festival of American Folklife and the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit; the Smithsonian as compared to other government and private agencies; criticisms and praise of the Smithsonian; and how the public learns from exhibits.

FAF/SM96-126 - Chuck Woolf, July 6, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 35 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Chuck Woolf was interviewed by Jen Page on July 6, 1996. He was born in 1945 in Colorado and came to work at the Smithsonian in February 1985. Woolf works as a sheet metal mechanic at the National Zoo.
This interview discusses what Woolf's job entails, who he works with, stories about working at the Zoo, how he came to work at the Smithsonian, his visits to the museums and the Zoo as a child, his first impressions of the Smithsonian as a worker, the variety of his job, his first day of work, changes at the Zoo and the Smithsonian, his favorite animals, working with the public, challenges of his job, what working at the Smithsonian means to him, his visits to the museums when he is not working, and his impressions of the 1996 Festival of American Folklife.

FAF/SM96-127 - Volkor K. Schmeissner, July 6, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 24 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Volkor K. Schmeissner was interviewed by John McKiernan Gonzalez on July 6, 1996. Schmeissner was born in 1935 in Stuttgart, Germany. He is a professor of German language and culture and is associated with the German Heritage Society of Greater Washington, DC, and the Society of German American Studies. Schmeissner first visited the Smithsonian in 961.
This interview discusses the work of the German Heritage Society of Greater Washington, DC; Adolf Cluss, the German American architect of the Castle; the other German American architects who built parts of Washington, DC; the disappearance of German American heritage and the rise of other ethnic heritage groups; Schmeissner's comments on the worldwide reputation of the Smithsonian; his numerous visits to the Smithsonian; his involvement with the German Heritage Society; his memories of the Festival of American Folklife; his visits to the Zoo; and what Schmeissner would include about Cluss in the Smithsonian's 150th anniversary book.

FAF/SM96-128 - Vincent Van Allen, July 6, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 18 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Vincent Van Allen was interviewed by Felix Lapinski on July 6, 1996. Van Allen is from Brooklyn, New York, and came to Washington, DC, in 1959. He has been a frequent visitor to the Smithsonian museums since that time.
This interview discusses Van Allen's visits to the Smithsonian, the Hirshhorn as his favorite museum, his own sculpture work, numerous sculptors and painters who are among Van Allen's favorites, and favorite sculptures at the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-129 - Janice Whigham, July 6, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 10 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Janice Whigham was interviewed by Felix Lapinski on July 6, 1996. Whigham lives in Crofton, Maryland, with her husband Dennis, who works for the Smithsonian Environmental Resource Center (SERC). They moved to the Washington, DC, area from Lawrenceville, New Jersey, where Mr. Whigham was teaching at Rider College. Both Mr. and Mrs. Whigham are biologists, and Mrs. Whigham is a frequent visitor to the Smithsonian.
This interview discusses how often the Whighams visit the Smithsonian, her first visit to the Smithsonian in the mid 1970s, her first impressions of the Smithsonian, what SERC does, which museums Whigham likes, and the tours which are available at the SERC facilities.

FAF/SM96-130 - Deborah Rothberg, July 6, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 20 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Deborah Rothberg was interviewed by Jen Page on July 6, 1996. Rothberg was born in Fort Wayne, Indiana, in 1948; she was educated at the University of Wisconsin and came to Washington, DC, to work for a Congressman. After three and a half years of working in politics, Rothberg came to the Smithsonian in July 1974. Starting as a part time secretary in the Office of Education in the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), Rothberg remained in the same office and is now a public programmer.
This interview discusses the changes in location of her office, Smithsonian staff with whom she has worked, how she came to work at the Smithsonian, her first impressions of working at the Smithsonian, memories of her first day of work, a typical day of work when Rothberg first started, what her job encompasses now, her work on several committees at the Smithsonian, and programs she is involved in planning. The interview also covers changes at the Smithsonian, the Smithsonian as an employer as compared to a private company or government agency, what is most challenging about her job, what working at the Smithsonian means to her, visiting the museums when she is not working, an unusual encounter with Secretary I. Michael Heyman, her influences and interests as a child, comments on the 1996 Festival of American Folklife and the 150th anniversary celebration, and memories of the Festival of American Folklife.
This interview is restricted; researchers must have Rothberg's express permission to use this interview during her lifetime.

FAF/SM96-131 - David Mowery, July 6, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 26 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
David Mowery was interviewed by David Bosserman on July 6, 1996. Mowery was born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1947 and was raised in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He majored in political science, urban affairs, and American studies in college. He moved to Washington, DC, in 1976. Mowery has worked in the various levels of government and has been a frequent visitor to the Smithsonian since 1976. He has been involved in the Resident Associates program and has worked as a volunteer for the Smithsonian's Jazz Program and at the Festival of American Folklife.
This interview discusses Mowery's memories of the Festival of American Folklife; his membership with the Resident Associates; his work on the Board of Directors of Let 'Em Play, Inc.; the volunteer work he did for the Jazz Program under James R. Taylor and Martin.

