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ID: SIA RU007181

Creator: True, Frederick William, 1858-1914

Form/Genre: Fieldbook record

Date: 1886-1908

Citation: Frederick William True Papers, circa 1886-1910

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Abstract

Correspondence, notes, drawings, expense documents, news clippings, and ferry and rail time tables are arranged alphabetically by either correspondent or scientific name of specimen. There appears to be no specific rule which determines where a particular item is filed, and correspondence with individuals is often filed by scientific name. This collection division includes material on the collection and description of specimens, professional correspondence on fossil whales, and information on collecting localities. Some items of note include a geological cross section of Calvert formation at Chesapeake Beach, Maryland; 5-page list of Miocene fossil specimens from Virginia and Maryland, noting location, scientific name, and additional geographical information, and news clippings discussing the construction of a rail line through Washington DC/Maryland area. Specimen collecting locations include Virginia (along the Potomac and Nomini Cliffs), Maryland (Chesapeake Beach, Patuxent River), and Canada. There are numerous references to Cretacean and whale fossils.

Date Range

1886-1908

Start Date

Apr 25, 1886

End Date

Nov 10, 1908

Access Information

Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu.

Topic

  • Mammalogy
  • Miocene
  • Cetaceans
  • Paleontology

Place

  • Patuxent
  • Canada
  • United States
  • Potomac
  • Chesapeake Beach
  • Virginia
  • Maryland
  • Nomini Cliffs

Form/Genre

  • Fieldbook record
  • Field notes
  • Correspondence
  • Receipts (financial records)
  • Timetables