FAF/SM96-132 - Maggie Bertin, July 6, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 16 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Maggie Bertin was interviewed by David Bosserman on July 6, 1996. Bertin has worked at the Smithsonian since 1983, starting at the National Museum of African Art (NMAfA). She moved to the office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Service in 1987, and in early 1996 she began working at the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI).
This interview discusses Bertin's memories of working at the Smithsonian, her work for the NMAfA, how she came to work in the office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Service (OASPS), her association with Jeffrey LaRiche, Ralph Rinzler, James Early, and Bob Dierker, her work in the OASPS, the mission statement of the NMAI and the work it is currently doing, her being white and working at a museum for Native Americans, her interview with NMAI director Rick West, the policies and the future of the NMAI, fund raising for the NMAI, and her view of the Smithsonian's future.

FAF/SM96-133 - David Bosserman, July 6, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 11 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
David Bosserman was interviewed by Maggie Bertin on July 6, 1996. Bosserman lived in the Midwest before moving to Washington, DC, 20 years ago. He is a physicist for the Army and works in the Night Vision Laboratory at Fort Belvoir. His wife Olivia Cadaval works for the Smithsonian in the Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (CFPCS). Bosserman has worked as a volunteer at the Festival of American Folklife (FAF) for a number of years.
This interview discusses Bosserman's memories of the beginnings of the FAF, where his interest in folklife originated, his memories of the Smithsonian, how his wife's interests and his own intersect, his work at the FAF, visiting Smithsonian and other museums, the Glen Echo Folk Festival, the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit, his own and his community's relationship to the Zoo and the Smithsonian, the future of the Smithsonian and the CFPCS, and how the FAF reaches the entire United States.

FAF/SM96-134 - Elaine Hodges, July 6, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 42 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Elaine Hodges was interviewed by Jen Page on July 6, 1996. Hodges was born in Washington, DC, in 1937, and she started working at the Smithsonian in 1965. She began as a personnel clerk and within six weeks, she held a position as a scientific illustrator. She first worked with J. Laurens Barnard in the Division of Crustacea in the Department of Invertebrate Zoology. Six months later, she was moved to the Lamont Street facility to work in the Division of Entomology. Hodges soon was working on the Southeast Asia Mosquito Project. Beginning in 1969, Hodges spent 4 years working at home on contract for the Smithsonian. She also went back to school to study entomology but did not complete the necessary course work. In September 1976, Hodges came back to work at the Smithsonian in the National Museum of Natural History. She plans to retire at the end of September.
This interview discusses the course of Hodges's career, how she came to work at the Smithsonian, how she got her job as a scientific illustrator, her impressions of visiting the Smithsonian as a child, working at the Smithsonian in the 1960s, the Smithsonian bowling leagues, working at Lamont Street in an off-Mall facility, how she met her husband at work, stories of working in personnel, and her first and last days working in Barnard's office. The interview also covers the Department of Entomology's move from Lamont Street to the NMNH and Hodges's role in designing the space for the Mosquito project; why she decided to continue her work at home; her return to the Smithsonian in 1976; who she worked with in Entomology; the work which Hodges is now engaged in; how her job has changed; and the many projects, committees, and exhibits she has worked on.
The interview continues with Hodges's assessment of the Smithsonian as compared to a private company, challenging aspects of her job, changes at the Smithsonian, what working at the Smithsonian means to her, her lack of visiting the museums, and reminiscences of working at the Smithsonian. This interview finishes with Hodges's observations about the Festival of American Folklife, the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit, her role as a presenter, and her conversations with co-presenter Carol Winkler of the Office of Education on his work and what the Smithsonian should be focusing on in the future.

FAF/SM96-135 - Melissa Darden, July 6, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 64 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Melissa Darden was interviewed by Pam Henson on July 6, 1996. Darden was born in Franklin, Louisiana, in 1968. She has lived on the Chitimacha reservation in Charenton, Louisiana, all of her life. Darden used to teach 5th-8th grade in math, science, and social studies, but she now works full time at a casino. Darden is a presenter at the 1996 Festival of American Folklife, where she is demonstrating her tribe's basket weaving traditions.
This interview discusses the beginning of her interest in basket weaving, other crafts she has done, how she learned to weave, her grandmother's influence on her, how she gets design ideas, how she learned to make certain basket styles, what characteristics make a Chitimacha basket, the different shapes of baskets and their traditional uses, the materials used for basket weaving, the names and descriptions of the basket patterns, other tribe members who knew how to weave, how she chooses her next basket, the extent to which she documents her work, the rest of the community's interest in the baskets, her son's interest in learning to weave baskets and his progress, how she finds time to engage in the weaving, the traditional basket weavers and those who weave now, and her demonstrations.
The interview also covers the future of the tradition in her tribe; information on her tribe's current size; the school on the reservation; who teaches at the school; how she feels about viewing her tribal material culture in museums; the tools she uses to weave; how weaving the baskets has affected her life; other traditional Chitimacha crafts; guarding her tradition of basket weaving; her grandmother's thoughts on her son's basket weaving; what aspects of Chitimacha culture and history she has researched; and what she hopes will materialize in the future, in terms of curriculum and public outreach.

FAF/SM96-136 - Bernard Howard, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 17 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Bernard Howard was interviewed by John Franklin on July 7, 1996. He was born and raised in the Washington, DC, area; attended High Point High School; and finished one and a half years at the University of the District of Columbia. He worked in numerous federal government offices, mainly the Department of Defense, before coming to work at the Smithsonian in March 1990. Howard first worked in the National Museum of American History as an elevator operator. He then entered the typing pool. In November 1991, Howard began anew position as a scheduler in the Education Department of the National Museum of African Art (NMAfA). He left the Smithsonian in September 1992 but returned in December 1994 as administrative assistant and receptionist in the Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (CFPCS). In addition to his duties as administrative assistant, he now handles all travel paperwork for the office. Howard also works part time as a bellman at the JW Marriot.
This interview discusses how Howard started his career at the Smithsonian, his impressions of the Smithsonian prior to working here, his childhood visits to the National Museum of Natural History, his first impressions of working at the Smithsonian, descriptions of the different offices in which Howard worked while a member of the typing pool, acquiring his computer skills, his move to the NMAfA, the work he did there, observations on scheduling tours and workshops for groups, his job at CFPCS, his growing interest in folklife, his comments on the office, memories of working at his first Folklife Festival, the people in the CFPCS office, comments on the 1996 Festival of American Folklife and a comparison of it to other Festivals, stories of working at the Smithsonian, and the Smithsonian as compared to other government agencies.

FAF/SM96-137 - Steven Bostwick, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 23 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Steven Bostwick was interviewed by David Bosserman on July 7, 1996. He earned an art degree in printmaking, and he and his wife moved to Washington, DC, from Massachusetts in 1991. Bostwick worked for a year and four months in the Library of Congress's Exhibits Office, and through this job he heard about the Festival of American Folklife. He has worked at the Festival of American Folklife for three seasons as a member of the crew. Bostwick was also employed at the Smithsonian in the Cabinet Shop of the Freer and Sackler Galleries. When not working for the Festival, Bostwick does the lighting for industrial videos.
This interview discusses Bostwick's first visit to the Smithsonian in 1963, his attendance at the Hirshhorn's Inaugural exhibition in 1974, his job at the Library of Congress, how he got his job at the Festival, the duration of his employment for the Festival, his job at the Freer and Sackler Galleries and why he left, comments on the differences in programming at the different Festivals, the relationship of crew members to one another, his technical recommendations for future Festivals, memories of the Festivals, his comments on the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit at the 1996 Festival of American Folklife, getting jobs at the Smithsonian by accident, and his plans for working at future Festivals.

FAF/SM96-138 - Harry Miller, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 30 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Harry Miller was interviewed by John Franklin on July 7, 1996. He was born in Takoma Park, Maryland and has lived in the Washington, DC, area all of his life. He is a carpenter and was trained on the job. He came to the Smithsonian 9 years ago and became a carpenter at the National Zoo. Miller spent a week as a presenter at the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit at the 1996 Festival of American Folklife.
This interview discusses Miller's training; the various jobs he has held; how he heard about the job at the Smithsonian; the work he does at the Zoo; how the animals can damage structures; the spring as a busy season; the number of carpenters at the Zoo; the carpenters' contributions to the new Amazonia exhibit; the types of objects he makes; the Smithsonian as compared to Miller's other jobs; working outside despite the weather; his favorite animals; the Think Tank, its purpose, and the work Miller and the carpenters did for that exhibit; the building of the cheetah area; the unique experience of working with animals; the relationship between the different shops at the Zoo; working with his brother, who is also a carpenter at the Zoo; upcoming projects; other work he has done at the Zoo; what items the public wears down; Busch Gardens Tampa and newer zoos as compared to the National Zoo; and Miller's attention to workmanship.
The interview continues with a discussion of Miller's role as a presenter at the1996 Festival of American Folklife, working in the different public setting of the Festival, and Miller's experiences as a presenter and his opportunity to learn about other facets of working at the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-139 - Richard Callwood, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 15 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Richard Callwood was interviewed by David Bosserman on July 7, 1996. Callwood is a resident of St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands and attended college in the 1950s in Washington, DC. Callwood was a school teacher and spent his summers in the United States. He was a presenter in the 1990 Festival of American Folklife as a woodworker, toymaker, and storyteller. He has returned to volunteer at the Festival every year since 1990 and works as a member of the crew.
This interview discusses Callwood's first visit to the Smithsonian, the1990 Festival of American Folklife, the relationship between the interviewer and the interviewee, the diverse culture of the Virgin Islands, their political situation under the U.S. government, the relationship between presenters and Smithsonian staff members, the work the crew does at the Festival, hurricanes and their effects on the Virgin Islands, how Callwood brought his wife into volunteering at the Festival, and his thoughts on the Smithsonian's role in society.