Accession #

SIA RU007181

Collection name

Frederick William True Papers, circa 1886-1910

Physical Description

1 field book

Physical Location

Smithsonian Institution Archives

Sublocation

Box 2 Folder 9

CAMBRIDGE NOV 10 11-AM 1908 MASS. POSTAL CARD THE SPACE BELOW IS FOR THE ADDRESS ONLY Dr. F.W. True U.S. National Museum Washington D.C.
Cambridge Mass 10 Nov. 1908 Dear Dr. True:- Please accept my thanks for your paper on 'The Classification of the Cetacea" which you kindly sent us. Sincerely yours Glover M. Allen
[[Boston postmark Feb 7, 1908]] [[Franked: Cambridge Station]] [[image - postage stamp with "United States of America" and "Postage One Cent" written on it]] [[image - Postmark from Washington D.C.]] POSTAL CARD THE SPACE BELOW IS FOR THE ADDRESS ONLY ^[[Dr. F. W. True, U.S. National Museum Washington D.C.]]
Cambridge, Feb. 6/08 Dear Dr. True:- Please accept my thanks for your very interesting paper on Schizodelphis and Priscodelphis that you kindly sent me. Sincerely yours, Glover M. Allen
ZELL am See geg. d. Kitzsteinhorn. [[image - black and white photograph looking across a lake towards mountains and a small town]]
Herzlichten Dank für Ihre Karte mit wärmsten Wünschen als Erwiderung von Ihrem aufrichtig ergebenen O. Abel F. W. [[underlined]] True [[/underlined]] Esq. [[underlined]] Washington D.C. [[/underlined]] Smithsonian Institution [[preprinted, vertically, next to note]] Verlag: Würthle & Sohn Nchf. G. m. b. H. Salzburg - Wien. [[/preprinted, vertically, next to note]] [[preprinted]] 201 [[/preprinted]] [[image - postmark [[U. Wien?]] 15 [[11?]] 10 6]] [[image - red and white postage stamp with words "Khiserlichekönigliche Osterreichischepost" and "10" "Heller" "10" on it]]
NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS FURNISHED BY THE American Press Information Bureau, WORLD BUILDING, PARK ROW, NEW YORK CITY, U.S.A. From the ________________________ [[faded rubber stamp]] SAN FRANCISCO, CAL [[/faded rubber stamp]] [[[faded stamp]] APR [[1899?]] [[/faded stamp]] [[written in between stamp dates]] ^[[9]] [[/written in between stamp dates]] Dated _________________________ [[separate newspaper scrap]] Fossil U [[Cartoon by: Methfessel]]
[[newspaper fragment]] Whale Found on a [[caption in illustration]] Rock formation where the fossils were found
Mountain Top Discovered Among Ocean Deposits 2500 Feet Above the Sea Level and Eighteen Miles Inland From the Coast Line. [[image - landscape]] [[image - whale tail in sea]]
Digging For Fossils. [[image - lower third of person in boots digging with spade]] [[image - whale like creature]] PROFESSOR LAWSON'S OPINION AS TO HOW THE WHALE'S HEAD CAME TO BE ON TOP OF THE COAST RANGE THE history of the Coast Range of California," said Professor Lawson of the State University, "Is that of a series of risings and submersions. Long ago, when the Sierra Nevada Mountains were firmly located where they are now, after having passed through the formation process of the Jurassic period, the coast of California was in a state of great disturbance. "The whole range of country was constantly being upheaved and then lowered again into the depths of the ocean. From all we can learn this happened about seven times. The last time this happened it remained beneath the water for centuries and centuries, long enough for the sandstone to be deposited. As the different marine creatures died, the whale among them, the solid parts, such as bone, settled into the sand and became imbedded there. Then ages and ages passed until several feet of solid stone were on top of the whale's bones. "When the last upheaval came the whole bottom of the ocean was lifted skyward and naturally the remains of all kinds of fish, etc., were taken along and left miles and miles inland from the water. That is the reason that we can go down into Monterey County and dig fish bones that are thousands of years old. "The common supposition that a tidal wave once swept over the country and left the creatures to die on the mountain tops is only a supposition that has not the least foundation in geological fact." [[article]] A fossil whale's head, the remains of oysters and other things of the sea have just been unearthed in Monterey County, at a place 2500 feet above the sea level and eighteen miles inland from the present coast line. Monterey County has furnished many strange bones of past life to the prying scientist, but nothing more curious than this has come out of her hills. Scientists agree that it is the most important find of its kind in recent years. The Jamesburg region, in which these fossil remains were discovered, contains an area about sixty miles square which has proved exceedingly rich in relics of ancient man and other animals. Specimens found in the Santa Lucia [[article cut off by tear in paper]] [[article continues]] finder of this valuable specimen, is a geologist by nature and spends nearly the whole of his time poking about among rocks and digging into the earth for curious specimens. Of book knowledge he knows almost nothing, and it is certainly a pity that he has found most of the fossils coming from the Jamesburg coun- [[article breaks]] STORIES OF THE GREAT [[cut off]] At the Time of His Death, Last Month, He Was Said to Explored the West With Buffalo Bill; Exposed the Carol- [[cut off]]
[[image - Waves, dinosaurs, and other illustrations]] [[caption]] Petrified whale's head found in Santa Lucia range 2,500 ft. above sea level. [[caption]] Stegosaurus Ungulatus Armor Plated Lizard
Mountains, six miles south of Salinas, remains of extinct animals and peculiar rock formations are also very valuable, being second only to those coming from the Jamesburg country. A noteworthy fact regarding these fossils is that the petrifactions of land animals are nearly all found at a much lower altitude than those of marine animals, the remains of a mastodon have come from the Santa Lucia Mountains some 300 feet above sea level, while a whale's head fossil, huge petrified oysters, fish fins, barnacles and other forms of sea life were found embedded in a ridge of sandstone at least 2500 feet above the sea and a distance of eighteen miles inland. Scientists would, doubtless, be able to explain this phenomenon as a natural consequence of the change of conditions in accordance with the transition from one geological period to another. The whale's head was found on the Finch ranch, near Jamesburg, and not far from Tassajara Springs. It is the almost perfect specimen of a portion of a whale's head from where it joins the vertebral column to about midway the length of the jaw, with the eye socket and part of the ball plainly discernable. The petrifaction is of the right side of the head, measures 30 inches in length, 18 inches in width and 12 inches in thickness, and weighs 350 pounds. It was discovered two weeks ago by a resident of the Jamesburg region, John Clenford, and was so tightly embedded in the sandstone formation of the ridge of the mountain that its contour was disfigured slightly in removing it. Had Clenford made use of the proper tools with which to disinter the relic it is probable that this misfortune might have been obviated. The pieces broken from it have all been preserved and can readily be fitted to their old places. The point of the ridge from which the fossil was taken is one of the highest of the surrounding mountains, and although the exact altitude was impossible of ascertainment, it is thought by comparison with surrounding points the altitude of which is known that it is not less than 3000 feet above the sea. Clenford, the [[clipped]] special to the Sunday Call. [[hard break]] Only two or three men in a century possess the regal gift of being a genius in many things. Professor O. C. Marsh of Yale University, who died recently, was endowed with such a gift to a remarkable degree. Besides being one of the most distinguished of American scientists, and perhaps the most famous paleontologist in the world, he won a wide renown outside of his scientific work as a daring and successful explorer, as a connoisseur in Japanese art, as a lover and collector of rare orchids, as a champion of the American Indians, and, supremely, as a story teller and writer of many scientific works. He spent a long life and a considerable fortune in building up a great public museum at Yale College. He never drew a penny of salary for his services as a professor, and about a year ago, when his health began to fail, he made over all his vast and priceless collections to the university and died a comparatively poor man. Two Small Bones Led to Fame. Fame and science are supposed to come with gray hairs. Professor Marsh was known everywhere in the scientific world at the age of 31. This sudden rise to fame was the result of a discovery which he made while he was yet a student at Phillips Academy, Andover. During one of his summer vacations he was tramping among the cliffs of Nova Scotia and he picked up by accident two odd bits of fossil bone. He found them lying close together, like two checkers, one partially overlapping the other. They were cylindrical in form, with sauserlike hollows at each end, and so insignificantly small that a man might close his hand around them. Young Marsh, already deeply interested in geology and mineralogy, dropped the bones into the pocket of his shooting jacket and carried them with him. He passed from Andover to Yale, where he was graduated with honors in 1860, and then he entered the Sheffield Scientific School. All this time he treasured the two fossil bones and their significance as a geological discovery became plainer to him with every added year of study. From the shape, size and relative position in which they were discovered, he knew them to be the vertebra of some enormous animal of prehistoric origin; but he had found them in a coal formation and the authorities gave no hint of creatures so highly developed in a geological age so remote. He believed that the two vertebrae indicated a hitherto unknown link between the fishes and the reptiles. He showed the bones to the famous geologist, Dana, and to Professor Jeffries Wyman of Harvard. They told him to see Agassiz, who knew more about fishes, living and extinct, than any other man. Agassiz examined the bones with keen interest, and inquired where they were found. When young Marsh told him the story of their discovery and ventured to outline his theories, the great scientist shook his head emphatically. "Impossible," he said. Studied Two Bones for Months. But young Marsh was certain that he had made an important discovery. At the suggestion of Professor Wyman he devoted six months to the study of the two little bones and their relationship to the remains of other extinct monsters; then he described them accurately in a published account, naming the animal from which they came the Eosaurus, the "dawn of lizards," the first reptilian remains to be found in the coal measures of America. The discovery of the Eosaurus came as strong affirmative evidence, showing conclusively the relationship between two widely different classes of animal life. At the instance of Sir Charles Lyell, the eminent English geologist, young Marsh's paper was read before the august Geological Society of London and its author was voted a fellow. It was translated into German and the young scientist was asked to accept the honor of a membership in the Geological Society of Berlin. In America Yale College was prompt with its appreciation of the value of the discovery, and although young Marsh was then just graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School, he was offered a seat in the university faculty as professor of paleontology. Discovered a Bird With Teeth. With such unusual recognition as this, Professor Marsh began a scientific career in which he was destined to accomplish more than any other one man perhaps in establishing the theory of evolution by actual discoveries. Darwin had built a magnificent hypothesis: Huxley had been its great expounder, and now came Marsh and other brilliant younger scientists, to whom a whole universe had been suddenly laid bare by a great idea, and by adding link after link to the chain of extinct life, helped to make the theory of development a scientific truth, capable of actual objective demonstration. As a single instance, opponents of evolution had cited the wide break between the two classes of birds and reptiles, declaring that doctrine could not bridge it over. In their definition of birds the zoologists of the time made toothlessness a cardinal characteristic; no birds familiar to science possessed any teeth. But Professor Marsh, exploring our own Rocky Mountain region, found the remains of a strange swimming bird with two well developed rows of teeth. A little later he discovered other reptilelike birds and birdlike reptiles, showing some of the actual steps by which the saurian of a million years ago became in the slow progress of the ages the feathered and toothless bird of to-day. "My first great ambition," Professor Marsh once told me, "was to shoot as well as old Colonel Jewett," a famous hunter of Western New York, and a great friend of his. "I was not satisfied until I could bring down a squirrel from the top crotch of a big hickory, where I could see only a tip of a red nose and one eye." His roving outdoor life made him a keen observer, and gave him the rugged vitality to withstand any degree of hardship. "If I had known what my future career was to be," he said, "I could not have mapped out my boyhood better."
[[captions partially cut off]] SCELIDOSAURUS [[/partially cut off]] OR BIG LIMBED LIZARD 20 FEET LONG [[captions partially cut off]] GREAT GROUND SLOTH [[/partially cut off]] OR MEGATHERIUM AMERICANUM. LENGTH 18 FEET. ANCIENT ANIMALS, FAR LARGER THAN THE ELEPHANT, RECONSTRUCTED BY THE LATE PROFESSOR MARSH. try he did not have sufficient knowledge of their position, surrounding formations and other conditions to be able to determine their approximate and scientific value. That Monterey County has long been known by scientists to be wonderfully rich geologically is attested by the following extract from a letter written in 1877 by Professor H. D. Long of the State University: "I have never seen a section of country so rich in fossil remains as Monterey County, nor one so easy to study. The part lying in the neighborhood of the Corral de Tierra contains strata whose relative position is so plain to even the slightly practical eye that 'he who runs may read' its geological history. "I note in that vicinity five fossil-bearing strata: the lowermost being of an average thickness of five feet and containing remains of at least four mollusks, cypoena and unio being represented. Above this I found, in very soft sandstone, many univalve shells of the type of barnacles, contained in a stratum about one yard in thickness. Superimposed upon the latter is a stratum, of thickness varying from seven feet to sixty feet, almost entirely made up of casts of unios and pecteus in 'dog-tooth spar' (crystallized carbonate of lime). This stratum I consider as the most remarkable of all, both on account of its immense thickness and the enormous number of shell-casts that are contained in it—not less, I should say, than 10,000 per cubic foot. Above the last described stratum there exists a layer of reddish sandstone one and one-half feet in thickness, containing remains of two of the before-mentioned bivalves. "Last of all and latest in its formation is the familiar white, soft material called 'chalk-rock' by the farmers, but which, in reality, is no more chalk than a brick is chalk. It is simply hardened clay, as may be felt by applying the tongue, substances composed of or containing clay always sticking to that member. The rock is white, with a conchoidal fracture, and is of light specific gravity. In some localities the color shades somewhat, but still the rock possesses nearly the same characteristics. In the tertiary epoch, when this clay rock was soft clay growing in thickness by deposition from the overlying sea or lake, many shells of turritella and fewer of a small mollusk, with a few scattered specimens of a univalve almost microscopic in size, became imbedded therein. Afterward, both before and since the hardening of this clay, the surrounding country has been subject to many upheavals and disturbances which have resulted in the extensive fracture and variable dip of the stratum, the latter varying from 12 to 40 degrees. All these strata belong to the tertiary. "This is merely an outline of the discoveries I have made in this hitherto neglected field. Of the fifteen or more species of fossils, I have identified nine—all belonging to the department of mollusks." Recent discoveries have shown the field to be both larger and richer than formerly known, the already discovered fossils ranging from microscopic remains of diatoms, sponges and other organic structures to those of mammoth prehistoric animals. Professor Marsh's letter was published in a Buffalo newspaper. The account of how the stone man was made had the effect of stimulating the manufacture of giants, and to the astonishment of every one half a dozen Cardiff giants were being exhibited around the country within a year. Recently the practical joker who made the giant told the story of his deception for the first time. Killed a Prehistoric Giant. Years later marvelous accounts came from Nevada of the discovery of human footprints in the sandstone strata at Carson City. Each of the prints was from eighteen to twenty inches long, about eight inches wide, having the exact shape of a moccasined human foot. There were regular right and left tracks, with a distance between them of from eighteen to nineteen inches. They were at once proclaimed as the remaining evidences of a race of giants which once inhabited the Pacific Coast, and the undoubted authenticity of the impressions on the stone induced not a few men of scientific pretensions to take this view. Such a discovery at once aroused the keen interest of Professor Marsh, but after an examination of the prints he came to the conclusion that they were not made by men at all. He read a paper on the subject to the National Academy of Sciences with which he presented a carefully drawn picture of the huge skeleton foot of an extinct sloth found in the same general region and in the same geological horizon. A comparison of this with the outline of the footprint showed conclusively that it was a sloth and not a man that [[cut off by torn edge of paper]] [[rectangular box composed of diamonds below article]] AMERICAN SCIENTIST, PROF. MARSH the Most Distinguished Geologist in the World: Won Fame When 31 Years Old, [[word missing]] Giant: Explained the Carson Footprints, and Reconstructed Ancient Monsters. [[/rectangular box]]
[[cut off by top edge of clipping]] told in reply that the reports to the effect were too unsatisfactory to be presented as facts in science. This remark led me on my return to examine the subject myself, and I have since unearthed no fewer than thirty distinct species of the horse tribe; and it is now, I think, generally admitted that America is, after all, the original home of the horse." Exposed the Cardiff Giant. It was Professor Marsh who exposed the famous Cardiff giant. In October, 1869, a farmer named Newell, living near Cardiff, N. Y., twelve miles south of Syracuse, was digging a well when he unexpectedly unearthed a stone giant ten feet long with a body, head and limbs in perfect proportion. It was at once proclaimed as the remains of a prehistoric man, and numbers of scientists made pilgrimages of examination and recorded their belief in its very great value as a scientific discovery. Even the State geologist of New York became greatly interested in the giant and endeavored to have it sent to the state Museum at Albany. But it was finally placed on exhibition at Syracuse, where it soon became an attraction almost equal to a circus. Special trains were run from the surrounding country to accommodate the people who wished to see it, and its owners are said to have refused an offer of $300,000 in cash for it, although they subsequently parted with a quarter share. So important did the relic become in the eyes of the scientific world that Professor Marsh visited Syracuse and made an examination of the giant. The next day he wrote to a friend: "It is of very recent origin, and a most decided humbug." He found that the figure had been cut from a block of gypsum, similar to that found in many parts of New York, and a close inspection revealed the presence of human workmanship. "As gypsum is soluble in about 400 parts of water," he wrote, "a very short exposure would suffice to obliterate all traces of tool marks and also to roughen the surfaces." [[cut off by top edge of clipping]] prehistoric lake and left his footprints on the sands of time. Professor Marsh was also fond of telling of an encyclopedia article which was commended to his attention. The writer, wishing to give modern man a graphic idea of the appearance of his remote ancestors, had made a restoration of an extinct animal in flesh and blood, but unfortunately he had placed the head on the end of the tail. Marsh, the Man. Personally, Professor Marsh wore few of the conventional airs of the scientist. He was a rugged-shouldered, firmly built man, a little under medium height, with white hair and a full white beard, a high forehead rising above a pair of engaging blue eyes. You met him with a golfing cap pulled down comfortably over his head, a long, black coat hanging loosely from his shoulders, and a bit of color in his neckcloth. He moved with a certain nervous energy that bespoke his active mind, and upon the first provocation he told you a story—and a very good one, too. Professor Marsh never married. "I have been too busy with my work," he said. In such honors as fall to men who have won distinction in science Professor Marsh had an unusual share. For seventeen years he was president of the National Academy of Sciences, perhaps the foremost scientific society in America, and president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 1877 he received the first of the Bigsby medals from the Geological Society of London, and last year the Institute of France, by presenting him with the Cuvier prize, conferred upon him the greatest honor that can fall to a scientist. The Cuvier prize is awarded every three years "for the most remarkable work either on the animal kingdom or on geology." Only two other Americans have received this distinction—Agassiz and Leidy, the paleontologist. RAY STANNARD BAKER
Cambridge, Mass. Jan 28/1908 Dear Dr. True:- Thank you very much for your paper on [[underlined]] Agorophins [[/underlined]] that came a few days ago, and for your promise to send me your papers, now in press, on fossil Cetacea. I shall be very glad indeed for these. Yours sincerely Glover M. Allen
[[blue ink stamp with initials and date within rectangles]] H.M. JAN 18 1908 Ans'd Jan. 21 orderd 1694 16 Oxford St. Cambridge, Mass. Jan. 13, 1908. Dear Dr. True:- Please accept my thanks for your note on the Mesoplodons of the Atlantic Coast of the United States. I shall await with interest the publication of your more detailed paper. I find that I haven't a copy of your recent paper from the Smithsonian Contributions on the Type of [[underscored]] Agorophins pygmaens [[underscored]], and I should greatly appreciate the favor if you have an extra copy to spare me. Yours sincerely Glover M. Allen
Agorophins [[preprinted]] University of Pennsylvania. THE COLLEGE. GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY PHILADELPHIA, [[/preprinted]] 19 May 1906. Ansd May 23/06 Dear Dr. True: I have received word from Dr. J. Percy Moore of the Biological Dept. that they have no record of a Specimen of [[underlined]] Agorophins pygmaeus [[/underlined]]. He says "The fossil in question is not now, and, so far as I know, never was in this building. It is a very characteristic specimen and if intact would be readily recognized? I think you may say that the specimen is not at this university. Faithfully your Amos P. Brown To Dr F.W. True Washington.