FAF/SM96-140 - Dick Ball, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 10 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Dick Ball was interviewed by David Bosserman on July 7, 1996. He has lived in Washington, DC, for 46 years and worked for 45 years as a structural engineer. Ball is an Information Specialist at the National Air and Space Museum (NASM). He has been volunteering at the Smithsonian for 5 years.
This interview discusses what an Information Specialist does, the training courses one takes to become an Information Specialist, why Ball wanted to volunteer, how he got involved, the relationships he has formed through working at the Smithsonian, the Festival of American Folklife, other museums he has visited, impressions of the Smithsonian, what he will do as he works during the 150th birthday party, his other volunteer work, strange questions he has been asked, dealing with the language barrier, the work of an Information Specialist as compared to that of a docent, care of the artifacts in the museum, and his previous interest in aeronautics.

FAF/SM96-141 - Cordelia Benedict, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 31 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Cordelia Benedict was interviewed by John Franklin on July 7, 1996. Originally from Chicago, Illinois, Benedict received the M.S. in anthropology from the University of Chicago. She first moved to Washington, DC, in 1976 but then lived abroad for several years; she became a permanent resident of Washington, DC, in 1985 when she began her career at the Smithsonian. Benedict was hired in a temporary capacity as a supervisor of the telephone information lines for Visitor Information & Associates Reception Center (VIARC). This position became permanent, and Benedict continues to fill this position.
This interview discusses Benedict's visits to the Smithsonian with her family, how she got her job, changes her staff has undergone, how information for visitors is organized now and how that has changed, the collaborative role of Jane Gardner and the Information Resource Division, the changes in office locations, the technology they now use, collecting information outside of the Smithsonian, different types of phone calls, how language barriers are handled, volunteers and their training, how they handle non-Smithsonian inquiries, and working at the Smithsonian as compared to working for a private company.

FAF/SM96-142 - Charles Tumosa, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 11 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Charles Tumosa was interviewed by David Bosserman on July 7, 1996. He is a senior research chemist at the Conservation Analytical Laboratory (CAL) of the Smithsonian and has worked there since August 1989. Prior to working for the Smithsonian, Tumosa was the head of the Criminalistics Laboratory for the Philadelphia Police Department.
This interview discusses what CAL does; the conclusions of their research regarding the Smithsonian's facilities ;humidity and its effect on different types of objects; publishing opportunities; collaborations between Tumosa and colleagues Marion Mecklenburg, Mark McCormick Goodhart, and David Erhardt; using their findings for practical purposes; the Smithsonian's attitude toward its objects; changes in technology which have affected the preservation field; a comparison of Tumosa's current job to his previous work with the Philadelphia Police Department; working with paintings; Tumosa's experiences at the Festival of American Folklife; and his opinion on the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit.

FAF/SM96-143 - Kenneth Mason, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 12 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Kenneth Mason was interviewed by John Franklin on July 7, 1996. He was born in Minnesota and grew up there. He moved to Washington, DC, in 1980 and joined the Resident Associates program. In 1983 Mason was hired to work in the Office of Telecommunications (OTC). He worked at the Smithsonian for three and a half years, primarily as the program engineer of Radio Smithsonian. Since leaving the Smithsonian, Mason has done freelance work and has been involved in radio development in Africa.
This interview discusses why Mason first joined the Resident Associates program, what Radio Smithsonian is, what a typical day of work during the Festival of American Folklife would be, the purpose of Radio Smithsonian, the three styles of audio-visual presentation at the Smithsonian, the broadcast range of Radio Smithsonian, Mason's background in radio, working in the basement of the National Museum of American History, his memories of working at the Smithsonian, the people he worked with at OTC, the variety of shows broadcast by the Smithsonian, challenges of the job, the work Mason has done since leaving the Smithsonian, visiting the Festival of American Folklife every year since 1980, and his comments on the 1996 Festival.

FAF/SM96-144 - Walter Kelly, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 35 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Walter Kelly was interviewed by David Bosserman and Olivia Cadaval on July 7, 1996. Kelly lives in Baltimore, Maryland, and has been a participant at the Festival of American Folklife since 1972. He sells watermelon from his wagons.
This interview discusses Kelly's role at the Festival, a description of the wagons he uses, the family tradition in selling, the origins and significance of the term "arabing", the different uses of the wagons, how he came to work at the Festival, what he expected of the first Festival, the opening parade of the Festival with Kelly in the front, a demonstration of his street call, what it was like to work in Baltimore selling produce in the streets, memories of Ralph Rinzler, how Kelly gets his wagons to the Festival, comparing working at the Festival to the streets of Baltimore, passing the traditional calls on to his grandchildren, and Festival memories.

FAF/SM96-145 - Amy Kotkin, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 16 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Amy Kotkin was interviewed by John Franklin on July 7, 1996. Kotkin first became associated with the Smithsonian in 1974 when she worked with the Family Folklore Project at the Festival of American Folklife; she returned to the Festival again in 1975 and 1976. In 1977 she was offered a position as a lecturer with the Smithsonian Associates program, which then developed into an administrative position with the Regional Events Program. Kotkin is now the Program Manager for the Smithsonian Associates Study Tours and Seminars.
This interview discusses Kotkin's educational background; how Kotkin became involved with the Family Folklore Project at the 1974 Festival of American Folklife; the work Kotkin did for the project; the growth in popularity of the exhibit; the continuation of the project over the next two Festivals; changes in the presentation of the exhibit; the course of her career at the Smithsonian since 1976; how the lecture series and workshops were received; answering conservation questions from her audiences; what it was like to change to an administrative position; traveling with the lecture series for ten years; her current job; her travel experiences, notably to South Africa; and her impressions of the 1996 Festival of American Folklife and the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit.

FAF/SM96-146 - Jen Page, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 20 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Jen Page was interviewed by Magdelena Mieri on July 7, 1996. Page was born in Keene, New Hampshire, in 1972 and moved to the Washington, DC, area in 1990. She came to work at the Smithsonian in the summer of 1992 as an intern under Olivia Cadaval in the Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (CFPCS). She returned in 1993 to volunteer at the Festival of American Folklife; she was a paid Festival aide in 1994 and worked with the Culture and Development Program. She was hired by the Smithsonian Associates and began working at the Smithsonian full time in July 1994. Page began as a customer service representative for the Study Tours and Seminars section; after 6 months, she was moved to the operations section of International Tours. Page is now the administrative assistant to the Director of the Smithsonian Associates, Mara Mayor.
This interview discusses what Page did as a customer service representative, the course of her career at the Smithsonian, her work as an intern with Olivia Cadaval, visits to the Smithsonian with her family, her first day of work, a typical day of work as a customer service representative, the location of the office, a typical day of work now, the videoconferencing project which Page is working on, the Smithsonian as compared to a government or private agency, challenging aspects of her job, changes at the Smithsonian, what working at the Smithsonian means to her, visiting the museums when she is not working, and memories of the Festival of American Folklife.

FAF/SM96-147 - Kethshara Khlok, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 33 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Kethshara Khlok was interviewed by Francine Berkowitz on July 7, 1996. Khlokmoved to the United States from Cambodia in 1974 and attended a clerical school to prepare fora career. She came to work at the Smithsonian in 1979 and started in the typing pool, where she was assigned to work in the Office of Public Affairs (OPA). Khlok is now a clerk-typist in the Office of Human Resources (OHR) and attends Northern Virginia Community College part time, where she is working on her Associates Degree in liberal arts.
This interview discusses the course of her career at the Smithsonian, her memories of working in OPA, the changes in OHR over the years, office picnics, recognition of her culture at the Smithsonian, a typical day of work, her hopes to move to a museum, how she came to work at the Smithsonian, visiting the museums when she is not working, the "Magnificent Voyagers" exhibit, the 1996 Festival of American Folklife and her attention to the narrative stage, the 150th birthday party, and how the Employee Assistant Program helped her cope with her divorce.

FAF/SM96-148 - Peter Magoon, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 20 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Peter Magoon was interviewed by John McKiernan Gonzalez on July 7, 1996. Magoon was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1954. He began working for the Smithsonian as a member of the grounds crew for the Festival of American Folklife in 1982. He became grounds crew chief, and in 1985 he was technical director for the Festival of India. From 1985-1987, Magoon worked as an archivist for the Folklife Archives, and then for the Central Information Resource Center. Magoon left the Smithsonian and now works for Network Solutions in Herndon, Virginia.
This interview discusses the course of Magoon's career at the Smithsonian, his educational background, why he left the Smithsonian, how he heard about the Festival of American Folklife, what he did as a member of the grounds crew, his responsibilities and work as technical director for the Festival of India, stories from the Festival of India, the Smithsonian compared to the private sector as an employer, visiting the Smithsonian, the diversity of the Festival, and the Smithsonian's museums compared to the Festival.