J. A. A. AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 77TH STREET AND CENTRAL PARK WEST NEW YORK February 24, 1910. DEPARTMENT OF MAMMALOGY AND ORNITHOLOGY Dear Dr. True:- Your letter of February 21, in reference to the proof of your paper was duly received. I have delayed responding until I received proof of the plates which was delivered only an hour ago. I am returning the original photograph and two sets of the proof. I beg you will make up the plates as you wish them to appear, and furnish the necessary legends, and also any references to them in the text that may be required. Trusting to receive the proofs back at your early convenience, Very truly yours, J A. Allen Dr. F. A. True, U. S. National Museum, Washington, D. C.
Dear Dr Allen :- I am returning herewith the proof and illustrations of my article on [[underlined]] Diodrotichus [[underlined]] — Two of the figures of the earbone could be improved by slight corrections. These are indicated on a separate proof, which is enclosed with the original photographs. The corrections are slight, however, and I shall not be dissatisfied if they are disregarded — I hope you will allow the [[strikethrough]] orignial [[/strikethrough]] original position of words in sentences to stand, as indicated on the proofs. A considerable number of transpositions were made [[insertion]] ^ in the manuscript [[/insertion]] editorially. [[strikethrough]] and [[/strikethrough]] I am willing to concede some of these,
but others, in my opinion, alter the sense slightly, and I should much prefer to have my own order [[strikethrough]] fo [[/strikethrough]] retained.
[[preprinted]] Postkarte [[/preprinted]] [[two green 5 Deutsches Reich stamps, stamped with Langebrosh Sachsen a 11.10.10.7-8N]] Herrn F.W. True, M.L., LL.D. Washington. D.C. (U.S.A) U.S. Nat. Mus 1320 Fairmont Str. [[stamp]] Dr. Th. Arldt Langebrück Bergerstr. 15 [[/stamp]]
Langebruck b. Dresden I.11. ORt. 1910 [[pencil]] Sent Oct 27 [[/pencil]] Hochgeehrter Herr Dr! Sie würden mit zu großem Danke verpflichten, wenn Sie mir ein Separatum Ihres Aufsatzes: [[underline]] A new genus of fossil Cetacean, from Santa Cruz Territory Patagonia etc. [[/underline]] aus Smithsonian Moscell. Coll. 5.4.1910, S. 441-456 überlassen [[?Kennten, illegible]], da ich über diese Arbeit gern möglichst bald in der Naturwissenschaftlichen Rundschau Bericht erstatten möchte. Mit verbindlichstens Danke im voraus in größter Hochachtung Dr. Th. Arldt
[[underlined]] Anoplouassus [[/underlined]] [[circled]] 1 [[/circled]] √ Cope - 69 - E.p. 189 pl. 5 fig. 5. PAPS - 11. 171 - 192 pls. 3-5 [[circled]] 2 [[/circled]] 69 - 0 - Can. Nat. 14, 320 - 1 [[circled]] 6 [[/circled]] √ 90 - F. p 700 fig. 2 - Amer. Nat. 24, bls - [[circled]] 8 [[/circled]] 95 - A. p. 138 PAPS . 34, pl. 6. [[circled]] 9 [[/circled]] √ [[Frones.?]] - 1898 A. pp. 1003, 1057 Cat. Mam. [[circled]] 7 [[/circled]] √ Ziltel. - 1893. B, p. 179 Haub. Pal. 4. Vertebrata [[circled]] 4 [[/circled]] Brandt. - 1873. A. p 289 Mim. St Peter, (7) 20 - [[circled]] 3 [[/circled]] √ Leidy √ [[underline]] n.g. [[/underline]] 18[[overwritten]] 9 [[/overwritten]]69. A., p. [[overwritten]] 83 [[/overwritten]] 436 - Ext. Mam, [[Faua?]] D & N [[circled]] 5 [[/circled]] √ [[strikethrough]] [[Frones?]] - Van Ber & G. - A. p. 386 text - fig Ostery -
Alveoli - "That line teeth occupied these positn, appears to me doubtful, from their shallowness, and small [[feramina?]] - I rather suppose them to have been knots or bosses, possibly [[conieous?]] in structure - " (p.189 - Cope) [[circled]] 1 [[/circled]] - Thought its affects were with the "aberrant Cetacea" - "The nearest types appear to be on the one hand Sirenia, as with the other, [[underline]] Squalodon [[/underline]] - (do) [[Ditto for: (p.189 - Cope)]] Found with Mastodon "not far from Savannah, Georgia" - xxv "It is [[presently?]] in the Mus of Compara Zooly. Cambridge, Mass., and was lent me for examination by Prof Agassiz, the director." (p. 190 - do [[Ditto for: Cope)]] [[circled]] 1 [[/circled]] ) [[circled]] 1 [[/circled]] - pl. 5 figs. 5 & 5a (1/2) lithograph. Very good - [[line]] [[circled]] 6 [[/circled]] Puts it with Sirenia in Halitherindae, but says "This by no means certain that it belongs here, and it maybe a Cetacean (p. 700) Fig 4 (1/4) - Poor. Says it is from S. C., - in the "phosphatic deposits"
Tuomey (Acm of Sci. (2), 4, 1847, pp. 283 - 5. Describes it and gives his figs. [[insertion]] ^ Postn of left upper maxilla contng 1 tooth [[/insertion]] Given to Tuomey by F. S. Holmes [[strikethrough]] , [[/strikethrough]] Lewis R. Gibbes afterward collected [[more?]] of the skull [[insertion]] ^ Eocene [[/insertion]] [[strikethrough]] Dimensions, length 14 1/2 [[/strikethrough]] beds of Ashley R. about 10 miles from Charleston Dimensions. - Length 14 1/2 in.; gilst breadth 7 1/2 in, height 5 1/2 in. length of enameled portion of tooth, 7/8 in; breadth, 5/8 in - "It is evidently young" - Figures top & right side - Maxillae appear perfect proximally - Figure crude but appantly fairly accurate. Tooth shape similar to later figures. Reprinted with prepatory remarks in, P.AUSP., 3. 1847. pp. 151 - 153, with copies of the original figures - Reprinted in J.A.N.S.P. (2) vol. 1, pp. 16 - 17 In the same Journal. p. 8, Dr. R. W. Gibbes, states that he examined the specimen, and does not think it is a young animal. He thinks it may be identical specifically with Grateloup's
2 [[underlined]] Squalodon [[/underlined]] - the original figures with [[strikethrough]] & [[/strikethrough]] slight modifications are reproduced on pl. 5 In 1867 (PAUSP. 1867. 155) Cope assigned the species to [[underlined]] Doryodon [[/underlined]] as [[underlined]] Doryodon pygmaeus [[/underlined]] - In 1895 he remarked"
[[preprinted]] Smithsonian Institution. UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM. [[line]] [[/preprinted]] Rept Geol. Surv S.C. 166 1848, 1849 _ 69
[[insertion]] [[underlined]] Anoplouassa [[/underlined]] [[/insertion]] May 31. 1906 Prof C. R. Eastman Museum of Comparative Zoology Cambridge Mass. Dear Prof. Eastman:- Your letter of [[strikethrough]] May [[/strikethrough]] the 27th inst. relative to [[underlined]] Anoplouassa [[/underlined]] reached me this morning. Mr. Gidley handed me the [[strikethrough]] sp [[/strikethrough]] type - specimen some days ago but [[strikethrough]] I he [[/strikethrough]] did not make any remark at the time as to [[strikethrough]] what [[/strikethrough]] why (or [[insertion]] ^ on [[/insertion]] what conditions) it was placed in my hands, except that he thought it would interest me. I need not say that I was delighted to see it, though I was familiar with it from Cope's figures. As soon as I looked at it, I felt very well satisfied as to [[strikethrough]] what [[/strikethrough]] its relationships [[strikethrough]] were [[/strikethrough]], & have [[insertion]] ^ not since [[/insertion]] modified my opinion materially
2 Having a little leisure, I proceeded to work out the history of the specimen, and have [[strikethrough]] developed [[/strikethrough]] [[underlined]] my views regarding it [[/ underlined]] [[insertion]] ^ put [[strikethrough]] together [[/strikethrough]] [[/insertion]] on paper what there is to say on that subject, together with a statement of my views as to the affinities of the species. It was my idea to print a brief article on it in some suitable place, and should be glad to [[strikethrough]] do so [[/strikethrough]] put it in the [[underlined]] Bull. Mus. Comp. Zool. [[/underlined]], if desired, though I should much prefer to have the matter stand by itself, rather to be incorporated in the article you are preparing. [[insertion]] ^ This is for the reason that [[/insertion]] I [[strikethrough]] have [[/strikethrough]] am [[strikethrough]] never believed in [[/strikethrough]] [[insertion]] ^ not [[strikethrough]] strongly [[/strikethrough]] in favor of [[strikethrough]] much [[/strikethrough]] [[/insertion]] joint authorship where [[strikethrough]] questions [[/strikethrough]] matters of opinion are involved. Still, I am willing to do what is reasonable. Of course, I should do nothing as the matter now stands without your knowledge & consent. [[strikethrough]] A [[/strikethrough]] It is is a great pleasure to know that the type of [[underlined]] Loplio- [[underlined]]
3 [[underlined]] cetus [[/underlined]] is extant and in good hands. I hope you will publish some good [[insertion]] ^ photographic [[/insertion]] figures of it [[insertion]] ^ using [[strikethrough]] some preparation [[/strikethrough]] a wash that will make it light enough in color to bring out the form of the many regions [[/insertion]]. Harlan's & Cases's figures are practically worthless. I judge that the specimen is badly in need of the services of a skilful preparator. The atlas ought to be separated from the occiput and cleaned up, as well as all the back part of the skull. It is possible that the type of [[underlined]] Agorophius [[/underlined]] (= Zeuglodon [[underlined]] pygmaeus [[/underlined]] Mueller) has strayed away to Cambridge? I have been trying to locate it for some time but without success. It is not in New York, Philadelphia or Charleston. The Smithsonian has an unpublished plate of this species about 50 years old which I am just now preparing for publication. I have been engaged for about a year in collecting specimens of fossil cetaceans [[insertion]] ^ for the Museum [[/insertion]] and have got together [[strikethrough]] about a thousand pieces [[/strikethrough]] some 1200 pieces so far - I am planning a full revision of the American species and next winter shall
4 visit all the museums where types and other specimens are to be found. Of course, I have seen many already, especially Cope's & Leidy's types in Philadelphia. [[strikethrough]] I [[/strikethrough]] Would you be willing to have a cast [[strikethrough]] made [[/strikethrough]] of [[underlined]] Anoplouassa [[/underlined]] made here? I should like very much to arrange for it, if you are willing. Hope to hear from you [[insertion]] ^ further [[/insertion]] at your convenience. I am Yours very sincerely P.S. Can you give me a page reference to Abel's [[underlined]] Mioziphius belgicus [[/underlined]]? It must be in a recent paper not yet arrived here. Our library seems particularly slow in receiving some publications.
[[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION UNITED STATE NATIONAL MUSEUM [[line]] MEMORANDUM [[/preprinted]] [[stamped]] A.A. NOV 13 1906 [[/stamped]] Nov. 12. 1906 To Dr. R. Rathbun Assistant Secretary in charge National Museum I desire ask your stamp of approval on this statement of a transaction in which I became involved some months ago, and regarding which you have already expressed approval in a general way orally. Last Spring, Mr. Gridley on returning from a visit to New York, handed me a specimen which he had received from Prof. C. R. Eastman, and asked if I knew what it was. I recognized it at once as the type of the fossil cetacean, [[underlined]] Anoplouassa [[/underlined]]. Mr. Gridley left the specimen with me, and as I had a little time, I made a study of it and prepared a brief manuscript, with the intent of publishing the latter in some journal. Before I finished it, I received a letter from Prof. Eastman, asking whether I had received the fossil and inquiring whether I would express an opinion regarding it, to be incorporated in a paper he was preparing. I wrote him
2 that I did not understand at first that the specimen had been sent me for any particular purpose, but merely from my known interest in the cetacea, and that if my opinion about it was to be published I preferred to have it appear in a separate article. He agreed to this and said the article might appear as a bulletin of the Mus. of Comp. Zoology. When writing, I inquired whether he would object to a cast being made for preservation in the National Museum, to which he replied that the Museum of Comp. Zoology had no objection, but would like to have a cast also, if possible. On receiving this word, I had three casts made by Mr. Palmer, with the idea that one might be sent to the Mus. of Comp. Zoology, in return for its courtesy in allowing us to make a mold. In preparing the paper on the specimen, I found it desirable to have two photographs made of the jaw of a beaked whale in the National Museum collection, for comparison. I have already submitted a requisition for this work, which I suppose might also be considered a return for courtesies received. Finally, as the paper is based in some part on the collections of the
3 [[preprinted]] Smithsonian Institution UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM [[line]] MEMORANDUM [[/preprinted]] National Museum, I desire to ask permission to publish it in the Bulletin of the Museum of Comp. Zoology - I think the foregoing covers all there is to be said regarding this important specimen from an official point-of-view. Though I was exceedingly glad to examine it, it was sent to me without any solicitation on my part. Yours respectfully F.W. True Head Curator: Biology [[stamped]] APPROVED: ASSISTANT SECRETARY. [[/stamped]] [[signature]] R. Rathbun [[/signature]]
[[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM WASHINGTON D.C. [[/preprinted]] June 12. 1906 Dear Prof. Eastman: Your letter of June 2 [[superscript]] [[underlined]] d [[/underlined]] [[/superscript]], , relative to [[underlined]] Anoplouassa [[/underlined]], and the photographs arrived in due course. I beg to thank you for your kind permission to cast the type of [[underlined]] Anoplouassa [[/underlined]]. The mold has been made already & I have no doubt the cast will be successful. I am considerably puzzled as to what to say regarding an article. I have only 8 or 10 pages written and should not want to finish the article without having seen Abel's paper. Furthermore, I am planning to do some field-work right away and after that must take a vacation, so that it would probably be September before I should be ready to finish up [[underlined]] Anoplouassa [[/underlined]] . It seems to me therefore that it might be best if you would go ahead with whatever you intend to publish, & if there is anything left for me to say, [[strikethrough]] to [[/strikethrough]] [[insertion]] I could [[/insertion]] say it next Fall. Of course, I should be very glad to to put it in the [[underlined]] Bull. Comp. Zool. [[/underlined]], if that seems best. I was [[strikethrough]] extremely interested [[/strikethrough]] in
the photo. of [[underlined]] Lophocetus [[/underlined]] & wished [[strikethrough]] extremely [[/strikethrough]] very much that you had sent a view of the upper surface. I must confess that I am greatly puzzled about its relationships. It doesn't look to me much like [[underlined]] [[Juia?]] [[/underlined]] - As I may be coming up toward Boston the latter part of this month, [[strikethrough]] I [[/strikethrough]] it is possible I shall take the opportunity to run over & take a look at the specimen. The ear-bones are [[strikethrough]] interestin, & I ... [[/strikethrough]] a puzzling lot shall be interested to read what you say about them. I have quite a number & consider them hard nuts to crack. Next winter, however, I propose to sit down to a real study of them. I did not [[strikethrough]] quite [[/strikethrough]] understand whether you meant me to keep the photographs or return them. Anyway I am holding them till I hear from you again. Yours very sincerely
To Dr R Rathburn Nov. 12. 1906 Assistant Sectary National Muesum [[insertion]] I desire to ask your [[strikethrough]] written [[/strikethrough]] stamp of approval [[insertion]] ^ [[strikethrough]] on this explanatory of ^ [[/strikethrough]] [[/insertion]] [[insertion]] [[strikethrough]] regarding [[/strikethrough[]] on this statement I [[/insertion]] a transaction which I became involved in some months ago, and [[strikethrough]] regard [[/strikethrough]] regarding which [[strikethrough]] I have your general verbal oral approval [[/strikethrough]] you have [[strikethrough]] have [[/strikethrough]] already [[insertion from below]] expressed [[/insertion]] approval in a general way orally. Last Spring Mr. Gidley, on returning from a visit to New York handed me a specimen which he had received from Prof. C.R. Eastman, and asked me if I knew what it was. I recognized it at once as the type of a fossil Cetacèan, [[underline]] Anoplouassa. [[/underline]] Mr. Gidley left it with me, and having a little time, I made a study of it and prepared a brief manuscript, with the intention of publishing the latter in some journal. Before I had finished it, I received a letter from Prof. Eastman, asking if I had received the fossil, and inquiring whether I would [[strikethrough]] give [[/strikethrough]] express [[strikethrough]] my [[/strikethrough]] an opinion regarding its [[aff?]], to be incorporated in a paper he was preparing. I wrote him that I did not understand at first [[strikethrough]] that I [[/strikethrough]] that the specimen had been sent me for any particular purpose but merely for my known interest in [[strikethrough]] such [[/strikethrough]] the Cetacea [[strikethrough]] , He [[/strikethrough]] and that if my [[strikethrough]] accept [[/strikethrough]] opinion about it was to be published [[strikethrough]] about it, [[/strikethrough]] I preferred to [[strikethrough]] may the specimen the subject [[/strikethrough]] have it appear in
2 [[strikethrough]] of [[/strikethrough]] a separate article. He agreed to this and said [[strikethrough]] it [[/strikethrough]] [[insertion]] ^ the article [[/insertion]] might be published as a bulletin of the Museum of Comp. Zoology. [[strikethrough]] At the [[/strikethrough]] At the same time I enquired whether he would object to a cast being made of or presentation in the National Museum to which he replied that the Museum of Comp. Zoology [[strikethrough]] would be glad [[/strikethrough]] had no objection, but would like to have a cast also, if possible. On receiving this word, I had three casts made by Mr. Palmer, with the idea that one might be sent to the Mus. of Comp. Zoology in return for its courtesy [[strikethrough]] in letting us have for [[/strikethrough]] [[insertion]] ^ in [[/insertion]] allowing us to make a mold. In preparing the paper on the specimen, I found it desirable to have two photographs made of a beaked whale [[insertion]] ^ jaw [[/insertion]] in the National Museum collection, for comparison. I have already submitted a requisin for this work, which I suppose might also be considered a return for courtesies received. Finally, as the paper is based in [[strikethrough]] small [[/strikethrough]] part on the Natural Museum Collection, I desire to ask permission to
[[upper right corner]]3[[/upper right corner]] publish it in the Bulletin of the Museum of Comp. Zoology. I think the foregoing covers all there it to be said regarding [[strikethrough]] the receipt of[[/strikethrough]] this important specimen from a official point-of-view. Though I was exceedingly glad to examine it, it [[strikethrough]] came [[/strikethrough]] was sent to me without an solicitat on my part. Yours respectfully [[?]]
[[Table with 24 columns]] [[Column headings]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales Balaena palaeatlantica (Rheynopsis) B. psisca (Siphoncetus) Balaenop. pusilla (Cetotherium) Eschr. cephalus (Do. [[Ditto for: Cetotherium]]) Eschr. leptocentrus (Do. [[Ditto for: Cetotherium]]) Meg. expansa (Siphono.) Mesoteras Kerrianus Bal. physalus Gravesend B. acuto rostrata Norway Plesiocetus brailmontii P. subeus P. bustoni Meg. nodosa Amphicetus verus A. editus A. rotundus Hetero cetus affinis H. brevifrons H. sprangii Mesocetus longirostus M. pingius Idiocetus laxatus I. longifrons [[/column headings]] [[line headings]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales Total length, est. Length of skull 1st Thoracic vertebra Length of centrum Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] 1st Lumbar vertebra Length of centrum Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] 1st Caudal vertebra Length of centrum Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] [[/line headings]] [[columns 1 & 2]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | Balaena palaeatlantica (Rheynopsis) Total length, est. | Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | in. 1√ Length of centrum | { 6.75 1√ Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | { 6.0 2√ Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | { 5.5 3√ 1st Lumbar vertebra | - - Length of centrum | - - Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum | - - Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - [[/columns 1 & 2]] [[columns 1 & 3]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | B. psisca (Siphoncetus) Total length, est. | Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | in. Length of centrum | - - Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - 1st Lumbar vertebra | - Length of centrum | Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - 1st Caudal vertebra | 1√ Length of Autrum | 6.5 Breadth " [[Ditto for: of Autrum]] | 6.5 4√ Depth " [[Ditto for: of Autrum]] | 6.0 4√ [[/columns 1 & 3]] [[columns 1 & 4]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | Balaenop. pusilla (Cetoshenum) Total length, est. | 18 ft Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | Length of centrum | 4.9 1√ Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.25 1√ Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 3.5 1√ 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum | 4.9 1√ Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.2 1√ Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 3.9 1√ 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum | - - Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - | Cope [[/columns 1 & 4]] [[columns 1 & 5]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | Eschr. cephalus (Do. [[Ditto for: Cetotherium]]) Total length, est. | 31 ft Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | in Length of centrum | 2.8 16√ Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 3.5 16√ 1st Lumbar vertebra | - - Length of centrum | 3.5 17√ Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.3 17√ 1st Caudal vertebra | 1√ Length of Autrum | 5.2 Breadth " [[Ditto for: of Autrum]] | 5.75 4√ Depth " [[Ditto for: of Autrum]] | 4.9 4√ [[/columns 1 & 5]] [[columns 1 & 6]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | Eschr. leptocentrus (Do. [[Ditto for: Cetotherium]]) Total length, est. | 50 ft Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | Length of centrum | - - - Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - 1st Lumbar vertebra | - - Length of centrum | - - Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - 1st Caudal vertebra | - - Length of Autrum | - - Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - [[/columns 1 & 6]] [[columns 1 & 7]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | Meg. expansa (Siphono.) Total length, est. | Small 5√ Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | in 4√ Length of centrum | 2.75 Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.0 Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 2.67 1st Lumbar vertebra | - - Length of centrum | - - Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum | - - Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - [[/columns 1 & 7]] [[columns 1 & 8]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | Mesoteras Kerrianus Total length, est. | 75 - 80 ft Length of skull | 18 ft 1st Thoracic vertebra | 6√ Length of centrum | 7.0 Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 9.0 Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 8.5 1st Lumbar vertebra | - - Length of centrum | - - Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum | - - Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - [[/columns 1 & 8]] [[columns 1 & 9]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | Bal. physalus Gravesend Total length, est. | 60 ft Length of skull | 14 ft. 1st Thoracic vertebra | Length of centrum | 3.5 Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 11.75 Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 7.5 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum | 9.25 7√ Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 11.75 7√ Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 8.75 7√ 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum | 10.25 Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 12.5 Depth " [[Ditto for: of Autrum]] | 11.5 | Murie [[/columns 1 & 9]] [[columns 1 & 10]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | B. acuto rostrata Norway Total length, est. | [25 ft] Length of skull | 5 ft. 0 1/2 in 1st Thoracic vertebra | Length of centrum | 2.25 8√ Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 3.5 4√ 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum | 6.0 9√ Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.5 4√ 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of Autrum | - - Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 5.75 4√ | [[usum?]] [[/columns 1 & 10]] [[columns 1 & 11]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | Plesiocetus brailmontii Total length, est. | Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | Length of centrum | 2.75 Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum | 6.5 10√ Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 6.5 10√ Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 5.5 10√ 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum | 9.0 11√ Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 7.25 11√ Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 7.0 11√ | Van Ben [[/columns 1 & 11]] [[columns 1 & 12]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | P. subeus Total length, est. | Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | Length of centrum | 2.6 Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | - - Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.5 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum | 6.5 13√ Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 5.5 13√ Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 5.0 13√ 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of Autrum | 7.75 12√ Breadth " [[Ditto for: of Autrum]] | 5.8 12√ Depth " [[Ditto for: of Autrum]] | 6.5 12√ | Van Ben [[/columns 1 & 12]] [[blank separation column]] [[columns 1 & 13]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | P. bustoni Total length, est. | Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | Length of centrum |2.0 Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] |5.75 Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] |4.0 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum |- - - Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] |--- Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] |--- 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum |--- Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] |--- Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] |--- | Van Ben [[/columns 1 & 13]] [[columns 1 & 14]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | Meg. nodosa Total length, est. | 39'2 1/2" Length of skull | 10ft 5in 1st Thoracic vertebra | Length of centrum | 2.75 Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 8.4 Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 7.1 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum | 6.5 Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 9.9 Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 8.25 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum | 8.4 Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 10.9 Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 9.9 | Struthers [[/columns 1 & 14]] [[columns 1 & 15]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | Amphicetus verus Total length, est. | Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | Length of centrum | 2.4 Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 5.0 Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 3.75 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum | 4.75 7√ Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 5.5 7√ Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.25 7√ 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum |- - Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] |-- Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] |-- | Van Ben [[/columns 1 & 15]] [[columns 1 & 16]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | A. editus Total length, est. | Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | Length of centrum | 1.75 Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.5 Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 3.5 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum | 4.5 Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.25 Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 3.75 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum | -- Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- | do [[Ditto for: Van Ben]] [[/columns 1 & 16]] [[columns 1 & 17]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | A. rotundus Total length, est. | Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | Length of centrum |-- Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum | -- Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum | 6.0 Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 5.5 Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.75 | do [[Ditto for: Van Ben]] [[/columns 1 & 17]] [[columns 1 & 18]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | Heterocetus affinis Total length, est. | Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | Length of centrum | 1.5 Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 3.75 Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 2.75 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum | 4.75 7√ Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.0 7√ Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 3.5 7√ 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum | -- Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- | do [[Ditto for: Van Ben]] [[/columns 1 & 18]] [[columns 1 & 19]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | H. brevifrons Total length, est. | Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | Length of centrum | 1.4 Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 3.9 Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 2.4 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum | -- Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum | -- Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- | do [[Ditto for: Van Ben]] [[/columns 1 & 19]] [[columns 1 & 20]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | H. sprangii Total length, est. | Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | Length of centrum |1.1 Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 3.5 Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 2.75 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum | -- Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum | -- Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- | do [[Ditto for: Van Ben]] [[/columns 1 & 20]] [[columns 1 & 21]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | Mesocetus longirostrus Total length, est. | Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | Length of centrum | 1.5 Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.5 14√ Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 3.25 14√ 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum | -- Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum | -- Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- | do [[Ditto for: Van Ben]] [[/columns 1 & 21]] [[columns 1 & 22]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | M. pinuis Total length, est. | Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | Length of centrum | -- Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | -- 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum | 4.5 Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.5 Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.0 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum | 6.5 Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 5.5 12√ Depth " [[Ditto for: of Autrum]] | 5.25 12√ | do [[Ditto for: Van Ben]] [[/columns 1 & 22]] [[columns 1 & 23]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | Idiocetus laxatus Total length, est. | Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | Length of centrum | 1.5 Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 3.0 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum | {3.5 or 4.0 Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 3.5 7√ Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 3.2 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum | 4.7 15√ Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.5 15√ Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.1 15√ | do [[Ditto for: Van Ben]] [[/columns 1 & 23]] [[columns 1 & 24]] Vertebrae of fossil Whalebone Whales | I. longifrons Total length, est. | Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | Length of centrum | 2.75 14√ Breadth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.5 Depth " " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 3.5 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum | Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum | Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | | do [[Ditto for: Van Ben]] [[/columns 1 & 24]] [[annotations/footnotes at bottom of table]] 1√ no. not given 2√ ant. post.=7 3√ ant. " [[Ditto for: post.]] =6 4√ ant. 5√ "One of the smallest sps." 6√ Post 7√ 2d lumbar 8√ From Turner 9√ " " [[Dittos for: From Turner]] [[underlined]] last dorsal. [[/underlined]] 10√ 3d lumbar 11√ 2d caudal 12√ 4th caudal 13√ 4th lumbar 14√ 2d dorsal 15√ 3d caudal 16√ 2d dorsal from fig. 17√ From fig.
[[Right margin vertically]] [[underlined]] Balaendae [[/underlined]] [[/right margin]] [[Table with four columns]] [[column headings]] Vertebrae of fossil Right whales Balaenula balaenopsis Balaena primigenia Balaenotus insignis [[/column headings]] [[line headings]] Vertebrae of fossil Right whales Total length, est. Length of skull 1st Thoracic vertebra Length of centrum Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] 1st Lumbar vertebra Length of centrum Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] 1st Caudal vertebra Length of centrum Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] [[/line headings]] [[columns 1 & 2]] Vertebra of fossil Right whales | Balaenula balaenopsis Total length, est. | Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | in. Length of centrum | Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum | 2.5 1√ Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.5 1√ Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 3.5 1√ 1st Caudal vertebra | Lenth of centrum | 2.75 ? Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 5.5 Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.75 | Van Ben [[/columns 1 & 2]] [[columns 1 & 3]] Vertebra of fossil Right whales | Balaena primigenia Total length, est. | Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | in. Length of centrum | Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum | 9.75 2√ Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 12.0 2√ Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 10.5 2√ 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum | Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | | Van Ben [[columns 1 & 3]] [[columns 1 & 4]] Vertebra of fossil Right whales | Balaenotus insignis Total length, est. | Length of skull | 1st Thoracic vertebra | in. Length of centrum | 1.5 3√ Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 5.25 3√ Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 4.25 3√ 1st Lumbar vertebra | Length of centrum | 4.75 4√ Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 5.0 4√ 1st Caudal vertebra | Length of centrum | ? 4.75 5√ Breadth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 5.75 5√ Depth " [[Ditto for: of centrum]] | 5.75 5√ | Van Ben [[/columns 1 & 4]] [[line across page]] 1√ 11th dorsal 2√ 3d lumbar 3√ 3d dorsal 4√ 5th lumbar 5√ 11th " [[Ditto for: lumbar]] 6√ 5th caudal
^[[Balaenoptera ?]] (COPY). Pasadena, California, February 3, 1906. Smithsonian Inst. Dear Sir: We have discovered the skeleton of a large whale buried in a bog near the ocean. It is about 90 feet in length and apparently the bones are well preserved. It must have been stranded centuries ago, judging by the location. What is it worth to take it up carefully. If if is not secured, it will be carried away, piece by piece. Very respectfully yours, (Signed) Milton J. Becker.
[[underlined]] 2d. notice [[/underlined]] [[preprinted]] UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY LIBRARY WASHINGTON, D C., [[/preprinted]] June 3d [[preprinted]] , 190 [[/preprinted]] 5 [[preprinted]] Will you kindly return the work mentioned below, borrowed by you from the Library of the United States Geological Survey on the date named? Very respectfully [[/preprinted]] F.B. Weeks. [[preprinted]] Librarian [[/preprinted]] [[underlined]] Feb. 25, 1905 [[/underlined]] Geologische und Paleontologische Abhandlungen (Koken) N.F. Bd. 6.h.3. (Frass Neue zeug aus den unten etc. 1904 [[added in pencil]] Ret'r July 13 05 [[/added in pencil]]
[[preprinted]] Department of the Interior, U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. [[line]] OFFICIAL BUSINESS [[line]] Penalty for private use, $300 [[/preprinted]] [[Date stamped]] WASHINGTON JUN 3 1230 PM C 1905 [[/Date stamped]] Mr F. W. True. U. S. National Museum. City.
[[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM. [[line]] [[/preprinted]] [[underlined]] [[Ischrorhyuchus?]] [[/underlined]] & [[Pontriaya?]] Revista August. 1, 1891, p. 163 fig.72; p 165 fig. 73
[[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM. [[line]] [[/preprinted]] [[underlined]] Look up [[/underlined]] Basilosaurus [[underlined]] Agabelus P.A.P.S. 14'.75, 363 [[/underlined]] [[underlined]] Balaenoptera davidsoni [[/underlined]] [[line]] [[strikethrough]] Pontobasileus [[/strikethrough]] Rorqualis DeKay. N.Y. 131. See also lost card, Hitchcock Rept Geol. Mass., 1833, 193, pl. 12, figs 23 - 25, 28
[[preprinted]] Smithsonian Institution. United States National Museum [[/preprinted]] [[underlined]] Poulistes [[/underlined]] [[circled]] ? [[/circled]] Ame. Mus. Buenos Aures [[insertion]] ^ 19 [[/insertion]], 3, 1885 pl. 2 [[circled]] ? [[/circled]] [[underlined]] Agyrocetus [[/underlined]] & [[underlined]] Argyrodelphy [[/underlined]] No Anal. Mus. La Plata 2.1893. pls 5 & 6 [[underlined]] Pontoplanodes [[/underlined]] no [[Ave?]]. Mus. Buenos Aires 18, 1891, pl. 8.
[[preprinted]] Smithsonian Institution. UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM. [[line]] [[/preprinted]] PAUSP. - 1892 Am J. S - (4), [[strikethrough]] 11, 12, [[/strikethrough]] 11 - 17; (3) 43 18, 15, 20, 33, 38 Amer Nat. 25. 1891 WV Gidley has these books upstairs -
[[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM. [[line]] [[/preprinted]] Bowers, S- [[line across page]] Fossil vertebrates in Ventura, Cal. < Amer. Geol., 4, 1889. 391-2
[[written sideways]] 14 4 ___ 56
[[underlined]] Fossil Cat. [[/underlined]] PZS. 1899, 919 [[strikethrough]] Anieghino - Sinopsis Geol. - paleontol. 1898 folio - [[underlined]] Suppl. [[/underlined]] 1899 - (p. 8)[[/strikethrough]] [[strikethrough]] Stefano -
[[preprinted]] THE WOMAN'S COLLEGE, BALTIMORE. OFFICE OF THE CURATOR. [[/preprinted]] April 17, 1907 My dear Dr. True Your esteemed letter of the 3rd inst. came duly to hand. The Cetacean fossils remain in the preparation room where they will be quite safe until you are ready to take up the work again. We certainly want to hear your lecture on "The Life of a Whale". On what terms are you willing to give it and how would the first [[insertion]] ^ or second [[/insertion]] Monday evening in May suit you. The number of subscribers for the Natural Bridge - Luray excursion is not quite sufficient to warrant our proceeding with it, and no doubt the Wash[[superscript]] n [[/superscript]] people can [[?]] [[?]] [[search?]] Luray direct from Wash[[superscript]] n [[/superscript]]. I will enclose a couple of circulars anyway, and with best thanks [[underlined]] P.t.o. [[/underline]] [[watermark]] [[image - "FRENCH" and a fleur de lis]] [[/watermark]]
for you kind offer of cooperation, remain Sincerely yours, [[signature]] L Bibbins [[/signature]] Dr. F. W. True Washington You will perhaps be interested to know that Mrs. Bibbins has just closed a contract with Putmans Sons, N.Y. for an illustrated volume to be sutitled "The Historic Chesapeake" It is more than likely that the proposed lecture may appear under the auspices of the "Maryland Field Theories" course for Teachers, Dr. Knowlton may give us another on "The Birds of the World" but I am not yet sure we can have [[insertion]] ^ either before Autumn [[/insertion]] Thank you very much for your paper on Agrophius. What a pity it was lost for no doubt there are others awaiting the patient collector.
[[preprinted]] THE WOMAN'S COLLEGE, BALTIMORE OFFICE OF THE CURATOR [[/preprinted]] March 28th, 1907 [[insertion]] Ansd Apr 3 [[/insertion]] My dear Dr. True: Coming home I find your letter of the 19th inst. I would much prefer that the excavating be done by an expert preparator- but should you wish the work done before such will be available, I would be willing to let Brough try his hand. He has done a great deal of skillful work of various kinds and would be very careful indeed. The material will be perfectly safe where it is, so please take your own time. Any of your friends who may come to join us for Natural Bridge & Luray will be welcome, Sincerely [[signature]] A Bibbins [[/signature]] [[line]] [[underlined]] P.t.o [[/underlined]] Dr.F.W. True Washington
I have examined your monograph on the whales with a great deal of interest, and as soon as possible we want to arrange to have you speak to the students regarding your work.
[[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION Washington, D.C., [[/preprinted]] 2 - 6 - [[preprinted]], 190 [[/preprinted]]7 Dear Doctor True: A copy of your work on Whales has been sent to Dr. A. B. Bibbins Truely yours, Cyrus Adler [[stamped]] Assistant Secretary, in charge of Library and Exchanges. [[/stamped]]
[[watermark, reversed]] FRENCH [[image - fleur de lis]] [[/watermark]] [[preprinted]] THE WOMAN'S COLLEGE, BALTIMORE. [[/preprinted]] Jan. 29th '07 [[insertion]] Ans'd [[underlined]] Jan. 30 [[/underlined]] [[/insertion]] My dear D[[superscript]] r [[/superscript]] True: Your letter of yesterday is received. You will be most welcome to study the Cope types. We recall your several most acceptable courtesies to the College, notably the transfer of the mounted mammals from the National Museum to us a few years since, though you would be just as welcome to the favor you ask aside from that. Though we will be pleased to see you here as often as you care to come, it occurs to me that you might like to have the skulls &c in your own laboratory while you are making your notes. If so this can readily be arranged. One of the skulls was broken
[[watermark]] [[image - fleur de lis]] FRENCH LINEN [[/watermark]] [[preprinted]] THE WOMAN'S COLLEGE, BALTIMORE. [[/preprinted]] slightly when it was transferred from Cope's laboratory - but the plaster restoration damaged can readily be repaired by yr preparator no doubt. Our collections are growing slowly but quite satisfactorily our latest finds bring a mastodon tooth [[insertion]] ^ in situ [[/insertion]] from the Piedmont highlands and a lower cretaceous [[underline]] palm [[/underline]] from near Balt [[superscript]] [[underlined]] o [[/underlined]] [[/superscript]]. As interesting as this - to me - is the recent recovery from long oblivion of Cha[[superscript]] [[underlined]] s [[/underlined]] [[/superscript]] Wilson Peale's painting - the exhuming of the First Newburg Mastodon, in 1801 - an account of which I will shortly publish. Any time you have duplicate illustration material, along [[underline]] any [[/underline]] line whatever, which you can readily spare, we will be glad to have you bear us in mind as you have so kindly
[[watermark]] LINEN [[/watermark]] [[preprinted]] THE WOMAN'S COLLEGE, BALTIMORE. [[/preprinted]] done in years past. With best of good wishes for the prosperity of your great enterprise under its new head, I remain Sincerely yours, [[signature]] A Bibbins [[/signature]] S.F.W. True U.S. National Museum
[[preprinted letterhead]] S. L. Patterson Commissioner of Agriculture and Immigration. T. K. Bruner, Secretary. State Chemist. H.H. Brimley, Curator State Museum. North Carolina Department of Agriculture Raleigh. Tait Butler, State Veterinarian Franklin Sherman, State Entomologist Gerald McCarthy, Botanist and Biologist W. N. Hutt, Horticulturalist. Brandan Printing Co. Nashville [[/preprinted letterhead]] [[typed in purple ink]] April 18, 1908. ^[[Arrd Apr 28]] Dear Doctor True: I have your favor of the 17th inst. Regarding fossil cetaceans from this State I would say that we have a few specimens in the Museum that were here before I took charge and of which the identity is somewhat uncertain. In Kerrs Geology of North Carolina, Vol. 1, appears a description of a new species, Mesoterus Kerrianus. Cope, and of that we have (or, rather, I [[underlined]] think [[/underlined]] these specimens refer to this species) a basal piece of one mandible and two or three vertebrae. I am under the impression that the larger fragments from which this specimen was identified were sent to the Nat^[[i]]onal museum by my predecessor, Thos. C. Harris, about 1894. We have thre^[[e]] other vertebrae that I think are those described by Cope on page 49 of Appendix B, of the above mentioned work. [[vertical pencil line in left margin]] Previous to my connection with the Museum in 1895 there was quite a large and varied collection of fossils in the Museum but from lack of care and cataloguing most of the labels had been either [[/vertical pencil line in left margin]] lost or eaten off the specimens by insects and the identity [[f typed over o]] of many of them lost. Most of them are still packed away here but in the absence of any locality labels, their usefullness is not what it otherwise might have been. Yours very truly, [[signature]] H. H. Brimley [[/signature]] Curator.
^[[B Fossil Whales]] [[preprinted]] MUSÉE ROYAL BRUXELLES, le ^[[I. XII.]] 190^[[7]] D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE DE BELGIQUE [[line]] No. [[line]] ANNEXE [[/preprinted]] Mon cher Confrère, En rèponse à votre lettre du 20 Novembre écoulé, j'ai l'honneur de vous informer que je vais mettre, incessamment, à l'impression un [[underlined]] Catalogue des Odontocètes fossiles d'Anvers [[/underlined]] par le Docteur Abel. Votre dévoué, L. Dollo Conservateur.
[[underlined]] U.S. America [[/underlined]] (printed?) [[image - Stamp]] [[Franked]] Bologna 6 5 08 11S (Ferrovia) [[/Franked]] To Prof. Frederick W. [[underlined]] True [[/underlined]] Head Curator Department of Biology [[underlined]] U.S. National Museum [[/underlined]] [[underlined]] Smithsonian Institution [[/underlined]] D. C. [[double underlined]] Washington [[/double underlined]]
Prof. Giovanni Capellini Senatore del Regno Bologna [[strikethrough]] e Porto Venere [[/strikethrough]]
Art. XII.--[[underlined]] On the Tertiary Strata of the Islands of Martha's Vineyard in Massachusetts [[/underlined]]; by Charles Lyell, Esq., V.P.G.S., &c.* The most northern limit to which the tertiary strata bordering the Atlantic have been traced in the United States, is in Massachusetts, in Martha's Vineyard,lat. 41° 20' north, an island about twenty miles in length from east to west, and about ten from north to south, and rising to the height of between two and three hundred feet above the sea. The tertiary strata of this island are, for the most part, deeply buried beneath a mass of drift, in which lie huge erratic blocks of granite and other rocks, which appear to have come from the north, probably from the mountains of New Hampshire. The tertiary strata consist of white and green sands, a conglomerate, white, blue, yellow, and blood-red clays, and black layers of lignite, all inclined at a high angle to the northeast, and in some of their curves quite vertical. They are finely exposed near Chilmark on the southwest side of the island, and in the promontory of Gay Head at its southwestern extremity, where there is a vertical section of more than two hundred feet in height. [[line across page]] ^[[*]]From the Proceedings of the London Geol.Soc.Vol.IV No. 92