FAF/SM96-149 - Mitchell Jones, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 14 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Mitchell Jones was interviewed by John McKiernan Gonzalez on July 7, 1996. Jones was born in Washington, DC, in 1967 and interned at the Office of Exhibits Central (OEC) in the summer of 1993. He then worked on the "Science in American Life" and "Power of Maps" exhibits at the National Museum of American History. Jones is now a graphic designer and a member of the Resident Associates program.
This interview discusses visits to the Smithsonian since childhood, his memories of the Smithsonian, his internship with OEC, working on the Festival of American Folklife during his internship, stories of working at the Smithsonian, his negative internship experience, how internship programs at the Smithsonian could be improved, comparing his internship at the Smithsonian to his current job, the Festival of American Folklife, his reactions to the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit, visiting the Zoo, and his continuing interest in the Smithsonian and its resources.

FAF/SM96-150 - Geoffrey Parker, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 26 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Geoffrey Parker was interviewed by Francine Berkowitz on July 7, 1996. Originally from northern Virginia, Parker also lived in Europe while his parents were in the foreign service. Parker was working for the New York Botanical Garden when he was recruited by the Smithsonian. He came to work at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) in September 1987 as a forest ecologist.
This interview discusses how Parker came to work for the Smithsonian; visiting the Smithsonian as a child; the Smithsonian's reputation; how his interest in biology developed; what his job entails; his research interests, especially in the forest canopy; his project using cranes to research the canopy; teaching a safety course on climbing trees for scientific purposes; the insufficient cooperation between Smithsonian bureaus and museums; visiting the Smithsonian museums on the Mall; the Smithsonian's 150th anniversary; the public's expectations of the Smithsonian; the future of the Institution; and the educational outreach programs which are available at the SERC facilities.

FAF/SM96-151 - Nancy Sweezy, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 29 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Nancy Sweezy was interviewed by Francine Berkowitz on July 7, 1996. Born in New York in 1921, Sweezy worked with Ralph Rinzler both before and during his career at the Smithsonian. She was involved in the production of several Festivals. Sweezy taught art in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and is also a potter.
This interview discusses how she met Ralph Rinzler; her increasing interest in crafts and the growing folk movement; Rinzler's and Sweezy's work for the Newport Folk Festival; how the crafts exhibition was received at the festival; the establishment of Country Roads, Inc. in 1965 with Norman Kennedy; the growth and popularity of this business; how displays were created in the store; continuing to work with Rinzler at the Smithsonian; her work with the 1981 Southern crafts exhibit at the Festival; the Festival's concern with presenting the whole craft process to the public; her work with recent immigrant communities and their struggles to preserve their culture; and the different perceptions of folkarts and fine arts and how Sweezy would like to change this.

FAF/SM96-152 - Jeffrey LaRiche, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 45 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Jeffrey LaRiche was interviewed by Pam Henson on July 7, 1996. Born in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1947, LaRiche was a Peace Corps volunteer in Afghanistan. He came to Washington, DC, in 1975 and studied anthropology and folklore before coming to work for the Smithsonian. He began his career in 1975 as a coordinator for the Asian and Middle Eastern programs for the1976 Bicentennial Festival. He continued his work with the Festival of American Folklife on term appointments for many years, finally becoming the Deputy Director of the Folklife Program. LaRiche became the Deputy Assistant Secretary for External Affairs, and then in 1983 he was appointed as the Special Assistant to Ralph Rinzler, who was Assistant Secretary for Public Service. He left the Smithsonian in 1989.
This interview discusses how LaRiche came to Washington, DC, and the Smithsonian; his first impressions of working at the Smithsonian; what his duties were during his first appointment; his experiences with an Egyptian performance group; finding authentic folk groups to perform at the Festival; what happens to the groups when they return to their native countries; the Festival's involvement in their readjustment; the difficulties in bringing people from different cultures to the U.S.; logistics of the Festival; troublesome participants; what experiences prepared LaRiche to work at the Smithsonian; and working with Ralph Rinzler. The interview also covers how LaRiche continued to work at the Smithsonian; why he returned to work on the Festival; the different positions and types of work he did during his Smithsonian career; the work he did for the 1977, 1978, and 1980 Festivals; hiring Richard Kurin and his work with the Festival; how he and Rinzler worked together; stories of working at the Smithsonian; the transition from Folklife to an administrative position; and the Smithsonian's transition from Secretary Ripley to Secretary Adams.