2 Attention was first called to this formation by Prof. Hitchcock in 1823, who appears to be the only American geologist who has examined them personally. He compared the beds at Gay Head to the plastic and London clays of Alum Bay in the Isle of Wight, to which, lithologically, they bear a striking resemblance, consisting in both cases of variously and brightly colored clays and sands with lignite, all incoherent and highly inclined. Various opinions, however, have been put forth as to the relative age of the Martha's Vineyard strata, which were assigned by Prof. Hitchcock, at a time when the tertiary formations of the United States were less known, to the eocene period, while Dr. Morton supposed them to be in part only tertiary, and that they rested on green-sand of the cretaceous period. The section at Gay Head is continuous for four fifths of a mile; the beds dip to the northeast generally at an angle of from thirty five to fifty degrees, though in some places at seventy degrees. The clays predominate over the sands. In one place Mr. Lyell found a great fold in the beds, in which the same osseous conglomerate and associated beds of white sand, on the whole fifty feet thick, were so bent as to have twice
3 a northeasterly, and once a southwesterly dip. In the yellowish and dark brown clay near the uppermost part of the section at Gay Head, and in the green-sand immediately resting upon it^[[†]], Mr. Lyell found the teeth of a shark, that of a seal, vertebrae of Cetacea, crustacean remains, and casts of [[underlined]] Tellina [[/underlined]] and [[underlined]] Mya [[/underlined]]. These prevail at intervals through a thickness of nearly one hundred feet, and are followed by beds of sand and clay with lignite. Mr. Lyell found no remains in the red clays. Many rolled bones were found in the osseous conglomerate. In the section at Chilmark similar strata to those at Gay Head occur, but the general dip is southwest. Some of the folds, however, give anticlinal dips to the northeast as well as the southwest, and there are many irregularities, the beds being sometimes vertical and twisted in every direction. Several faults are seen, and veins of iron-sand, which intersect the strata like narrow dykes, as if there had been cracks filled from above. One bed of osseous conglomerate at Chilmark, four yards in thickness, is vertical, and its strike is well seen to be north 25° east, so that the disturbances have evidently been so great that it would be difficult with- [[line across page]] † Nos. 5 and 6 of Prof. Hitchcock's section.
4 out more sections to determine positively the prevailing strike of these beds. The incumbent drift is very variable in thickness, and large erratics, from twenty to thirty feet in diameter, are seen resting on quartzose sand. The author saw no grounds for concluding that any cretaceous strata occur any where in the island, nor could he find any fossils which appeared to have been washed out of a cretaceous formation into the tertiary strata, as some have suggested. My Lyell proceeds to the consideration of the organic remains collected by himself in Martha's Vineyard. [[underlined]] Mammalia [[/underlined]].-- A tooth, identified by Prof. Owen as the canine tooth of a seal, of which the crown is fractured. It seems nearly allied to the modern [[underlined]] Cystophora proboscidea. [[/underlined]] 2. A skull of a walrus, differing from the skulls of the existing species ([[underlined]] Trichecus rosmarus [[/underlined]], Linn.), with which it was compared by Prof. Owen, in having only six molars and two tusks, whereas those of the recent have four molars on each side, besides occasionally a rudimentary one. The front tusk is rounder than that of the recent walrus.
5 3. Vertebrae of [[underlined]] Cetacea [[/underlined]], some of which are referred by Prof. Owen to the Whalebone whales, and others to the Bottle-nosed ([[underlined]] Hyperoodon [[/underlined]]). [[underlined]] Pisces [[/underlined]].-- Teeth of sharks resembling species from the Faluns of Touraine, viz. [[underlined]] Carcharias megaladon, Oxyrhina xiphodon, O. hastulis [[/underlined]], and [[underlined]] Lamna cuspidata [[/underlined]]. With these were large teeth of two species of [[underlined]] Carcharias [[/underlined]], one resembling [[underlined]] C. productus [[/underlined]], a Maltese fossil. With the exception of the two last, Mr. Lyell found the same species in meiocene strata near Evergreen, on the right bank of James River in Virginia. [[underlined]] Crustacea [[/underlined]].-- A species considered by Mr. Adam White as probably belonging to the genus [[underlined]] Cyclograpsus [[/underlined]], or the closely allied [[underlined]] Sesarma [[/underlined]] of Say, and another, decidedly a [[underlined]] Gegarcimus [[/underlined]]. [[underlined]] Mollusca [[/underlined]].--1. Casts of a [[underlined]] Tellina [[/underlined]] allied to [[underlined]] T. biplicata [[/underlined]], a meiocene fossil, and of another near [[underlined]] T. lusoria [[/underlined]]. 2. Cast of a [[underlined]] Cytherea [[/underlined]] resembling [[underlined]] C. Sayana [[/underlined]], Conrad. 3. Three casts of a [[underlined]] Mya [[/underlined]], one of which bears close resemblance to [[underlined]] Mya truncata [[/underlined]]. Mr. Lyell concludes, from the various evidence here given, that the strata of Martha's Vineyard are meiocene. The numerous remains of Cetacea of the genera [[underlined]] Balaena [[/underlined]] and
6 [[underlined]] Hyperoodon [[/underlined]] are adverse to the supposition of their being eocene, while such fossils abound in the meiocene beds of America. The other fossils all point to a similar conclusion. ^[[
[[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM. [[line]] MEMORANDUM. _ [[/preprinted]] Go on steamer to Currioman Wharf - Write to Fr. Wm Linton, or Capt. Reed, who keeps boats, [[line]] Edward H. Latch 2d auditor's Office
Collecting Ground
[[image: hand-drawn map of the Potomac River running right to left, showing Virginia, Maryland, Nomini Bay and River, Currioman Bay, Beal's and Currioman Wharfs, "Cape" Reid, F.W. Linton, and Nomini Cliffs]] [[image labels]] Nomini River Beal's Whf Nomini Bay "Cape" Reid F. Wm Linton Currioman Wharf Currioman Bay [[arrow pointing left]] Potomac Va Nomini Cliffs Md [[/image labels]]
[[preprinted]] Smithsonian Institution United States National Museum [[line]] Memorandum [[/preprinted]] Feb. 2. 1906. Lady calling at the Museum to-day said that Jas. T. Thomas lived formerly in Charles Co. Md. at a place called Brook(side?) [[insertion]] (in-field?) [[/insertion]] below Benedict on the Pahixent R.; that it was sandy there & had formerly been a large Indian encampment there; Mr. (or Dr.) Thomas was now dead & the family had moved to Balto. There were many fossils to be had at Parker's Wharf & at Jones Wharf. There was a doctor [[insertion]] ^ (Dr. Mc [[underlined]] something [[/underlined]]) [[/insertion]] living near Parker's wharf who had done a good deal for the U.S. Geol. Survey people. There are 2 boarding - houses at Governor's Run., right near the wharf. There are more fossils there than at Plum Pt.
[[preprinted]] Smithsonian Institution United States National Museum [[line]] Memorandum [[/preprinted]] C.B. = Chesapeake Beach Platanistidae [[underlined]] Heterodelphis klinderi [[/underlined]] - Teeth too small - 10 in 5 cm Symphysis short [[underlined]] Cyrtodelphis sulcatus [[/underlined]] (= [[underlined]] Schizodelphis canaliculatus [[/underlined]]) Brandt, Pl. 26 figs 28-29 - Teeth about same size, but mandible much wider. [[underline]] Acrodelphis / or champso) letochae [[/underline]] Brandt pl. 28. Teeth too near together. 5 teeth = 2 to 2 1/2 cm. Width less near symphysis, - 1.7 cm. Length to symphysis in frequent 17.8 cm against 30 cm in CB. specimen Acrodelphis ombonii - teeth about same size [[insertion]] ^ & distance apart [[/insertion]] - mandible much wider, about 3.8 cm near symphysis
C [[underlined]] Nomini [[/underlined]] [[preprinted]] (4185-20 M.) United States National Museum. [[line]] MEMORANDUM. [/preprinted] F Marshall Hall Md. Apr. 25. 1886 Dear Sir Your letter of the 22d inst. to hand Saturday 24th. Currioman the largest marl deposit upon the Potomac is from 55 to 60 miles from Washington upon the Va. side. The deposit is said to open for 6 or 8 miles upon the river showing very remarkable fossils. The Tertiary deposit is some distance up the cliff the bottom of the cliff is said to contain much wood leaves, &c., if so then we have the Cretaceous open
[[preprinted]] (4185-20 M.) United States National Museum [[line]] MEMORANDUM. [/preprinted] with the Miocene or the Tertiary. From all I have heard and from specimen given by sailors it must be a very interesting locality x I tried once to see it but failed. I went down there but could not get board so had to leave with my finger in my mouth- I would advise you to go down on the river steamers prepared with a tent to go to housekeeping upon your own [[strikethrough]] hoof [[/strikethrough]] hook- xxx I shall write this week to Jude Stuart of Alexandria, Va. for a letter to his brother Dr Stuart who lives near the cliffs, who at least if he cannot give us board can help us in
[[preprinted]] (4185-20 M.) United States National Museum. [[line]] MEMORANDUM. [[/preprinted]] what we want to do. &c Don't go down so far in a small boat; the weather may prove unfavorable & therefore the trip [[strikethrough]] proof [[/strikethrough]] prove a failure. Carry picks and spades. xxx Yours truly Oliver N. Bryan -
[[double underlined]] Calvert formation - Miocene At Chesapeake Beach. Md. [[/double underlined]] [[image - detailed drawing with numbered strata of soil with notes on each strata]] [[notes on each strata in three columns, first describing depth, second numbering the particular strata and third describing strata. There is an arrow pointing from each description in column 3 to the numbered strata in column 2.]] | 15 | Yellow sandy clay _____ | 14 | Yellow sandy clay _____ 32' | 13 | Blue sandy clay changing to yellow brown sandy clay in the upper 12 ft., fossiliferous throughout upper portions _____ 2'6" | 12 | Green. brown sandy clay, with fossil casts _____ 5' | 11 | Green. brown sandy clay. _____ 6' | 10 | Gray, green sand, with some clay & fossils, as below. * _____ 6' | 9 | Green, sandy clay with scattered layers of [[underlined]] Corbula elevata [[/underlined]] _____ 9' | 8 | Green, sandy clay; no fossils _____ 6' | 7 | Green, sandy clay with scattered layers of [[underlined]] Corbula elevata [[/underlined]] _____ 8' | 6 | Green, sandy clay, carrying numerous Corbula elevata _____ 7' | 5 | Green, sandy clay carrying [[underlined]] Thracia conradi [[/underlined]] _____ 0'6" | 4 | Greenish sandy clay carrying [[underlined]] Ostrea pererassa [[underlined]] _____ 62' | 1.2.& 3 | Bluish-green sandy clay revealed in well-boring Eocene | [[image - drawing of soil]] | Glauconitic sandy clay [[boxed]] * Turritella indentata Phacoides anadonta Crassatellities melinus Astarte cuneiformis Ostraea sellaeformis Pecten madisonius Macrocallista marylandica Atrina barrisii Arca subrostrata [[strikethrough]] Glycimeris parilis &c [[/strikethrough]] [[/boxed]]
Smithsonian Institution, U.S. National Museum, Order No. [[stamped]] 36631 [[/stamped]] Washington, ^[[April 19.]], 190^[[5]] To ^[[Dr. F.W. True Head Curator, Dep't Biology.]] Please furnish the following articles, SENDING ALL BILLS in duplicate (marked with the number of this order), to the Property Clerk. Richard Rathbun, Assistant Secretary. ^[[Allotment for collecting specimens of Fossil Cetaceans, and comparing specimens already in the museum with the types and other collections, during the fiscal year 1904 - 1905 - [[underlined]] $50.00 [[/underlined]] [[line]] ]] Itemized bill should be rendered monthly.
Smithsonian Institution, U.S. National Museum, Order No. [[stamp]] 37488 [[/stamp]] Washington, ^[[September 23]], 190^[[5]] To ^[[Dr. F W True. USNM]] Please furnish the following articles, SENDING ALL BILLS in duplicate (marked with the number of this order), to the Property Clerk. Richard Rathbun, Assistant Secretary. ^[[-Allotment- For collecting specimens of Fossil Cetaceans, and comparing specimens already in the Museum, with types of other collections during fiscal year 1905-1906- From Sept. 20-Dec 31. $90~ [[line]] ]] Itemized bill should be rendered monthly.
[[preprinted]] WINTER 1908-1909. Chesapeake and York River Lines CHESAPEAKE STEAMSHIP COMPANY [[image - steamship on a river, with a red background R\ blue background N flag in the sky above]] FOR BALTIMORE, PHILADELPHIA, NEW YORK AND ALL POINTS NORTH,EAST&WEST E. E. FOSTER, General Manager. E. J. CHISM, G neral Passenger Agent. T. H. MCDANNEL, Assistant General Passenger Agent. [[/preprinted]]
BAYLINE BALTIMORE OLD POINT COMFORT NORFOLK, PORTSMOUTH AND ALL POINTS SOUTH. BEST LINE BETWEEN NORTH AND SOUTH [[image - Red flag emblazoned with a white 'B']] BALTIMORE STEAM PACKET CO. JOHN R. SHERWOOD, PRES. & GEN'L MANAGER. E. BROWN, GENERAL PASSENGER AGENT. CHARLES C. GARRETT, TRAV. PASSENGER AGENT. PIERS, 10-13 LIGHT ST., BALTIMORE, MD. Foot of Barre St. NOVEMBER, 1908. E. B. READ & SON CO., PRS., BALTO., MD.
Chesapeake Beach Railway [[image]] SCHEDULE OF Local Passenger Trains CORRECTED TO OCTOBER 6, 1907 SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE [[image]] PAUL Y. WATERS, General Manager.
[[preprinted page]] CHESAPEAKE BEACH RAILWAY Schedule of Local Passenger Trains Effective Sunday, October 6, 1907 SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE EASTBOUND-TO THE BEACH. [[table with five columns]] [[column headers]] [[first column has no title]] Week Days | Sundays 101 | 103 11 | 13 A.M. | P.M. A.M. | P.M. [[/column headers]] Baltimore (B&O) Lv | 7 20 | 3 05 | ..... | ..... Washingt'n (B&O) Lv | 8 30 | 4 45 | ..... | .... Hyattsville (C.B.) | 8 55 | 5 07 | ..... | ..... s Chesapeake Jct | 9 10 | 5 23 | ..... | ..... [[underlined]] s District Line | 9 25 | 5 40 | 10 00 | 5 40 [[/underlined]] ƒ Brooks | 9 30 | 5 44 | 10 03 | 5 43 ƒ Behrend | 9 32 | 5 46 | 10 05 | 5 45 ƒ Berry | 9 34 | 5 47 | 10 07 | 5 47 ƒ Ritchie | 9 39 | 5 50 | 10 10 | 5 50 ƒ Marr | 9 47 | 5 57 | 10 17 | 5 57 ƒ Brown | 9 50 | 6 00 | 10 20 | 6 00 ƒ Hills | 9 52 | 6 02 | 10 22 | 6 02 ƒ Clagett | 9 55 | 6 04 | 10 24 | 6 04 s Upper Marlboro | 10 07 | 6 10 | 10 30 | 6 10 ƒ Penna. Junction | 10 12 | 6 14 | 10 34 | 6 14 ƒ Mt. Calvert | 10 18 | 6 19 | 10 39 | 6 19 ƒ Pindell | 10 26 | 6 24 | 10 44 | 6 24 ƒ Lyons Creek | 10 31 | 6 27 | 10 47 | 6 27 ƒ Chaney | 10 36 | 6 32 | 10 52 | 6 32 ƒ Wilson | 10 41 | 6 35 | 10 55 | 6 35 ƒ Owings | 10 47 | 6 40 | 11 00 | 6 40 ƒ Mt. Harmony | 10 52 | 6 44 | 11 04 | 6 44 ƒ Pushaw | 10 57 | 6 55 | 11 15 | 6 55 Chesa. Beach .. Ar. | 11 05 | 6 55 | 11 15 | 6 55 [[blank]] | A.M. | P.M. | A.M. | P.M. [[end table]] s Regular stop. ƒ Stop on signal or notice to conductor. [[end page]] [[start page]] [[preprinted page]] WESTBOUND-FROM THE BEACH [[table with five columns]] [[column headers]] [[first column has no title]] Week Days | Sundays 102 | 104 10 | 12 A.M. | P.M. A.M. | P.M. [[/column headers]] Chesa. Beach .. Lv. | 6 40 | 2 20 | 7 00 | 4 00 ƒ Pushaw | 6 47 | 2 27 | 7 07 | 4 07 ƒ Mt. Harmony | 6 51 | 2 32 | 7 11 | 4 11 ƒ Owings | 6 55 | 2 37 | 7 15 | 4 15 ƒ Wilson | 7 00 | 2 43 | 7 20 | 4 20 ƒ Chaney | 7 02 | 2 47 | 7 22 | 4 22 ƒ Lyons Creek | 7 07 | 2 53 | 7 27 | 4 27 ƒ Pindell | 7 11 | 2 58 | 7 31 | 4 31 ƒ Mt. Calvert | 7 16 | 3 04 | 7 36 | 4 36 ƒ Penna. Junction | 7 20 | 3 10 | 7 40 | 4 40 s Upper Marlboro | 7 25 | 3 15 | 7 45 | 4 45 ƒ Clagett | 7 30 | 3 21 | 7 50 | 4 50 ƒ Hills | 7 33 | 3 25 | 7 53 | 4 53 ƒ Brown | 7 35 | 3 28 | 7 55 | 4 55 ƒ Marr | 7 38 | 3 31 | 7 58 | 4 58 ƒ Ritchie | 7 44 | 3 39 | 8 04 | 5 04 ƒ Berry | 7 47 | 3 43 | 8 07 | 5 07 ƒ Behrend | 7 49 | 3 45 | 8 08 | 5 10 ƒ Brooks | 7 52 | 3 48 | 8 10 | 5 12 s District Line | 7 55 3 55 | 8 15 | 5 15 s Chesapeake Jct. Ar | 8 02 | 4 02 | ..... | .... Hyattsv'e (B&O) Lv. | 8 43 | 4 55 | ..... | ..... Baltimore (B&O) Ar. | 10 10 | 5 45 | ..... | .... [[blank]] | A.M. | P.M. | A.M. | P.M. [[end table]] This time table shows the time at which trains may be expected to arrive at and depart from the station named, but their arrival or departure at the time stated is not guaranteed, nor does the Company hold itself responsible for any delay or any consequences arising therefrom. PAUL Y. WATERS, Gen. Mgr.
SHAW BROS., PRINT. [[line]] [[image: logo]] [[image caption]] Allied Printing Trades Council Union Label Washington 59 [[/image caption]] [[line]] 716 14TH STREET.
CHESAPEAKE ...BEACH... RAILWAY. [[image]] Schedule -OF- Local Passenger Trains. CORRECTED TO SEPTEMBER 25, 1904. Subject to change without notice. PAUL Y. WATERS, General Manager.
[[preprinted]] CHESAPEAKE BEACH RAILWAY Schedule of Local Passenger Trains Effective Sunday, September 25, 1904. Subject to chance without notice. Showing connection with B.&O.R.R. at Hyattsville, Md. EAST BOUND-TO THE BEACH. [[table with five columns]] [[column headers]] [[first column has no title]] Week Days | Sundays 101 | 103 11 | 13 A.M. | P.M. A.M. | P.M. [[/column headers]] Chesapeake Junct.Lv. 9 10 | 5 23 | .... | .... DISTRICT LINE 9 25 | 5 40 | 10 00 | 5 40 Seat Pleasant 9 28 | 5 42 | 10 02 | 5 42 Berry ........ 9 34 | 5 47 | 10 07 | 5 47 Ritchie ...... 9 39 | 5 50 | 10 10 | 5 50 Marr ........ 9 47 | 6 57 | 10 17 | 5 57 Brown ........ 9 50 | 6 00 | 10 20 | 6 00 Hills ........ 9 52 | 6 02 | 10 22 | 6 02 Clagett ...... 9 55 | 6 04 | 10 24 | 6 04 Upper Marlboro 10 07 | 6 10 | 10 30 | 6 10 Penna. Junction 10 12 | 6 14 | 10 34 | 6 14 Mt. Calvert 10 18 | 6 19 | 10 39 | 6 19 Pindell 10 26 | 6 24 | 10 44 | 6 24 Lyons Creek 10 31 | 6 27 | 10 47 | 6 27 Chaney 10 36 | 6 32 | 10 52 | 6 32 Wilson 10 41 | 6 35 | 10 55 | 6 35 Owings 10 47 | 6 40 | 11 00 | 6 40 Mt. Harmony 10 52 | 6 44 | 11 04 | 6 44 Pushaw 10 57 | 6 48 | 11 08 | 6 48 CHESAPEAKE BEACH Ar. 11 05 | 6 55 | 11 15 | 6 55 A. M. | P. M.| A.M. | P.M. [[/table]] [[end page]] [[start page]] [[preprinted page]] WESTBOUND-FROM THE BEACH [[table with five columns]] [[column headers]] [[first column has no title]] Week Days | Sundays 102 | 104 10 | 12 A.M. | P.M. A.M. | P.M. [[/column headers]] CHESAPEAKE BEACH Lv.. 6 40 | 2 20 | 7 05 | 4 00 Pushaw..... 6 47 | 2 27 | 7 12 | 4 07 Mt. Harmony...... 6 51 | 2 32 | 7 16 | 4 11 Owings........ 6 55 | 2 37 | 7 20 | 4 15 Wilson........ 7 00 | 2 43 | 7 25 | 4 20 Chaney ...... 7 02 | 2 47 | 7 27 | 4 22 Lyons Creek... 7 07 | 2 53 | 7 32 | 4 27 Pindell ...... 7 11 | 2 58 | 7 36 | 4 31 Mt. Calvert... 7 16 | 3 04 | 7 41 | 4 36 Penna. Junction 7 20 | 3 10 | 7 45 | 4 40 Upper Marlboro 7 25 | 3 15 | 7 50 | 4 45 Clagett 7 30 | 3 21 | 7 55 | 4 50 Hills 7 33 | 3 25 | 7 58 | 4 53 Brown 7 35 | 3 28 | 8 00 | 4 55 Marr 7 38 | 3 31 | 8 03 | 4 58 Ritchie 7 44 | 3 39 | 8 09 | 5 04 Berry 7 47 | 3 43 | 8 12 | 5 07 Seat Pleasant 7 53 | 3 52 | 8 18 | 5 13 DISTRICT LINE 7 55 | 3 55 | 8 20 | 5 15 Chesapeake Junct. Ar. 8 02 | 4 02 | .... | .... A. M.| P. M.| A.M. | P.M. [[/table]] Columbia Electric Car leaving 15th St. and N.Y. Ave. N.W., at 8.45 a.m. on week days, runs direct to District Line Station to connect with C.B. Ry. Train No. 101. This Time Table shows the time at which trains may be expected to arrive at and depart from the station named, but their arrival or departure at the time stated is not guaranteed, nor does the Company hold itself responsible for any delay or any consequences arising therefrom. PAUL Y. WATERS, Gen'l Manager.
[[blank page]]
C = [[underlined]] Collect - locality [[/underlined]] Patuxentr R. [[preprinted]] Form 303 [[Line]] 3 M.2-05 MARYLAND, DELAWARE & VIRGINIA RAILWAY CO. [[line]] OFFICE AGENT PIERS 2-8-9 LIGHT STREET. ^[[D]].W. DOWNEY, AGENT. BALTIMORE, ^[[MAY 10"]] 190^[[5]] [[/preprinted]] Dr. F.W. True Ans'd May 11/05 Washington DC. Dear Sir. I am in receipt of your letter 9th relation Patuxent River. Advise you can occupy State Rooms on Steamer Friday Night, and can get meals on board Steamer Sunday or on round trip if desired. If you will notify me in advance I will gladly reserve you a nice room and make arrangements for your trip. Yours truly D.W. Downey Agent
[[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM. [[line]] [[/preprinted]] R.R. Balto. & return 2.00 Str. round trip 2.50 9 meals @ 50 [[superscript, underlined]] ct [[/superscript, underlined]] 4.50 [[line under column of numbers]] 9.00 Inc. 1.00 [[line under column of numbers]] 10.00
[[preprinted]] Form 303 [[line]] 3 M. 2-05 MARYLAND, DELAWARE & VIRGINIA RAILWAY CO. [[line]] OFFICE AGENT PIERS 2-8-9 LIGHT STREET. E.W. DOWNEY, AGENT. Baltimore, [[dotted line]] [[/preprinted]] May 8 [[preprinted]] 190 [[/preprinted]] 5 Dr. F W. True Dr Sir Replying to yours of 6th Inst will say that Stmr. St Marys leaves Pier #8 Baltimore every Wednesday and Saturday at 6 [[underlined superscript]] 30 [[/underlined superscript]] A.M. for Fair Haven Plum Pt Grovenors Run and points on Patuxent river as far as Benedict arriving at Fair Haven about 10.30 A.M. Plum Pt 11 [[underlined superscript]] 30 [[/underlined superscript]] A.M. Gov Run 1 P.M. and Benedict about 11 P.M. Returning Stmr. leaves Benedict every Monday and Thursday at 5 [[underlined superscript]] 30 [[/underlined superscript]] AM Gov. Run 12 N. Plum Pt 1 P.M. Fair Haven 2 [[underlined superscript]] 30 [[/underlined superscript]] arriving in Balto about 6 [[underlined superscript]] 30 [[/underlined superscript]] P.M.
[[preprinted]] Form 303 [[line]] 3 M.2-05 MARYLAND, DELAWARE & VIRGINIA RAILWAY CO. [[line]] OFFICE AGENT PIERS 2-8-9 LIGHT STREET. E.W. DOWNEY, AGENT Baltimore, 190 [[/preprinted]] [[circled]] 2 [[/circled]] Stmr Lancaster leaves Pier #2 Baltimore every Sunday at 8 [[superscript]][[underlined]] 00 [[/underlined]][[/superscript]] P.M. for Benedict [[underlined]] direct [[/underlined]] arriving at Benedict in time to transfer passengers to Stmr St. Mary's that she might land them at their desired destinations while on her way to Balto on [[underlined]] Monday [[/underlined]]. The Fare is $1[[superscript]][[underlined]] 50 [[/underlined]][[/superscript]] straight, $2.50 for round trip - good for 60 days. Meals 50¢ each, state rooms (2 berths) 50-1[[superscript]][[underlined]] 00 [[/underlined]][[/superscript]] or 1[[superscript]][[underlined]] 50 [[/underlined]][[/superscript]] according to sized. - There is no reduction for party of four. Yrs truly D.W. Downey Agt [[underlined]] B [[/underlined]]
[[insertion]] C. [[/insertion]] "Lower down on the York river the Miocene is met with once more six miles above Yorktown and again at the famous locality, Bellefield, where it is packed with fossil remains of the most varied character, many of them in [[strikethrough]] the [[/strikethrough]] a most perfect state of preservation. Yorktown affords another fine exposure of Miocene fossils, although they are not as abundant as at Bellefield. " On the James river the Miocene extends from Richmond some distance down the streams but finally disappears beneath its surface as the banks become occupied by younger material. The only other exposures in this river of importance are found at Kings Mill in the vicinity of Williamsburg - At this place, the river has cut into a bank exposing a cliff crowded with finely preserved Miocene fossils - " (p.lxviii)
[[insertion]] C/ [[/insertion]] [[underlined]] Maryland Miocene . Geographical [[/underlined]] [[line across page]] [[underlined]] Charles County near the Patuxent R. [[/underlined]] Squalodon protervus Calvert Priscodel. gabbi " [[Ditto for: Calvert]] * " [[Ditto for: Priscodel.]] ruschenbergeri " [[Ditto for: Calvert]] " [[Ditto for: Priscodel.]] lacertosus " [[Ditto for: Calvert]] Ixacanthus couradi " [[Ditto for: Calvert]] " [[Ditto for: Ixacanthus]] stenus " [[Ditto for: Calvert]] " [[Ditto for: Ixacanthus]] spiriosus " [[Ditto for: Calvert]] " [[Ditto for: Ixacanthus]] atropuis " [[Ditto for: Calvert]] " [[Ditto for: Ixacanthus]] coelospondylus " [[Ditto for: Calvert]] Zarachis flagellator " [[Ditto for: Calvert]] Cetoplus heteroclitus " [[Ditto for: Calvert]] Rhaboosteus latiradix " [[Ditto for: Calvert]] Delphinodon mento " [[Ditto for: Calvert]] " [[Ditto for: Delphinodon]] leidyi " [[Ditto for: Calvert]] Orycterocetus crocodilinus " [[Ditto for: Calvert]] Cetotherium cephalum " [[Ditto for: Calvert]] Siphonocetus priscus " [[Ditto for: Calvert]]
Geog. 2 [[underlined]] Mouth of Patuxent River [[/underlined]] [[insertion]] ^ (See Drum Pt) [[/insertion]] Priscodelphinus lacertosus St. Mary " [[Ditto for: Priscodelphinus]] uraeus " [[Ditto for: St. Mary]] Siphonocetus expansus " [[Ditto for: St. Mary]] ? [[boxed]] [[underlined]] 3/4 Mile North of Governor's Run [[/underlined]] Calvert Cliffs Priscodelphinus crassangulum Calvert [[underlined]] 1/4 Mile South of Chesapeake Beach [[/underlined]] Priscodelphinus grandaevus Calvert [[underlined]] Calvert Cliffs [[/underlined]] Lophocetus calvertensis Calvert (or Choptank) [[/boxed]] [[underlined]] Drum Point [[/underlined]] (Mouth of Patuxent) Hypocetus mediattanticus St. Mary [[line across page]] [[underlined]] near the Mouth of the Potomac R. [[/underlined]] Metopocetus durinasus St. Mary
Geog. 3 [[line]] [[underline]] Maryland, probably Maryland, or Md or Va. [[/underline]] Cephalotropis coronatus Ches. Group Prob. Md Ulias moratus " [[Ditto for: Ches.]] " [[Ditto for: Group]] Md or Va Tretulias buccatus " [[Ditto for: Ches.]] " [[Ditto for: Group]] " " [[Dittos for: Md or Va]] Balaenoptera sursiplana " [[Ditto for: Ches.]] " [[Ditto for: Group]] " " [[Dittos for: Md or Va]] Balaena affinis Owen " [[Ditto for: Ches.]] " [[Ditto for: Group]] Md Cetacean (?) " [[Ditto for: Ches.]] " [[Ditto for: Group]] " [[Ditto for: Md]] [[line]] [[underline]] Cove Point * [[/underline]] Cetotherium megalophysum St. Mary [[line]] [[underline]] Nomini, Va [[/underline]] Siphonecetus expansus St. Mary [[line]] [[underline]] Chesapeake Bay, near Pt. - no.- Pt. [[/underline]] Siphonocetus clarkianus St. Mary [[line]] * [[underline]] [[Sutte?]] [[/underline]] Cove Pt. is at South end of Calvert Co. [[end page]]
[[double underlined]] Maryland Miocene [[/double underlined]] [[underlined]] Systematic [[/underlined]] * Type - loc. [[line]] [[table]] [[table headings]] [[underlined]] Species Formation Locality [[/underlined]] [[/table headings]] [[transcribed in this order - species/formation/locality]] Squalodon proterous Calvert Chas. Co. near Pax. R. * Priscodel. gabbi " [[ditto for: Calvert]] "* [[ditto for: Chas. Co. near Pax. R.*]] " [[ditto for: Priscodel.]] ruscheubergeri " [[ditto for: Calvert]] "* [[ditto for: Chas. Co. near Pax. R.*]] " [[ditto for: Priscodel.]] lacertasus St. Mary Calvert Mouth of Patuxent R Chas. Co., near "*" [[ditto for: [[Pax. R.?]]]] " [[ditto for: Priscodel.]] crassangulum Calvert 3/4 M. N. of Governor's Run " [[ditto for: Priscodel.]] uraeus St. Mary Mouth of Pax. R " [[ditto for: Priscodel.]] grandaeuvus Calvert 1/4 M S. Ches. Beach Ixacanthus conradi " [[ditto for: Calvert]] Chas. Co. near Pax. R. " [[ditto for: Ixacanthus]] sternus " [[ditto for: Calvert]] " " "* [[ditto for: Chas. Co. near Pax. R.]] " [[ditto for: Ixacanthus]] spinosus " [[ditto for: Calvert]] " " "* [[ditto for: Chas. Co. near Pax. R.]] " [[ditto for: Ixacanthus]] atropuis " [[ditto for: Calvert]] " " "* [[ditto for: Chas. Co. near Pax. R.]] " [[ditto for: Ixacanthus]] coelosporidylus " [[ditto for: Calvert]] " " "* [[ditto for: Chas. Co. near Pax. R.]] Zarhaclus flagellator " [[ditto for: Calvert]] " " "* [[ditto for: Chas. Co. near Pax. R.]] Cetoplus heteroclitus " [[ditto for: Calvert]] " " "* [[ditto for: Chas. Co. near Pax. R.]] Rhabdosteus tatiradux " [[ditto for: Calvert]] " " "* [[ditto for: Chas. Co. near Pax. R.]] Lophocetus cluvertensis " [[ditto for: Calvert]] (or Choptank) Calvert cliffs * Delphinodon mento " [[ditto for: Calvert]] Chas. Co. near Pax. R " [[ditto for: Delphinodon]] leidyi " [[ditto for: Calvert]] " " " [[ditto for: Chas. Co. near Pax. R]] Hypocetus mediatlauteus St. Mary. Drum Pt.
Syst. 2 Orycterocetus crocodilinus Calvert. Chas. Co. near Pax R. [[underline]] Balaenidae [[/underline]] Metopocetus durinasus St. Mary. Near mouth Pot. R. Cephalotropis coronatus Chesapeake Group. Probably Md Cetotherium megalophysum St. Mary Cove Pt. " [[Ditto for: Cetotherium]] cephalum Calvert Chas. Co near Pax R.* Siphonocetus expansus St. Mary? {Mouth Pax. R, Nomini* " [[Ditto for: Siphonocetus]] priscus Calvert Chas. Co near Pax R. " [[Ditto for: Siphonocetus]] clarkianus St. Mary {Chas. B. near P.t - no -Pt.; dredged - Ulias moratus Chas. Group Md or Va Tretulias buccatus " " [[Ditto for: Chas. Group]] " " " [[Dittos for: Md or Va]] Balaenoptera sursiplana " " [[Ditto for: Chas. Group]] " " " [[Dittos for: Md or Va]] Balaena affinis Owen " " [[Ditto for: Chas. Group]] Md. Cetacean (?) " " [[Ditto for: Chas. Group]] " [[Ditto for: Md.]]
C [[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM. [[line]] [[/preprinted]] Dr True I have just come from the Survey and while there was told by a girl who goes into the Nomini Creek region on her vacations that parties were [[underlined]] said [[/underlined]] to be mining fertilizer in that vicinity, and finding lots of big bones. This to whet your appetite. Oct 4 [[GFM?]]
[[underline]] Fossil Cetaceans [[/underline]] C. [[underline]] Nomini Cliffs - Mt. Airy. R [[/underline]] [[underline]] Nov. 4, 1905. [[/underline]] Called up the [[underline]] Piedmont - Mt. Airy Guano Co., Baltimore, Md. [[/underline]] by telephone - was told that they had been digging marl out at Mt. Airy Farm down the river, near Nomini, but were doing nothing now. Indeed, the gentleman talking said he did not think [[underline]] anyone [[/underline]] was digging there now. He said I could not land at Mt. Airy, but must go to Currioman - thought the Randall Line landed there - Said he had stayed with a Mr. Frank Baker who lives on the Mt. Airy Farm, & thought I could too. Referred me to a Mr. H. M. Wagner, wholesale grocer in Wash[[superscript]] [[underline]] n [[/underline]] [[/superscript]], who belonged to the Company - I understood that Mr. Wagner had been down to Mt. Airy recently - Also mentioned a Mr. Bohannon of Wash[[superscript]] [[underline]] n [[/underline]] [[/superscript]].
*Expédié par M ^[[Cassinacin]] Dem[[superscript]] t [[/superscript]] à ^[[ [[Euphinlebains?]] ]] R [[overwritten]] ue [[/overwritten]] ^[[ oute de l' Leu]] N[[superscript]] o [[/superscript]] ^[[163]] *L'inscription du nom et de l'adresse de l'expéditeur est facultative. [[line]] [[image - postage "Republique Française" "10¢" "Postes"]] [[Franked - "Montmorency Seine Etoise" 1 - 8 10]] REPUBLIQUE FRANÇAISE [[line]] CARTE POSTALE Ce côté est exclusivement réservé à l'adresse. M [[four lines]] ^[[Fred. W. True Cur. in charge U.S. national Museum Washington D.C. Etats Unis]]
1/VIII/10 Cher monsieur Je vais serai obligé de m'envoyer un tirage à part de votre note intitulée: [[underlined]] Remarks on the fossil Cetacean, Rhabdosteus latiradix [[/underlined]] [[afui?]] qu'elle [[p[[?]]e]] être analysé dans a "Revue critique de Paléozoologie" Avec mes compliments M. Cossmann Directeur de la Revue Critique 163 Route de St-Leu Enghien-les-Bains S. et Oise Sent Aug. 27. 10 L.S.
[[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM. [[line]] [[/preprinted]] David W. Downey Agent, Md., Del. & Va, Railway Co. Piers 2, 8 & 9 Ligler St. Wharf. Baltimore Md
^[[[[underlined]] Fossil Whales [[/underlined]]]] [[red stamp]] Curator in Charge | NOV 13 1893 [[/red stamp]] ^[[Mr True]] [[preprinted]] [[image - newspaper building, with words "Established 1803"]] [[image - decorative logo with words "The Leading Newspaper of the South"]] The News and Courier No. 19 Broad St Charleston, S.C. [[/preprinted]] Nov. 10. 1893. [[preprinted]] 189 [[/preprinted]] [[red stamp]] Curator in Charge | NOV 15 1893 [[/red stamp]] Mr. Frederick W. True, Washington, D. C. My Dear Frederick: I wrote to Mr. Roche as I promised in regard to the South Carolina display of Fossils at the World's Fair, and have just received the enclosed letter which will explain itself. The Exhibit of Fossils belongs to the State, and if the National Museum wishes to secure it, you will have to write to Governor Tillman at Columbia. Please remember me to all your family, and believe me, Yours sincerely, [[J C [[underlined]] Humphrie [[/underlined]]]] [[watermark]] Bankers Linen [[/watermark]]
[[preprinted]] [[image - A globe resting on clouds]] OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, World's Columbian Commission. Administration Building, EXPOSITION GROUNDS. Chicago, Ill. U.S.A. [[/preprinted]] [[typed on line]] Nov. 1, 1893 [[/on line]] J. C. Hemphill, Esq., Charleston, S. C. Dear Mr. Hemphill: Your favor reached me in due time, and would have been replied to before but for the great pressure of business in closing up here. I am sorry sickness prevented me from seeing so little of you when you were here. The fossils in the collection in the Mining Building, belonging to the State, have been ordered sent from here to the Augusta Exposition. I don't think that Mass' Ben would allow them to go to Washington; if it was in my power I would gladly comply with your request. Hoping to see you soon, I remain, Yours truly, ^[[E L Roche]]
DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE WORLD'S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION George R. Davis of Illinois THE WORLD'S COLUMBIAN COMMISSION. President, Thomas W. Palmer, of Michigan 1st VICE-PRES. THOMAS M. WALLER, of CONNECTICUT. 2D VICE-PRES., M.H. de YOUNG of CALIFORNIA 3D VICE-PRES., DAVIDSON B. PENN, of LOUISIANA. 4th VICE-PRES., GORTON W. ALLEN, of NEW YORK. 5th VICE-PRES., ALEXANDER B. ANDREWS, of NORTH CAROLINA. SECRETARY, JOHN T. DICKINSON, of TEXAS. VICE-CHAIRMAN EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, H.P. PLATT, of OHIO. COMMISSIONERS AT LARGE. COMMISSIONERS. Augustus G. Bullock, Worcester, Mass. Gorton W. Allen, Auburn, N.Y. Peter A.B. Widener, Philadelphia, Pa. Thomas W. Palmer, Detroit, Mich. ALTERNATES. [[to Commissioners, above]] Henry Ingalls, Wiscasset, Me. Louis Fitzgerald, New York, N.Y. John W. Chalfant, Pittsburgh, Pa. James Oliver, South Bend, Ind. COMMISSIONERS. R. W. Furnas. Brownville, Neb. Patrick Walsh, Augusta, Ga. Henry Exall, Dallas, Tex. Mark L. McDonald, Santa Rosa, Cal. ALTERNATES. [[to Commissioners, above]] Hale G. Parker, St. Louis, Mo. John B. Castleman, Louisville, Ky. H.C. King, San Antonio, Tex. Thomas Burke, Seattle, Wash. COMMISSIONERS OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. COMMISSIONERS. Alexander T. Britton, Washington. Albert A. Wilson, Washington. ALTERNATES. [[to Commissioners, above]] E. Kurtz Johnson, Washington. Dorsey Clagett, Washington. COMMISSIONERS OF THE STATES. ALABAMA. COMMISSIONERS. Frederick G. Bromberg, Mobile. Oscar R. Hundley, Huntsville. ALTERNATES. [[to Commissioners, above]] Gotthold L. Werth, Montgomery. William S. Hull, Sheffield. ARKANSAS. [[commissioners]] J.T.W. Tillar, LIttle Rock. J.H. Clendenning, Fort Smith. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] James T. Mitchell, Little Rock. Thomas H. Leslie, Stuttgart. [[/alternates]] CALIFORNIA. [[commissioners]] Michel H. de Young, San Franscisco. William Forsyth, Fresno. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] George Hazleton, San Francisco. Russ D. Stephens, Sacramento. [[/alternates]] COLORADO [[commissioners]] Roswell E. Goodell, Leadville. J.H. Smith, Denver [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Henry B. Gillespie, Aspen. O.C. French, New Windsor. [[/alternates]] CONNECTICUT. [[commissioners]] Leverett Brainard, Hartford. Thomas M. Waller, New London.[[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Charles F. Brooker, Torrington. Charles R. Baldwin, Waterbury. [[/alternates]] DELAWARE. [[commissioners]] George V. Massey, Dover. Willard Hall Porter, Wilmington. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Charles F. Richards, Georgetown. William Saulsbury, Dover.[[/alternates]] FLORIDA. [[commissioners]] C.F.A. Bielby, De Land. Richard Turnbull, Monticello. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Dudley W. Adams, Tangerine. Jesse T. Bernard, Tallahassee. [[/alternates]] GEORGIA. [[commissioners]] Lafayette McLaws, Savannah. Charlton H. Way, Savannah. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] C.C. Sanders, Gainesville. John W. Clark, Augusta. [[/alternates]] IDAHO. [[commissioners]] George A. Manning, Post Falls. John E. Stearns, Nampa. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] A. J. Crook, Hailey. John M. Burke, Wardner. [[/alternates]] ILLINOIS. [[commissioners]] Charles H. Deere, Moline. Adlai T. Ewing, Chicago.[[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] La Fayette Funk, Shirley. De Witt Smith, Springfield. [[/alternates]] INDIANA. [[commissioners]] Thomas E. Garvin, Evansville. Elijah B. Martindale, Indianapolis. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] William E. McLean, Terre Haute. Charles M. Travis, Crawfordsville.[[/alternates]] IOWA. [[commissioners]] Joseph Eiboeck, Des Moines. William F. King, Mt. Vernon. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Chas. N. Whiting, Whiting. John Hayes, Red Oak.[[/alternates]] KANSAS. [[commissioners]] Charles K. Holliday, Jr., Topeka. J. R. Burton, Abilene.[[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] M.D. Henry, Independence. S.H. Lanyon, Pittsburg.[[/alternates]] KENTUCKY. [[commissioners]] John Bennett, Richmond. Harvey Myers, Covington.[[/commissioners]] [[alternates to commissioners, above]] David N. Comingore, Covington. John S. Morris, Louisville. [[/alternates]] LOUISIANA. [[commissioners]] Davidson B. Penn, Newellton. Thomas J. Woodward, New Orleans. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Alphonse Le Duc, New Orleans. P.J. McMahon, Tangipahoa. [[/alternates]] MAINE. [[commissioners]] Augustus R. Bixby, Skowhegan. William G. Davis, Portland. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] James A. Boardman, Bangor. Clark S. Edwards, Bethel.[[/alternates]] MARYLAND. [[commissioners]] James Hodges, Baltimore. Lloyd Lowndes, Cumberland. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] George M. Upshur, Snow Hill. Daniel E. Conkling, Baltimore. [[/alternates]] MASSACHUSETTS. [[commissioners]] Francis W. Breed, Lynn. Thomas E. Proctor, Boston.[[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] George P. Ladd, Spencer. Chas. E. Adams, Lowell. [[/alternates]] MICHIGAN. [[commissioners]] M. Henry Lane, Kalamazoo. Geo. H. Barbour, Detroit.[[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Ernest B. Fisher, Grand Rapids. Lyman D. Norris, Grand Rapids. [[/alternates]] MINNESOTA. [[commissioners]] H. B. Moore, Duluth. Orson V. Tousley, Minneapolis.[[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Thomas C. Kurtz, Moorhead. Muret N. Leland, Wells. [[/alternates]] MISSISSIPPI. [[commissioners]] Joseph M. Bynum, Rienzi. Robert L. Saunders, Jackson. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Fred W. Collins, Summit. Joseph H. Brinker, West Point. [[/alternates]] MISSOURI. [[commissioners]] Thomas B. Bullene, Kansas City. Charles H. Jones, St. Louis. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] O.H. Picher, Joplin. R.L. McDonald, St. Joseph. [[/alternates]] MONTANA. COMMISSIONERS. Lewis H. Hershfield, Helena. Armistead H. Mitchell, Deer Lodge C'y. ALTERNATES. Benjamin F. White, Dillon. Timothy E. Collins, Great Falls. [[commissioners]] Euclid Martin, Omaha. Albert G. Scott, Kearney. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] William L. May, Omaha. John Lauterbach, Fairbury. [[/alternates]] NEVADA. [[commissioners]] James W. Haines, Genoa. George Russell, Elko. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Enoch Strother, Virginia City. Richard Ryland, Reno.[[/alternates]] NEW HAMPSHIRE. [[commissioners]] Walter Aiken, Franklin. Charles D. McDuffie, Manchester. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] George VanDyke, Lancaster. Frank E. Kaley, Milford. [[/alternates]] NEW JERSEY. [[commissioners]] William J. Sewell, Camden. Thomas Smith, Newark. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Frederick S. Fish, Newark. Edwin A. Stevens, Hoboken.[[/alternates]] NEW YORK [[commissioners]] Chauncey M. Depew, New York. John Boyd Thacher, Albany. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] James H. Breslin, New York. James Roosevelt, Hyde Park. [[/alternates]] NORTH CAROLINA. [[commissioners]] Alexander B. Andrews, Raleigh. Thomas B. Keogh, Greensboro. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] H.C. Carter, Fairfield. G.A. Bingham, Salisbury. [[/alternates]] NORTH DAKOTA. [[commissioners]] H.P. Rucker, Grand Forks. Martin Ryan, Fargo. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Charles H. Stanley, Steele. Peter Cameron, Tyner. [[/alternates]] OHIO. [[commissioners]] Harvey P. Platt, Toledo. William Ritchie, Hamilton. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Lucius C. Cron, Piqua. Adolph Pluenier, Cincinnati. [[/alternates]] OREGON. [[commissioners]] Henry Klippel, Jacksonville. Martin Wilkins, Eugene City. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] J. L. Morrow, Heppner. W.T. Wright, Union. [[/alternates]] PENNSYLVANIA. [[commissioners]] R.B. Ricketts, Wilkesbarre. John W. Woodside, Philadelphia. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Geo. A Macbeth, Pittsburgh. John K. Hallock, Erie. [[/alternates]] RHODE ISLAND. [[commissioners]] Lyman B. Goff, Pawtucket. Gardiner C. Sims, Providence. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Jeffrey Hazard, Providence. Lorillard Spencer, Newport. [[/alternates]] SOUTH CAROLINA. [[commissioners]] A.P. Butler, Columbia. John R. Cochran, Walhalla. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] E.L. Roche, Charleston. J.M. Tindal, Sumter.[[/alternates]] SOUTH DAKOTA. [[commissioners]] Merritt H. Day, Rapid City. William McIntyre, Watertown. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] S.A. Ramsey, Woonsocket. L.S. Bullard, Pierre.[[/alternates]] TENNESSEE. [[commissioners]] Lewis T. Baxter, Nashville. Thomas L. Williams, Knoxville. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Rush Strong, Knoxville. A.B. Hurt, Chattanooga. [[/alternates]] TEXAS. [[commissioners]] Archelaus M. Cochran, Dallas. John T. Dickinson, Austin. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Lock McDaniel, Anderson. Henry B. Andrews, San Antonio. [[/alternates]] VERMONT. [[commissioners]] Henry H. McIntyre, West Randolph. Bradley B. Smalley, Burlington. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Aldace F. Walker, Rutland. A.J. Sibley, Montpelier. [[/alternates]] VIRGINIA. [[commissioners]] Virginius D. Groner, Norfolk. John T. Harris, Harrisonburg. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Charles A. Heermans, Christiansburg. Alexander McDonald, Lynchburg. [[/alternates]] WASHINGTON. [[commissioners]] Henry Drum, Tacoma. Charles B. Hopkins, Spokane Falls. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Geo. F. Cummin, Cheney. Clarence B. Bagley, Seattle. [[/alternates]] WEST VIRGINIA. [[commissioners]] James D. Butt, Harper's Ferry. J.W. St. Clair, Fayetteville. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] John Corcoran, Wheeling. Wellington Vrooman, Parkersburg. [[/alternates]] WISCONSIN. [[commissioners]] Philip Allen, Jr., Mineral Point. John N. Coburn, West Salem. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] David W. Curtis, Fort Atkinson. Myron Reed, Superior.[[/alternates]] WYOMING. [[commissioners]] Asahel C. Beckwith, Evanston. Henry G. Hay, Cheyenne. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Asa S. Mercer, Cheyenne. John J. McCormick, Sheridan. [[/alternates]] COMMISSIONERS OF THE TERRITORIES. ARIZONA. [[commissioners]] George F. Coats, Phoenix. Geo. C. Waddell, Prescott. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] W.L. Van Horn, Flagstaff. Herbert H. Logan, Phoenix. [[/alternates]] NEW MEXICO. [[commissioners]] Thomas C. Gutierres, Albuquerque. John M. Webster, Hillsborough. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Louis C. Tetard, East Las Vegas. Charles B. Eddy, Eddy.[[/alternates]] OKLAHOMA. [[commissioners]] Othniel Beeson, Reno City. Frank R. Gammon, Guthrie. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] John Wallace, Oklahoma City. Joseph W. McNeal, Guthrie.[[/alternates]] UTAH. [[commissioners]] Frederick J. Kiesel, Ogden. Patrick H. Lannan, Salt Lake City. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] William M. Ferry, Park City. Charles Crane, Kanosh.[[/alternates]] ALASKA. [[commissioners]] Edward de Groff, Sitka. Louis L. Williams, Juneau. [[/commissioners]] [[alternates]] Carl Spuhn, Killisnoo. N. A. Fuller, Juneau. [[/alternates]]
[[preprinted]] Mr. Frederick W. True. [[/preprinted]] Marr Brown Hille Marlboro Penn. Junctn. Pindell Lyons Cr. Chaney Owings Mt Harmony [[boxed]] Washn x Berry Ritchie [[/boxed]]
There is an interesting-looking greenish bank on North side of the track just before reaching [[underlined]] Brown station [[/underlined]]. Better stop there some time - Get off at Brown. There is another just beyond [[Mailtino?]]
^[[Collections]] [[preprinted]] College of Charleston Museum PAUL M. REA, CURATOR CHARLESTON, S. C., [[/preprinted]] March 7, 1906. Dr. F.W.True, U.S. National Museum, Washington, D.C. My dear Sir: The collection of S. C. phosphate fossils in this Museum includes a number of ribs of the manatee and whale, fragments of the skull of the manatee, earbones of whales, an interesting vesical calculus, about a half dozen snouts of Xiphoid whales, fragments of Mastodon bones, etc. besides a considerable number of fine shark teeth of various species. My de[[strikethrough]] a [[/strikethrough]]lay in replying to your letter of Feb. 17th has been due to my endeavor to learn the fate of the Centennial exhibit about which you inquire. I have asked a number of people, including the gentleman who was at that time president of the Wando Mining Co. but no one has any memory of the fate of the collections after the Exhibition. They seem to think that the specimens were scattered. If I can assist you in any way I shall be glad if you will command me. Very truly yours, ^[[P.M. Rea.]]
[[insertion]] Sent Oct 1/09 [[/insertion]] 17/[[11?]] Cher monsieur, Je vais [[seeai?]] [[cecamamant?]] de allai bien m'envoyer un exemplairè de votre [[Méucare?]]: «The fossil Cetacean [[underlined]] Dorudon serratus [[/underlined]] Gibbes » afin que l'analyse [[?]] sait faite dans ma «Revue critique de Paléo-Zoologie» Le [[[[m?]][[?]]éro]] [[cuellant?]] l'analyse vous sera ensuite envoyé - avec [[alle?]] [[rem[[?]][[ciem?]]ents]] anticipés M. Cossmann Directeur de la Revue critique Paris 95 rue de Maubeuge
* Expédié par M. ^[[Cossmann]] Dem[[superscript]] t [[/superscript]] a ^[[Paris]] Rue ^[[d Maubeuge]] No ^[[95]] * L'inscription du nom et de l'adresse de le'expéditeur est facultative. [[line]] RÉPUBLIQUE FRANÇAISE [[line]] CARTE POSTALE Ce côté exclusivement réservé à l'adresse. [[image - post stamp "Republique Francaise" "10¢" "Postes" written on it, with an image of a lady]] [[Franked - 2 and 1/4 times "Paris" R. Dufaubgs Dents" "26"]] M [[four lines]] ^[[Fred. W. True Curator in U. S. Nat. Museum Washington D.C. Etats Unis
LIBRARY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Berkeley, California, [[purple stamp]] APR 26 1907 [[/purple stamp]] Permit me to express the thanks of the University for your gift of ^[[your article entitled "Remarks on the type of the fossil cetacean agorophius pygmaeus (Müller)]] Very respectfully yours, JOSEPH C. ROWELL, Librarian. ^[[A.R.]]
[[image - postal mark from Berkeley (APR 26 1907) and Washington DC (MAY 1 1907)]] [[preprinted]] [[image - Eagle surrounded by words "United States of America]] [[image - Image of President McKinley surrounded by words "Postage One Cent 1843-McKinley-1901"]] THE SPACE ABOVE IS RESERVED FOR POSTMARK. POSTAL CARD. THE SPACE BELOW IS FOR THE ADDRESS ONLY. [[/preprinted]] Mr. Frederick W. True, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
University of Chicago, Chicago, August 31, 1909. My dear Mr. True: I desire to express my appreciation of your kindness in sending me a copy of your paper on "A New Genus of Fossil Cetaceans from Santa Cruz Territory, Patagonia; and Description of a Mandible and Vertebrae of Prosqualodon." Very truly yours, [[signature?]] Mr. F. W. True, Head Curator of Biology, U. S. National Museum, Washington, D. C.