FAF/SM96-153 - Edward Fisher III, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 13 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Edward Fisher III was interviewed by Magdelena Mieri on July 7, 1996. Fisher was born in Washington, DC, in 1952 and came to the Smithsonian in 1986. He is a laborer and has worked at the National Museum of Natural History, the Arts and Industries Building, and the Castle. Fisher now works at the Freer Gallery and has volunteered at the Festival of American Folklife for three years.
This interview discusses the duties of Fisher's job, who he works with, how he came to work at the Smithsonian, his childhood visits and impressions of the Smithsonian, his first day of work, what a difficult day of work would be, the variety of working at the Smithsonian, challenges of the job, changes at the Smithsonian, what working at the Smithsonian means to him, visiting specific exhibits when he is not working, and stories of working at the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-154 - Jeff Place, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 21 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Jeff Place was interviewed by Jen Page on July 7, 1996. Place was born in Palo Alto, California, in 1956 but grew up in Falls Church, Virginia. He received the M.L.S., specializing in archives, and worked at the Library of Congress Folklife Archives before coming to work at the Smithsonian in 1988. Place is an archivist and runs the Folklife Archives in the Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (CFPCS). Place has also attended the Festival of American Folklife since 1970, either as a visitor, volunteer, or staff member.
This interview discusses the type of work he does; who he works with, notably Stephanie Smith and Tony Seeger; how he came to work at the Smithsonian; his favorite part of the collection; his education; visiting the Smithsonian museums as a child; his first impressions of working at the Smithsonian; working for the Smithsonian in an off Mall facility; comparing the Folklife Archives with the Archives Center at the National Museum of American History; collaborating with other Smithsonian offices; his first day of work; a typical day of work; how his job has changed; his career and plans for the future; favorite projects he has worked on; goals for the Folklife Archives; the Smithsonian as compared to a government agency or private company; challenging aspects of his work; what working at the Smithsonian means to him; visiting the museums when he is not working; and changes at the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-155 - Norman Novack, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 45 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Norman Novack was interviewed by John McKiernan Gonzalez on July 7, 1996. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1952 and attended the Wharton Business School at the University of Pennsylvania, where he majored in public management. During his schooling, Novack did an internship at the Smithsonian in the summer of 1980; his internship turned into a full time position. He began as a financial analyst at the National Museum of American History, became a budget analyst at the Office of Planning Management and Budget (OPMB), and is now a management analyst in the same office.
This interview discusses the course of his career, why he chose the Smithsonian for his internship, visiting the Smithsonian for his internship, stories of working at the Smithsonian, his professional dealings with Congress, stories of Congressional hearings, how he would have presented his job at the Festival, the history of budget successes and failures, tracking appropriation bills, changes at the Smithsonian, the future of the Institution, stories he heard of the Smithsonian's past through the OSIA Oral History Project, the Smithsonian's reputation and how the public reacts to the Institution, visiting the museums when he is not working, and his participation in the Smithsonian Recreation Association in the past.

FAF/SM96-156 - David Squires, July 7, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 45 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
David Squires was interviewed by Jen Page on July 7, 1996. Born in Providence, Rhode Island, in 1939, Squires attended Boston University. He began working for the Smithsonian in July 1963 on the satellite tracking program of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO). When funding for the program was cancelled, Squires began to work for the Center for Short-Lived Phenomenon, also a part of the Smithsonian. The name later changed to the Scientific Event Alert Network, and Squires was the manager of this program. He worked there from 1969-1975, when he began working part time in the Shipping and Receiving Office and the Transportation Office in the National Museum of Natural History. He became a supervisor of these offices in November 1980 and worked there until his retirement in October 1991.
This interview discusses the course of Squires's career, the different places he worked while with the satellite tracking program, the history and purpose of the program, what work they did each night, his work and interesting projects while with the Scientific Event Alert Network, a typical day of work there, his interview and hiring by the Smithsonian, how he came to work in the Shipping and Receiving Offices, what he did there in his temporary and permanent capacities, stories of working at the Smithsonian, challenges of the job, the growth of the staff, his role as a supervisor, what working at the Smithsonian meant to him, who he worked with, collaborating with the Festival every year, dealing with Customs, and memories of the Festival of American Folklife.

FAF/SM96-157 - Doc Dougherty, June 28, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 2 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Doc Dougherty was interviewed by Paula Johnson on June 28, 1996. He was born in Charleston, West Virginia, in 1944 and worked with several photographers before coming to the Smithsonian in August 1973. He began as a printer at the National Museum of American History, where he worked for three years. He then moved to the National Museum of Natural History and remained for seven years. He then moved to the Museum Support Center (MSC). Dougherty was promoted during his career and is now Director of the Photography Branch of the Office of Printing and Photographic Services (OPPS). He also teaches leadership labs at local colleges d the magic course for the Campus on the Mall series.
This interview discusses how he got his nickname; how he came to work at the Smithsonian; his jobs prior to the Smithsonian; his childhood visits to the museums; comparing the Smithsonian to a carnival; his formal and informal educations; the course of his career; the first photographs he did for the Smithsonian; the positive experience of working at the MSC; why he enjoys his job; a typical day now; changes at the Smithsonian; photographing the Festival and other events on the Mall; memorable projects; changes in darkroom work; the possibility of retirement; the people he works with, including colleagues Lorie Aceto and Jim Wallace; and changes at the Smithsonian.