Mr. Wm. Palmer, U. S. National Museum, Dear Sir:- I am authorized by the Administrative Assistant to request you to proceed to Chesapeake Beach and Plum Point, Maryland, on or about Oct. 7, 1908, for the purpose of continuing the work of collecting fossil cetaceans for the National Museum. It is understood that this work of collecting fossil cetaceans will occupy about one week, after which you will return to Washington and resume your regular duties. You will be reimbursed for your traveling and incidental expenses not to exceed $15.00 on presentation of an itemized account, accompanied by the usual subvouchers. Yours respectfully, Head Curator of Biology.
[[insertion]] Coll [[/insertion]] [[preprinted]] [[image - blue header: W.S. JENKS FURNACES, RANGES AND LATROBES. STOVE REPAIRS. GAS AND GASOLINE STOVES. 717 SEVENTH STREET N.W.]] [[Image - printed of oven range and of the White House.]] [[caption]] THIS RANGE INSTALLED BY US IN THE WHITE HOUSE [[/caption]]] [[/preprinted]] [[preprinted]] [[strikethrough]] WASHINGTON, D.C. [[/preprinted]] [[/strikethrough]] Auburndale March 13 [[preprinted]] 190 [[/preprinted]]9 [[insertion]] Ansd Mch[[Ref?]] [[/insertion]] Dr F. W True. Dear sir Yesterday I visited the phosphate mines. The company has purchased about eight hundred acres, and have excavated nearly 12 acres. The mining is done by hydraulic power. This is done same as placer mining [[strikethrough]] is do [[/strikethrough]] The water being forced by a powerfull pump. Through an inch and a half. nozzle. With a pressure of 175 lbs to the square inch. No one could get near where the water [[strikethrough]] w [[/strikethrough]] was tearing and forcing out great boulders of phosphate. All this [[insertion]] loose material [[/insertion]] is drawn by suction through a ten inch pipe one thousand feet to where it is cleaned and dried. The 12 [[strikethrough]] eight [[/strikethrough]] acres excavated are 12 to 15 feet
2 [[image - blue header: W.S. JENKS FURNACES, RANGES AND LATROBES. STOVE REPAIRS. GAS AND GASOLINE STOVES. 717 SEVENTH STREET N.W.]] [[Image - ovenrange with picture of the White House]] [[caption]] THIS RANGE INSTALLED BY US IN THE WHITE HOUSE [[/caption]]] [[preprinted]] [[strikethrough]] WASHINGTON, D.C. [[/strikthrough]] 190 [[/preprinted]] Deep. The first eight feet is sand. Which is dug out by a steam shovel. [[strikethrough]] is [[/strikethrough]] and placed on cars and carried away. Below this sand comes the phosphate rock. I was very fortunate in meeting the supt. He was very kind and when he learned my object took special pains to help me secure specimens- and presenting some five fossils that he had collected for himself. and gave me privilege to enter this mine and dig in the banks, whenever I so desired. I have some vertebrae, one measures about 10 inches in circumference. Ribs, leg bones, and other fossils. They crumble [[insertion]] some [[/insertion]], unless handled with care. Do you not think it should be better to pack them carefully in my trunk, then to pack them in a box, kindly let me know. I have much to tell you, regarding this mine. I am writing under difficulties. Flies. Wind. and confusion. Have quite a fine collection for you. Respectfully N R Wood. Auburndale. Fla.
Dr L.W. True Rec. Sept. 12th/08 Coll. [preprinted] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM WASHINGTON, D.C. [/preprinted] Aug 30 1908 5 P.M. Mr James E Benedict Act. Head Curator Biology, Weather was very bad for first two days and large skull was damaged by easterly storm. We have found another skull and possibly two more besides but have not had time to dig them out We have had very good success thus far and have not as yet been over new territory. I believe we have lost a skull owing to a land-slide We have found several odd jaws and parts that will all come in usefull We may have to stay longer than first intended owing to the number and quantity of things found
[[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM WASHINGTON, D.C. [[/preprinted]] Palmer has been all right so far. Owing to storm we had to take out large skull in three sections The first two nights the wind was so high and the rain so heavy we had to sleep on the floor of an old negro cabin the fleas and bed bugs were some-thing terrible I did not write sooner as we were so busy from daylight till dark. Please excuse writing as circumstances are not favorable Respectfully D B Mackie Plum Point Calvert Co. Md.
[[preprinted]] Johns Hopkins University [[image: Seal surrounded by words "The Johns Hopkins University Baltimore 1876"]] Baltimore, Md., U. S. A. GEOLOGICAL LABORATORY. WM. BULLOCK CLARK, DIRECTOR AND PROFESSOR OF GEOLOGY. HARRY FIELDING REID, PROFESSOR OF GEOLOGICAL PHYSICS. EDWARD B. MATHEWS, PROFESSOR OF MINERALOGY AND PETROGRAPHY. CHARLES K. SWARTZ, ASSOCIATE IN GEOLOGY AND PALEONTOLOGY. EDWARD W. BERRY, ASSISTANT IN PALEONTOLOGY. OFFICES OF MARYLAND GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. [[/preprinted]] January 29, 1907 [[underlined]] ^[[Ans'd Jan 30.]] [[/underlined]] Dr. F. W. True, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C., Dear Sir: I shall be very glad to place all of Professor Cope's types of fossil Cetaceans in our University collection at your disposal any time you care to come here. We have some other materials secured by later collectors that you may also be glad to see. It will give me much pleasure to put it all at your disposal. Believe me, Very truly yours, ^[[Wm. B. Clark]]
[[underlined]] Popes Creek [[Cr.?]] [[/underlined]] Sothaer 2.30. 4 00 PM Cox Port Isbacco La Plata Waldorf - Brandwine Cheltenham Mailboro Mulliken Boerie Waskylan [[underlined]] av [/uderlined]] 5.00 6-22
Dr. F. W. True. Edw. J. Brown, late of Lemon City, Fla., & formerly of Washington, is doing volunteer work in Div. of Birds - Finishing the task started by Mr. Wilson. C.W.R. He began work May 28. 08 [[line]]
Mr. Harley Morse Lakeland Fla. Polk Co. [[line]] [[strikethrough]] Has [[/strikethrough]] Phosphate works near by - Get fossils [[line]]
Lve. Balto. Pier 8. Sight St. Wed. & Fri. at 6.30 AM. for Benedict & Fair Haven, Plum Pt., Dare's, Gov. Run, Cove Pt., Millstone, Solomoriss Id., Spencers, St. Leonard, Sollers, Sotterley, Jones, Parkers, Forrests, Williams, Dukes, Freut Hall, Holland Pt. & Benedict. [[underlined]] Ret. [[/underlined]] - leave Benedict Thurs. & Sat. at 5.30 A.M. Sotterley 8 AM, Millstone 10.00 AM, Gov. Run 12.00 noon, Plum Pt. 1.00 PM, Fair Haven 2.00 PM. Balto. 7 PM. Also leave Balto. Sunday
at 7.00 PM. for Millstone Solomons, Spenchs, St Leonards, Sollerteys. Forrests Dukes, Holland Pt. Benedict, Leitchs & pts to Lyons Cr. [[underlined]] Ret. [[/underlined]] leave Lyons Cr. [[insertion]] ^ for Balto [[/insertion]] Mon. at 10.00 AM, [[strikethrough]] for [[/strikethrough]] Lower Mailboro 12.00 noon. Benedict 2.00 PM, Sotterley 5.00 PM, Millstone 8.00 PM. Calling at all wharves below Leitchs when signalled (except Williams & Jones) from wharves on the river for passengers.
BOATS FOR HIRE. [[line]] Sailing parties for WAKEFIELD, STRATTSFORD CLIFFS, BLACKSTON ISLAND, COLTON'S ISLAND, And Other Points. ....HARRY B. MILLER.... Inquire "Shermans Store," and Sail Boat "[[strikethrough]] Ruth. [[/strikethrough]]" ^[[Starlight.]]
BOATS FOR HIRE. [[line]] Sailing parties for WAKEFIELD, STRATTSFORD CLIFFS, BLACKSTON ISLAND, COLTON'S ISLAND, And Other Points. ....HARRY B. MILLER.... Inquire "Shermans Store," and Sail Boat "[[strikethrough]] Ruth. [[/strikethrough]]" ^[[Starlight.]]
Coll. Plum Point. Md. Sept. 1 - 08 Dear Dr. Benedict We have had rather bad weather. Got Mackie's skull out and it was very fragile and went into pieces with the tide working up on us. Got the two lower jaws out of the hole where I though my skull might be but got the front part of it and a porpoise skull and some [[ziles ?]] so that my bone hole yelded pretty well. I suppose the whales skull is in there but further back and it would be a big job to get at it. We have a number of jaws and another skull and a lot of other
[[blank page]] [[end page]] [[start page]] bones. Having lost so much time we cannot get to Governors run as it would be too much for one day trip and be a very long walk back. The two skulls we have are Inia like and worth the whole trip. We shall get back Friday night and hope be on hand Saturday Yours truly Wm Palmer P.S. Boos is a good camper and is O.K. W.P.
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1. [[underline]] Delphinapterus vermontanus [[/underline]] Thpsn In 1850, Z. Thompson reported that there had been found in Charlotte township about 12 miles south of Burlington, the bones of [[left margin note]] [Spec. 1.] [[/left margin note]] a fossil porpoise, comprising a line of vertebrae [[underline]] plus [[/underline]] 13, sternum, ribs, greater part of the head, 9 teeth, [[insertion]] ^ hyoid, [[/insertion]] bones of one forearm, several chevrons - He compared the bones with the figures of [[underline]] Delphinus leucas, [[/underline]] the Beluga, in Cuvier's [[underline]] Os. foss. [[/underline]] and concluded they belonged to the same genus [[strikethrough]] but to a separate [[/strikethrough]] and "to La cépede's subgenus [[underline]] Delphinapterus, [[/underline]] but a separate species, which he named [[underline]] Delphinus Vermontanus [[/underline]] - Prof. Agassiz also thought they were allied to [[underline]] D. leucas. [[/underline]] [[left margin note]] [Spec 1.] [[/left margin note]] In 1853, Thompson in App. to Hist. of Vt., p. 15, redescribed the bones under the name [[underline]] "Beluga vermontana. [[/underline]] - Thompson" - He here employs the name [[underline]] Beluga leucas [[/underline]] [[strikethrough]] in quot [[/strikethrough]] in referring to Cuvier's [[underline]] Os. foss. [[/underline]], instead of [[underline]] Delphinus leucas [[/underline]] He adds that he has had an opportunity to compare 3 heads of [[underline]] B. leucas [[/underline]] in the Hunterian Mus., London, and an entire skeleton in Agassiz's coll. at Cambridge, Mass. He repeats the figures originally published in 1850.
2 [[left margin]] [[line]] Spec. 1. [[line]] [[/margin]] In 1861, in a Report on the Geology of Vt., vol. 1, C. H. Hitchcock copied Thompson's description, and added that the skeleton was then in the State House at Montpelier, with Thompson's coll. "The separate bones [[underline]] have [[/underline]] been wired together, and many of the missing bones [[strikethrough]] parts [[/strikethrough]] have been supplied by models in wood. The work of restoration and fitting the bones together in, as far as possible, their natural position, was performed by Edward Hitchcock jr who exhibited the skeleton with AAAS. at its Springfield Meeting. He quotes Hitchcock's remarks, which include a detailed statement of the condition of the bones, etc. [[left margin]] [[line]] Spec. 1. [[line]] [[/left margin]] From this it appears that the [[strikethrough]] C [[/strikethrough]] skull was badly broken, that 9 teeth were found and were worn showing the animal to be adult; there were 41 vertebrae found, nearly all the chevrons, 5 ribs perfect & fragments of others, perfect sternum, 15 inches "in its largest diameter", larger part of the left fin as far as the carpus. Animal was about 14 ft. long. Hitchcock jr. is quoted further to the effect that "it is, without doubt, of the genus [[underline]] Beluga [[/underline]]" - [[left margin]] [[line]] Spec. 1. [[line]] [[/margin]] In the 2[[underlined superscript]] d [[/underlined superscript]] vol. of the same report A. D. Hager on p. 938, figures the skeleton
3 in a rather poor woodcut - He says that he fitted up an artificial head ("embracing the bones that had been preserved") for the skeleton while serving in the capacity of curator of the State Cabinet, in order to make it more attractive to visitors. In 1863 in Logan's Rept of the Geol. Sun. of Canada, p. 919, it is stated in the thick clay in the backyard of Messrs. Peel & Courte, [[insertion]] Montreal [[/insertion]] there were found [[line]] Spec. 2. [[line]] "several of the caudal vertebrae of a cetacean, [[underline]] Beluga Vermontana. [[/underline]] [[line]] Spec. 3 [[line]] In 1883, J. W. Dawson in underline]] Amer. J. Sci. [[/underline]] p. 201, stated that he had found detached bones of [[underline]] Beluga [[/underline]] in the Postpliocene clays of Riviere du Loup, and that [[line]] Spec. 4. [[line]] considerable portions of a skeleton on the South side of Baie des Chaleurs, in excavating for the Intercolonial RR. & described by Gilpin. [[line]] Spec. 2? [[line]] He says also that bones were found in the brick clays near Montreal, apparently referring to the statement of Logan, just cited; also [[line]] Spec. 5. [[line]] that "a specimen" was found in sand near Cornwall, Ontario. He says the last was compared with recent bones in McGill Coll. Mus. by E. Billings and concluded
4 that it belonged to the modern species, and adds: [[line]] Spec. 1 [[line]] "+ I believe extended this conclusion to Wm Thompson's specimen [[strikethrough]] " [[/strikethrough]], the distinctive characteristics of which, as stated by that naturalist seem not to exceed the individual differences in modern specimens" - [[line]] Spec. 6. [[line]] In Can. Rec. of Sci., 6, 1896, Sir Wm Dawson, in an article on a specimen of [[underline]] Beluga Catodon [[/underline]] from the Leda Clay, Montreal, (p. 351), goes over the history of Thompson's + other specimens. He says that recent bones in McGill Coll. Mus. enabled Billings to refer [[underline]] B. vermontana [[/underline]] to the recent species [[underline]] B. Catodon [[/underline]] L. He says the best fossil specimens, found in Canada, are [[line]] Spec. 2. [[line]] "one discovered in Peel's Brickyard, Montreal, [[line]] Spec. 5 [[line]] one found near Cornwall, and another [[line]] Spec. 7. [[line]] discovered at Bathurst, N.B., and described by Gilpin and Honeyman [[insertion]] ^ Same as 4, [[/insertion]]. The two former specimens, of which the first is nearly perfect, are now in the museum of the Geological Survey in Ottawa, and were noticed by the late Mr. Billings in the Proceedings of this Society," - [[line]] Spec. 6 [[line]] Sir Wm then goes on to describe a specimen found in the brick clay of
5 Messrs. Smith's backyard near Papureau Road (Montreal?)_ He says the skeleton is nearly complete. The locality is about 100 ft above the St. Lawrence R., and the specimen occurs at a depth of 22 ft in the clay, with [[underline]] Leda Telluria [[/underline]] & Foraminifera-
1863 1870 Thompson √ - [[circled]] X [[/circled]] Amer. Jour. Sci. ^[[insertion]] ^ (2) [[/insertion]] [[strikethrough]] 11 [[/strikethrough]] 9, 1850, 256 [[insertion]] ^ figs 1-13 [[/insertion]] " [[Ditto for: Thompson]] [[circled]] X [[/circled]] Hist. of Vt. 1853 [[underlined]] App [[/underlined]] [[insertion]] ^ p. [[/insertion]] 15, figs 1-13 Hitchcock, et al. [[circled]] X [[/circled]] Rept on Geol. Vt. 1861 1, & 2, 938 ? [[circled]] X [[/circled]] Geol. of Canada 1863, 919 ___ [[circle]] Can. Nat. & O.J.Sci [[insertion]] ^ V [[/insertion]] Dec. 1870, p. -- [[insertion]] ^ ___ √ [[circled]] X [[/circled]] Amer. Jour. Sci [[insertion]] (3) [[/insertion]], 25, 1883, 200 [[/insertion]] Dawson √ [[circled]] X [[/circled]] Can. Rec. Sci. 6, [[insertion]] (1894 [[/insertion]] -1895 [[insertion]] ), ^ 1896 [[/insertion]] 357 Gilpin [[circle]] Trans. Nova Scotia Inst. Nat. Hist., [[insertion]] (?) [[/insertion]] 2, 1874
Dear Sir:- Replying to your letter of Oct 15 1906, I would say that [[underlined]] Delphinapterus [[/underlined]] is now considered a distinct genus, and indeed with [[underlined]] Monodon [[/underlined]] [[insertion]] ^ (Narwhal) [[/insertion]], represents a separate subfamily of the Delphinidae. Linnaeus put all the porpoises he knew about [[insertion]][[strikethrough]] ^ - only 3 species [[/strikethrough]][[/insertion]] under his genus [[underlined]] Delphinus [[/underlined]], except [[strikethrough]] Monodon [[/strikethrough]] the Narwhal. He has only three species of [[underlined]] Delphinus [[/underlined]], viz, - [[underlined]] phicaena, delphis [[/underlined]] and [[underlined]] orca [[/underlined]] - The first is now in in the genus [[underlined]] Phocaena [[/underlined]], the second is the type species of [[underlined]] Delphinus [[/underlined]], and the third is the type species of [[underlined]] Orcinus [[/underlined]] - They now stand as [[underlined]] Phocaenes phocaenes [[/underlined]] (L.) [[underlined]] Delphinus delphis [[/underlined]] L. [[underlined]] Orcinus orca [[/underlined]] (L.) At the time Thompson wrote, all dolphins about which there was any doubt were conveniently referred to the genus [[underlined]] Delphinus [[/underlined]], just as all kinds of deer were relegated to the genus [[underlined]] Cervus [[/underlined]]. If you will look in Bull 36. USNM you
2 will find a classification of Delphinidae when is [[strikethrough]] to all intents & purpor [[/strikethrough]] substantially the one accepted at present, except that a few changes of name have ever made for reasons of priority. As regards [[underlined]] Delphinus vermontanus [[/underlined]] Thompson, it is true that he originally described the species with that name, but in the [[strikethrough]] Natural [[/strikethrough]] History of VA, 1853, Appendix, p. 15, he [[strikethrough]] used [[/strikethrough]] substituted the name [[underlined]] Beluga vermontana [[/underlined]] Thompson. [[underlined]] Beluga [[/underlined]] Rafinesque (1815) is [[preoccupivly?]] [[underlined]] Delphinapterus [[/underlined]] [[Lacipida?]] (1804). Hence the species, which [[strikethrough]] the [[/strikethrough]] certainly belongs to the latter genus, stands as [[underlined]] Del- vermontana [[/underlined]] (Thompson) - I feel considerable hesitancy in pronouncing on the validity of Thompson's species, as I have never seen the type specimen. [[strikethrough]] If [[/strikethrough]] Thompson's description and figures are far from satisfactory, though excellent for the time in which they were [[strikethrough]] written [[/strikethough]] published. If his characters are taken literally, the inference would
3 be that the species is quite distinct from [[underlined]] D. leucas [[/underlined]]. For example, the vertebral formula of [[underlined]] D. vermontana [[/underlined]] as given by Thompson is C.7, D. 13, L 12. Ca 20 = 52. The normal formula of D. leucas is C. 7, D. 11, L. 9, Ca. 23 = 50. Although all species of dolphins vary much in [[strikethrough]] their [[/strikethrough]] their formulae, there is [[strikethrough]] no prob [[/strikethrough]] such amount of variation as is shown in the his formulae cited. If it [[strikethrough]] will correct [[/strikethrough]] [[insertion]] ^ the difference notes actually existed [[/insertion]], there would be a strong probability that D. vermont was distinct. As a matter of fact, however, Thompson did not have all the vertebrae and he may or may not have been mistaken in calculating the number lost. I should want to see the specimen before forming an opinion on that point. [[strikethrough]] J. W. Dawson in Amer. Sci. 1883, p. 201, states that the Cornwall, Ontario, [[strikethrough]] specimen [[/strikethrough]] fossil specimen was compared with recent bones of D. leucas in McGill Coll. Mus., by E. Billings, and that the latter concluded that it belonged to the modern species. Dawson adds "I [[/strikethrough]]
4 [[strikethrough]] believe (Billys) extended this conclusion to Dr Thompsons specimen, the distinctive characters of which, as stated that by that Naturalist seem not to exceed the individual differences in modern specimens" - [[/strikethrough]] Although Thompson's species and [[underlined]] D. leucas [[/underlined]] appear to present differences, the fact that Billys compared the [[strikethrough]] Ontario [[/strikethrough]] Cornwall fossil with the recent [[underlined]] D. leucas [[/underlined]] and concluded that they were the same species, and [[strikethrough]] also [[/strikethrough]] that Thompson's [[strikethrough]] species [[/strikethrough]] was [[insertion]] ^ also [[/insertion]] the same species, [[strikethrough]] leads in [[/strikethrough]] makes it very probable, I think, that the [[strikethrough]] differences [[/strikethrough]] apparent differences in Thompsons description are not real - I should be very glad to examine the Packenham specimen, and [[strikethrough]] if there [[/strikethrough]] as we have a very good collection of [[underlined]] D. leucas [[/underlined]] could probably come to same conclusion about it - Sir Wm Dawson state in 1896 that the Peel's Brickyard specimen as the Cornwall specimen are in [[strikethrough]] the [[/strikethrough]] your museum, and that the former is nearly perfect - If there is a skull with either of these
5 [[strikethrough]] it might [[/strikethrough]] I should like vr much to see that also.
[[insertion]] [[Delphinapteus?]] [[/insertion]] [[circled]] 1. [[/circled]] [[preprinted]] GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA, A. P. Low, Deputy Head and Director. [[/preprinted]] Ottawa. Oct. 15, 1906 [[insertion]] Ansd Oct. 1906 [[/insertion]] To Dr. F. W. True. Dear Sir, [[left margin]] V [[/left margin]] In the Am. Journ. Sc. & Arts for March, 1850, - the late Prof. Zadock Thompson records the discovery [[left margin]] Spec. 1. [[/left margin]] of a large part of the skeleton of a small whale, which he called provisionally [[underlined]] Delphinus Vermontanus [[/underlined]], in past tertiary days about twelve miles south of Burlington, Vt., in Aug. 1849. But Prof. Thompson distinctly says that he regards [[underlined]] Delphinapterus [[/underlined]] Lacepede, as only a subgenus of [[underlined]] Delphinus [[/underlined]]. [[left margin]] V [[/left margin]] On page 919 of the Geology of Canada (1863) [[left margin]] Spec. 2 [[/left margin]] it is said that "several of the caudal vertebrae of a cetacean, [[underlined]] Beluga Vermontana [[/underlined]]" were found in the Leda clay (pleistocene) "at the brick yard of Messrs. Pool & [[strikethrough]] Compte [[/strikethrough]] Comte, at or near the Mile -end quarries, Montreal. Those vertebrae are st[[strikethrough]] l [[/strikethrough]]ill in our Museum, & were doubtless identified with [[underlined]] B. Vermontana [[/underlined]] by the late E. Billings. In vol. V of the "Canadian Naturalist & Quarterly [[insertion]] Journal of Science [/insertion]] for December, 1870, E. Billings records the discovery
[[circled]] 2 [[/circled]] of a comparatively perfect skeleton of a whale, [[left margin]] Spec. 5 [[/left margin]] which he also calls [[underlined]] Beluga Vermontana [[/underlined]], in a clay pit near Cornwall, Ont. This specimen is also in our Museum. About a month ago, we heard of the discovery of a fourth skeleton, of [[strikethrough]] [[?]] [[/strikethrough]] what proved to be a small whale, at a place called Pakenham, some 44 miles from here, in Ontario. It was found in Pleistocene clay, while digging a well, & only a portion of it, consisting of the skull, [[strikethrough]] three [[/strikethrough]] [[insertion]] ^ five [[/insertion]] of the cervical, & three of the dorsal vertebra, with several of the anterior epiphyses, was dug out. These remains, which are at present in my possession, are evidently those of a very young individual. That they are specifically the same as the Cornwall & Montreal specimens which Billings referred to [[underlined]] Beluga Vermontana [[/underlined]], & with the Burlington specimen that Thompson described as [[underlined]] Delphinus Vermontanus [[/underlined]], seems to me almost certain. But, are the [[underlined]] D. Vermontanus [[/underlined]] of Thompson, & the [[underlined]] B. Vermontana [[/underlined]] of Billings, really distinct from the common living [[underlined]] Delphinapterus leucas [[/underlined]]? Have you ever formed any opinion on this point?
[[circled]] 3. [[/circled]] & if you have, would you have any objection to telling me what it is? Referring to the Cornwall skeleton, E. Billings writes as follows: "Judging from the figures & description published in Tilliman's Journal by the late Professor Thompson, there can be little doubt that ours is the same species as the one described by him under the name [[underlined]] Beluga Vermontana [[/underlined]]." But, it seems to me that Thompson never called it [[underlined]] Beluga Vermontana [[/underlined]]. It would be possible to send you the skull & bones from Pakenham, if you would like to see them. Very truly yours, J. F. Whiteaves. (Assistant Director.)