FAF/SM96-158 - Jahari Rashad, June 28, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 34 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Jahari Rashad was interviewed by Paula Johnson on June 28, 1996. Born in Washington, DC, Rashad has volunteered at the Festival of American Folklife for 16 years. In 1981 she worked with the children's program, and in 1982 she was the chief volunteer for the children's section. From 1983 until 1990 she was the participant hospitality chief volunteer, and since 1991 she has been in charge of the evening social events for the Festival participants. Her full time job is Training and Employee Development Specialist for the U.S. Department of the Interior.
This interview discusses the course of her volunteer work, what she does for her current volunteer position, the children's programs at the Festival, how she got involved with the Festival, including her daughter in her volunteer work, memorable Festival experiences, what she hopes people learn from coming to the Festival, keeping in touch with the friends she has made from the Festival, the chaotic process of putting the Festival together, what it takes to be a good volunteer, how the Festival affects the rest of her work year, returning to work after volunteering at the Festival, the work she has done this year, the tone of the 1996 Festival, and how the hotel staff handles the Festival participants.

FAF/SM96-159 - Elyse Lattner, July 4, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 10 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Elyse Lattner was interviewed by Emily Botein on July 4, 1996. She was born in Detroit, Michigan, in 1964 and lived in Connecticut for five years, then Baltimore, Maryland, for 5 years, and finally Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, for 8 years. She has lived in the Washington, DC, area since 1982. She is trained as a teacher for early childhood, but is currently a full time mother. Lattner and her family visit the Smithsonian several times a month.
This interview discusses how often she visits the Smithsonian and the Zoo, her memories of visiting as a child, what it is like to visit the museums with her children, her children's favorite Zoo animals, changes at the Smithsonian, what the Smithsonian means to her, her interest in history and popular culture, how the museums can foster parent and child interaction, visiting the Festival, suggestions for the improvement of the Smithsonian, field trips she and her class made to the Discovery Theater and the Zoo, suggestions for an increased Smithsonian presence in the classroom, and the 1996 Festival of American Folklife. Her sons Jacob and Noah, ages 4 and 2 respectively, are also present in this interview.

FAF/SM96-160 - Regina H. Ingrim, July 4, 1996.

Box 2 of 10
Total recording time: 9 minutes.
Original Master: 1 cassette tape.
Reference Copy: 1 digital audio .mp3 file.
Regina H. Ingrim was interviewed by Dorothy Blink on July 4, 1996. She was born in Georgia in 1946 and first visited the Smithsonian when she moved to Washington, DC. Ingrim had just completed her graduate work in social studies and history and began volunteering at the National Museum of American History and the Discovery Room of the National Museum of Natural History. She worked as a volunteer there from 1975-1976; she stopped volunteering because of her baby. Ingrim is now employed as a teacher.
This interview discusses her first visit to the Smithsonian on a date with her future husband; her docent training; what she did as a docent; why she started volunteering; the best part of volunteering; what she learned from her volunteer experiences, including sign language; stories from her volunteer work; bringing her children to the museum; her last day of working as a docent; maintaining her contacts with the museums; her favorite exhibit; memories of the Festival of American Folklife; her opinion of the "Working at the Smithsonian" exhibit; and frequent visits to the Zoo.

Box 3

Reel to reel remasters of original cassettes

Box 3 of 10

Box 4

Reel to reel remasters of original cassettes

Box 4 of 10

Box 5

Reel to reel remasters of original cassettes

Box 5 of 10

Box 6

Reel to reel remasters of original cassettes

Box 6 of 10

Box 7

Reel to reel remasters of original cassettes

Box 7 of 10

Box 8

Reel to reel remasters of original cassettes

Box 8 of 10

Box 9

Reel to reel remasters of original cassettes

Box 9 of 10

Box 10

Folders 1-13 Transcripts of the interviews of Francine Berkowitz, Myron Curtis, James Early, Douglas Evelyn, Jane Glaser, Peggy Langrall, Tom Lauderbaugh, Catherine Perge, Jeffrey LaRiche, NMAH "Skull Crew", Billy Turner, and Agnes Yore

Box 10 of 10

Folder 14 Digital remasters of audiotape recordings

Box 10 of 10