^[[Diochotichus]] [[preprinted]] AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 77th Street and Central Park West New York [[/preprinted]] Febuary 10, 1909. ^[[Ansd Feb 16]] My dear Dr. True: We are in receipt of your favor of February 6th, and in reply would say that we shall be glad to have you describe our specimen of the fossil porpoise from Patagonia and to publish your article in our Museum Journal. If this is agreeable to you, we will have the specimen packed and shipped to you for study. Very truly yours, ^[['W. C.' Bumpus]] Director. Dr. F. W. True, Smithsonian Institution, United States National Museum, Washington, D. C.
Drochohchy [[preprinted]] AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 77TH STREET AND CENTRAL PARK WEST NEW YORK DEPARTMENT OF VERTEBRATE PALÆNTOLOGY PRF HENRY FAIRFIELD OSBORN, CURATOR DR. W. D. MATTHEW, ASSOCIATE CURATOR [[/preprinted]] Feb. 10 1909 Ansd Feb 11. Dr. F. W. True National Museum Washington D.C. My dear Sir In reply to your letter of 6th inst. to Dr. Bumpus, in regard to a skull of ?[[underlined]] Argyrocetus [[/underlined]] in this museum, Professor Osborn desires me to inquire whether it would be agreable to you to publish a short description with figures of this specimen in our Bulletin, if it is of sufficient importance to deserve a special notice, and to include it in your studies upon American fossil Cetacea. If so we will forward the specimen to your at once, and if you will send us when you are ready a memorandum of the approximate length of the description and figures desired, we can make out requisition for its publication as is our usual form. I may say further that we would be very
[[preprinted]] AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 77TH STREET AND CENTRAL PARK WEST NEW YORK DEPARTMENT OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY PROF. HENRY FAIRFIELD OSBORN, CURATOR DR. W. D. MATTHEW, ASSOCIATE CURATOR [[/preprinted]] pleased to forward to you for study any type specimens of fossil cetacea in our collection, but that so far we have not been able to find and identify more than two of three - [[underlined]] Mesocelius siphunculus, Zarhachis velox [[/underlined]], and some [[underlined]] Priscodelphinus [[/underlined]] vertebrae possibly a type. There is a small collection of Cetacea etc. from Virginia, Miocene I suppose, but no more particular labels to any of them. I have not yet been able to get around to running down this material. We have too a considerable part of the skeleton of [[underlined]] Zeuglodon [[/underlined]] in the Warren collection, but it has never been unpacked, and I do not suppose you would have any especial occasion to see it. Sincerely yours W.D. Matthew
Dorudon [[preprinted]] MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY, CAMBRIDGE, MASS. [[/preprinted]] 23 June 1908 Dear Mr. True, I have sent by Adams Express prepaid proofs of the three plates for your Bulletin Dorudon & shall be glad to have them again as soon as possible Yours truly Samuel Henshaw.
[[circled]] 1. [[/circled]] Delphinapterus [[preprinted]] GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANANDA A. P. Low, Deputy Head and Director. [[/preprinted]] Ottawa, Feb. 2 [[superscript]] nd [[/superscript]], 1907. Ans'd Feb 5/07 To Dr. F. W. True. Dear Sir, Many thanks for your letter of the 21 [[superscript]] st [[/superscript]] of October last, & for the information about the [[underlined]] Beluga Vermontana [[/underlined]], & its relations to [[underlined]] D. leucas. [[/underlined]] I have to apologize for not answering your letter sooner, but, almost immediately after writing to you, an attack of bronchitis intervened, which has confined me to the house until long after the new year. And, as I write, I feel quite worn out, or rather tired, both mentally & physically, from so much coughing. The reason why I failed to find the place where Thompson changed the name [[underlined]] Delphinus Vermontanus [[/underlined]] to [[underlined]] Beluga Vermontana [[/underlined]], is the very obvious one that we have not a copy
[[circled]] 2. [[/circled]] of his 1853 [[underlined]] "Appendix" [[/underlined]] to the History of Vermont. At the time that I wrote, I did not remember that it was issued apart from the earlier volume on the Natural History of that State. In regard to the Pakenham skeleton, a small portion [[insertion]] ^ of the skeleton [[/insertion]] (consisting of the skull, with most of the cervial, & three of the dorsal vertebrae) has been dug out, & the rest is said to be still in the ground. I offered the owner $10.00 for the portion that had actually been dug up (which is still in my possession) & $15.00 more for the part that is still in the ground, if he would dig it out & forward it. If he had accepted this offer, I had hoped to have sent you the skull, &c. , that is now lying on my table. But, unfortunately, he declines to sell either portion, at the price offered, & wants the part that I have, to be sent back at once. In the mean time, I have prepared a short note
[[circled]] 3 [[/circled]] on the discovery of this Pakenham skeleton, for publication in the Febrary No. of the "Ottawa Naturalist". It seems to me clear that all the remains of [[underlined]] Delphinapterus [[/underlined]] that have been found so far, in the Pleistocene of Vermont; the Jacquet River, N.B.; Riviere du Loup (en bas) & Montreal, P. 2.; & Cornwall & Pakenham, Ont.; are referable to one species. Billings, writing of the Cornwall specimen, refers it pretty confidently to [[underlined]] Beluga Vermontana [[/underlined]], but does not offer any opinion as to its identity (or otherwise) with the living species that we now call [[underlined]] Delphinaterus lencas [[/underlined]]. But, in his list of the vertebrate fossils of the Pleistocene of Eastern Canada (The Canadian Ice Age, 1893, p. 268) Sir J. W. Dawson distinctly says "there seems no good reason to believe that the [[underlined]] Beluga Vermontana [[/underlined]] of Thompson, from the Pleistocene of Vermont, is distinct from this species"; - i.e. [[underlined]] Delphinapterus leucas [[/underlined]], Pallas; which he quotes as a synonym of [[underlined]] Beluga catodon [[/underlined]]. Very truly yours, J. F. Whiteaves.
^[[Delphinapterus]] [[preprinted]] [[image: crest/logo]] STATE OF VERMONT OFFICE OF STATE GEOLOGIST BURLINGTON, VT. [[/preprinted]] May 25th. 1908. Dr. F. W. True, My Dear Sir: I am under much obligati[[strikethrough]] i [[/strikethrough]]^[[o]]n to you for so promptly examining the photos [[strikethrough]] [[r?]] [[/strikethrough]]^[[o]]f the bones of the Halifax whale. I shall feel much less uncertain in what I publish because of your most highly valued opinion. As to the periotic of the Halifax[[strikethrough]] t [[/strikethrough]]specimen, Mr. Andrews wrote me just before he left"As soon as I looked at the periotic of this specimen(Halifax)it seemed to me that it resembled very closely the corresponding bone of Monodon. A comparison shows that in point of size and general shape it agrees very much better with M.monoceros than with D. leucas, in fact the whole shape of the bone is decidedly unlike Delphinapterus..In order to verify my opinion I showed the specimen to Dr. W. D. Matthews and he agreed with me^[[|]]that, while there are some points of difference between th^[[e]] periotic of this specimen and M[[strikethrough]] r [[/strikethrough]]^[[o]]nodon, yet it is certainly cl^[[o]]ser to that genus than to Delphinapterus." N[[strikethrough]] r [[/strikethrough]]^[[o]]w the first query that arises is whether the Halifax spec^[[i]]men is the M. monoceras or somethin[[strikethrough]] r [[/strikethrough]]^[[g]] else. As I c^[[o]]mpared
them in New York I could not see what seemed to me a specific difference, but my experience is limited as to whales and Mr. Andrews had gone then so we did not look them over together. I h^[[o]]pe that I am not keeping your letters, which you so kindly let me take,too long.I will soon return them. I send herewith a photo of the hyoid,all there is of it, of our Vermont specimen. It is full size. Very truly yours ^[[G. H. Perkins]]
[[preprinted]] My Post-Office Address is [[dotted line]] My Telegraph Address is [[dotted line]][[/preprinted]] Smithsonian Inst [[preprinted]] My Express Address is [[dotted line]][[/preprinted]] Washington D.C. [[preprinted]] (Keep the Chief Clerk informed of addresses by means of the special card.) Department of the Interior United States Geological Survey [[/preprinted]] Mar. 11th [[preprinted]][[dotted line]] ,190 [[/preprinted]] 8 OK's Dr. F. W. True, Head Curator, U.S N. Mus. Washington, D.C. Dear True, I have your note about [[underline]] Zeuglodon, [[/underline]] &c. My information is to this effect. [[margin note in pencil]] Basilosaurus & Zygorhiza [[/margin note in pencil]] [[underline]] Alabama. [[/underline]] Zeuglodon collected by Schuchert came from Upper Jacksonian beds at the very top of the [[strikethrough]] true [[/strikethrough]] Eocene. It is not certain that is not also common to the lower Oligocene. [[margin note in pencil]] | Dorudon | [[/margin note in pencil]] [[underline]] South Carolina [[/underline]] J. Tuomey reports from the greensand layer of his Santee beds a cetacean he refers to [[underline]] Zeuglodon [[/underline]] and says was described & figured by Gibbes. This horizon corresponds to the Jacksonian of Alabama and is certainly not older. [[margin note in pencil]] Agorophius [[/margin note in pencil]] II He also notes from the Ashley beds of Greer's Landing (Mazyck's plantation) a cetacean which he refers to [[underline]] Zeuglodon. [[/underline]] This I judge to be different from either of the
foregoing. The Ashley beds are Miocene, at least the rock he describes is Miocene, though there is the possibility that part of the group he refers to the "Ashley" may be Oligocene. There has been no careful reexamination of these beds since Tuomeys time and his list of fossils are muddled and his stratigraphical correlations unreliable, except in broad lines. He included in his "Eocene", the Oligocene and part of the Miocene. The lower Eocene of the Gulf States has not been recognized yet in S. Carolina, and Tuomey supposed that the Eocene he found, represented the whole column; where as it only covers the Claibornian and Jacksonian or middle and Upper Eocene. Yours very truly, Wm. H. Dall
Nomini - 1 trip 12.00 Richmond - 1 " [[dittos for: trip]] 20.00 Belleville - 1 " [[dittos for: trip]] 16.00 (Kenysville near Williamsburg [[underlined]] Va [[/underlined]] from Richmond) - 1 " [[dittos for: trip]] 8.00 Amer Mus. 1 " [[dittos for: trip]] 35.00 Phila Mus. 2 " [[dittos for: trip]] 72.00 Charleston S.C. 1 " [[dittos for: trip]] 42.00 Lyon's Cr. Md. 1 " [[dittos for: trip]] 9.00 Huntington Md. 1 " [[dittos for: trip]] 8.00 Hughesville Md. 1 " [[dittos for: trip]] 12.40 Shiloh &c. N.J. 1 " [[dittos for: trip]] 30.00
[[Table with 8 columns, the first being the month and the next 7 being the days of the week]] [[column headings]] [[blank]] S M T W Th F Sat [[/column headings]] Sept. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. [[strikethrough]] 31 31 [[/strikethrough]] [[series of seven horizontal lines correcting days of the month underneath names of days]] Oct. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30 31. [[/table]] 2.[[underlined]] 00 [[/underlined]] 9.[[underlined]] 00 [[/underlined]] 5.[[underlined]] 00 [[/underlined]] [[Table]] S. M. T. W. Th. F. Sat. Sept. (1) 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. Oct. (1) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. (1) 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. (2) 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. (3) 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. (4) 29. 30 31. Nw. 1 2 3 4 10 (1) [[strikethrough]] Ten [[/strikethrough]] 6 trips to C.B., (RR. ticket @ 1.00) 1.75 x 6 = 10.50 (or special exclustion 1.25 x 10 = 12.50) (ticket @ 50 [[superscript]] c ea [[/superscript]] ) (2) 1 trip to Nomini, Va 16.00 (3) 1 " [[Ditto for: trip]] to Richmond, Va 20.00 (3) 1 " " [[Dittos for: trip to]] Kingsville, [[strikethrough]] [[?] [[/strikethrough]] from Richmd 8.00 (4) 1 " [[Ditto for: trip]] to Salem & Shiloh, N. J. 30.00 [[line]] 1 trip to N.Y. 35.00 2 " " [[Dittos for: trip to]] Phila @ 36.00 72.00 [[line indicating addition]] 191.50 [[strikethrough]] 1 " " [[Dittos for: trip to Charleston 42.00 [[/strikethrough] [[line]] 1 trip to Charleston 42.00 Spring 6 trips to C.B. 10.50 [[left margin]] 6.00 $ [[/left margin]] [[line indicating addition]] 244.00
[[preprinted]] Smithsonian Institution UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM [[line]] MEMORANDUM [[/preprinted]] Sept 22, 1905 Dr. R. Rathbun Assistant Secrty Dear Mr. Rathbun :- Last spring [[insertion]] [[strikethrough]] ^ with the concurance of Dr [[Mccull?]] [[/strikethrough]] [[/insertion]] you [[strikethrough]] wr [[/strikethrough]] were kind enough to approve [[insertion]] ^ a [[/insertion]] [[strikethrough]] my [[/strikethrough]] plan [[insertion]] ^ which I had formulated [[/insertion]] for collecting some [[strikethrough]] fossil [[/strikethrough]] specimens of fossil cetaceans from Maryland and elsewhere [[strikethrough]] along the Atlantic [[/strikethrough]] in the Eastern States, and [[strikethrough]] made an [[/strikethrough]] [[insertion]] ^ to [[/insertion]] set aside the sum of $50.00 for that purpose. On account of the [[Pallad?]] Exposition work and other matters, I was unable to do as much as I had hoped, [[strikethrough]] and [[/strikethrough]] but visited Charles County, Md., Yorktown, Va., and [[strikethrough]] Chesap the [[/strikethrough]] Calvert Co., Md. From the last-mentioned locality I obtained a large number of valuable specimens - I did not spend the [[insertion]] ^ whole [[/insertion]] amount allotted me, [[strikethrough]] I am amp [[/strikethrough]] but was, of course, obliged to turn in the unexpended portion at the close of the fiscal year. I am anxious to go
[[preprinted]] Smithsonian Institution UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM [[line]] MEMORANDUM [[/preprinted]] 2 on with this undertaking [[strikethrough]] again [[/strikethrough]] during [[strikethrough]] this [[/strikethrough]] the fall and winter, and would ask that another allotment be made for the same purpose as before. What I plan to do [[insertion]] ^ this fall [[/insertion]] is to visit the Calvert Cliffs, Md., several [[strikethrough]] temp [[/strikethrough]] times (the trip costs from $1.25 to $1.75), the Nomini Cliffs, Va., once, [[strikethrough]] the [[/strikethrough]] Richmond & Kingsville, Va., once, and Salem & Shiloh, N.J., once. These are collecting trips. [[strikethrough]] In a [[/strikethrough]] After the weather becomes unfavorable for outdoor work, [[strikethrough]] I should like to make [[/strikethrough]] or during the winter, I should like to make two trips to Philadelphia to examine and compare [[insertion]] ^ the very important collection of [[/insertion]] types in the Academy of Natural Sciences (Cope's & Leidy's species [[insertion]] ^ are nearly all there [[/insertion]]) ; [[insertion]] ^ and [[/insertion]] one trip to New York, to examine the Holmes coll. [[insertion]] ^ and other material [[/insertion]] in the American Museum. [[strikethrough]] I estimate that [[/strikethrough]] I estimate that the expenses connected with the above-mentioned work would be about $200.00, but this includes items for subsistence in New York and Philadelphia [[insertion]] ^ some of [[/insertion]] which [[strikethrough]] may [[/strikethrough]] would be [[strikethrough]] at least partly [[/strikethrough]] eliminated, if I can arrange to stay with friends. The expenditures would extend over from 4 to 6 months. Yours very sincerely
[[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM S. P. LANGLEY Secretary, Smithsonian Institution RICHARD RATHBUN Assistant Secretary, in charge of U. S. National Museum WASHINGTON, D. C., [[/preprinted]] September ^[[26]], 1905. Dr. F. W. True, Head Curator, Department of Biology, U. S. National Museum. Dear Doctor True: Acting upon your letter of the 22nd instant, I have issued instructions authorizing you to visit such points in Virginia, Maryland and New Jersey as you desire, for the purpose of collecting fossil cetaceans, and have set aside $90.00. After the first of January, I shall be glad if you will bring this matter up again, so that you may be authorized to visit Philadelphia and New York for the purpose of examining and comparing the collection of types and other important material in the Academy of Natural Sciences and the American Museum of Natural History. Very truly yours, ^[[R. Rathbun]] Assistant Secretary in charge of National Museum.
[[underlined]] Details Balto Phila & Annapolis [[/underlined]] July 2, 1907 D[[superscript]] r [[/superscript]]. R. Rathbun Assnt Sety [[?]] USM Dear Sir:- I have the honor to report that [[strikethrough]] I finished the del work [[/strikethrough]] on June 29, 1907. I finished the work on the types specimens of fossil whales for which I was detailed under dates of Jan 26 and Mch. 22, 1907. [[strikethrough]] I visited [[/strikethrough]] In this connection, I visited Baltimore six times, between Feb. 2 and May 11, and examined all the types which were discoverable in [[strikethrough]] the [[/strikethrough]] [[insert]] ^ the collection of [[/insert]] Johns Hopkins University, the Geological Survey of Maryland, and the Womans College. Having learned that three types were contained in the exhibit of the Maryland Geological Survey in the Capitol of Annapolis, I visited that place on June 29 and examined them. Earlier in June, I went to Philadelphia and [[strikethrough]] studied all the [[/strikethrough]], spent a week in studying all the types [[insert]] ^ and related specimens [[/insert]] which were to be found in the Academy of Natural Sciences. Of the total number of 78 species of North American fossil ceta-
2 oceans, [[insertion]] ^ thus far described [[/insertion]] 37 were [[strikethrough]] examined [[/strikethrough]] found and examined in the museums above mentioned, 2 are preserved in the Natural Museum, 3 are stated by Dr C R Eastman to be in the Museum of Comparative Zoology ([[strikethrough]] th [[/strikethrough]] on of which [[strikethrough]] was [[/strikethrough]] passed through my hand this year), [[strikethrough]] and [[/strikethrough]] 2 are understood to be in the American Museum of Natural History, [[strikethrough]] In [[/strikethrough]] and [[strikethrough]] all 44 types have [[/strikethrough]] one is in the statehouse at Monpelier Pt. In all, 45 types have been seen or located, leave [[strikethrough]] 4 [[/strikethrough]] 33 [[insertion]] ^ yet [[/insertion]] to be [[strikethrough]] yet [[/strikethrough]] found. Some of these are probably in Philadelphia [[insertion]] ^ though [[insertion]] ^ they were [[/insertion]] not traceable at the time of my visit, [[/insertion]] x [[strikethrough]] and [[/strikethrough]] I left a list of them with Mr [[Witiner Stine?]] of the Academy of Natural Sciences, who promises [[strikethrough]] li [[/strikethrough]] to have a search made for them - Of [[strikethrough]] them [[/strikethrough]] [[insertion]] ^ the remainder apart [[/insertion]] are probably in some museum in North Carolina, and the rest scattered. [[strikethrough]] Probably [[/strikethrough]] A [[strikethrough]] some [[/strikethrough]] few [[insertion]] ^ of them [[/insertion]] may never be found as they have not come to the notice of any palaeontologist for many years. It is my intention [[insertion]] ^ to honour to [[/insertion]] continue to trace them as far as possible - My [[strikethrough]] account of [[/strikethrough]] expense - account is enclosed herewith. It exceeds the allotment originally made by $8.60. [[strikethrough]] This is due to the high cost [[/strikethrough]] [[insertion]] [[?]] shown by $2.60 [[/insertion]]
3 [[strikethrough]] increased cost of living in Philadelphia [[/strikethough]] - but I hope it may be [[strikethrough]] found [[/strikethrough]] possible to [[strikethrough]] extend [[/strikethrough]] increase the allotment sufficiently to cover this excess, [[insertion]] which was due to high rates of subsistence in Philadelphia [[/insertion]] Yours respectfully HCB
(20) SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. - LIBRARY U.S. NATIONAL MUSEUM [[line]] Signature, ^[[FWT]] Date, ,190 . [[line across page]] AUTHOR. TITLE. [[line across page]] ^[[Ehrlich C} ]] ^[[Beitrage zur Paleontologie Lintz 1855]] ^[[nnot in S.C. Try Geol. Scien.]] [[line across page]] ^[[Not in Geol. Science. Mar. 12/09]] RECEIVED. Signature, Date, , 190 . 13-107 (Over.)
INSTRUCTIONS. [[line]] 1. Write only a single title on each card. 2. Give name of author and title of work as fully as possible. 3. When requests for books are made, cards should be signed in the upper left-hand corner only. 4. The receipt at the bottom of the card must be signed when the books are delivered to applicants. 5. Borrowers should request their receipts upon returning books to the Library; otherwise books will remain charged against them. 13-107
Cambridge, Mass., Feb. 6, 1908. My dear Sir;- P,ease accept cordial thanks for your interesting characterization of Schizodelphis remains from the Atlantic Border Miocene. Very truly yours, ^[[C.R.Eastman]]
[[postal marks: Boston, Washington, Cambridge Station]] [[postage: One Cent Stamp]] [[preprinted]] POSTAL CARD THE SPACE BELOW IS FOR THE ADDRESS ONLY [[/preprinted]] Dr. F. W. True, U.S.National Museum, WASHINGTON, D.C.
[[stamped]] FEB 13 1909 [[/stamped]] [[preprinted]] THE ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES OF PHILADELPHIA LOGAN SQUARE [[/preprinted]] Feb. 10/09 [[stamped]] R.I.G. | FEB 11 1909 [[/stamped]] Receipt acknowledged Feb 15. 09 [[underlined]] SCB [[/underlined]] My dear Dr True I found the [[underlined]] specimen [[/underlined]] without difficulty & have had the loan approved. The specimen is being packed & will be [[underlined]] forwarded today or tomorrow [[/underlined]] Sincerely yours Whitmer Stone Curator. [[underlined]] Eurhinodelphis [[/underlined]] frag. of skull. Returned to Mr. Stone in person, Apr. 24, 1909 by FWT
[[image: postmark Philadelphia, PA Mar 11 1909 7 PM]] [[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM WASHINGTON, D.C. [[line]] OFFICIAL BUSINESS PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID PAYMENT OF POSTAGE, $300 [[/preprinted]] Mr. F. W. True U. S. National Museum Washington D. C.
Eurhinodelphis My dear Dr. True There is no objection to casting the bone as you suggest Glad to have you do so Sincerely yours Witmer Stone [[line]] Curator 3/11/09
[[purple stamp]] W. de. G.R. | FEB 11 1909 [[/purple stamp]] To Mr. Ravenel: I inquired of [[NuStone?]] about this specimen & it seems he is going to send it. If you agree to the transaction, will you please send these papers to Mr. Brown as an announcement? FW True
Manual of Geology - By Ebenezer Emmons - 2[[superscript]] d [[/superscript]] Edition. 1860. P. 211. "-185. [[underlined]] The Eocene Formation of the Atlantic Slope [[/underlined]]. xxx P. 212. Between the Grove and Vance's Ferry, on the Santee river, S. C., there is a continuous, white soft limestone, extending forty miles, which belongs to this formation. xxx The Eocene of Alabama is, perhaps, more perfectly developed than in North and South Carolina, particularly at St. Stephen's and Clairbourne, containing Plagiostoma dumosum, Pecten Poulsoni, Scutella Lyellii, and bones of the Zeuglodon. xxx P. 238. - [[[underlined]] Miocene [[/underlined]]] The Cetacean, fig. 187 (2), is a remarkable form of tooth for this family - having the resemblance to the canine of the Hippopotamus.
Emmons - 2 [[image - pencil drawing]] Fig. 181. "Tooth of an Eocene Whale." (P. 213) [[image - pencil drawing]] 1. [[image - pencil drawing]] 2. [[image - pencil drawing]] 3. Fig. 182. "cetaean of the Eocene. 1,2,3. Different teeth of the Zeuglodon, an Eocene Cetacean." (P. 214)
Emmons 3 [[image - detailed pencil drawing of a fossil]] Fig. 187 (2) "[Onto]cetus Emmonsi (Leidy); Cetacean. (Half Natural Size)." [[underlined]] P. 219. [[/underlined]]
[[underlined]] Synopsis of the Vertebrata of the Miocene of Cumberland County, New Jersey [[/underlined]] By E. D. Cope. (Proc. Amer. Philos. Soc. 14, 1875, pp. 361-364.) P. 361. - "The marls of the Miocene period appear in a limited area in Southwestern New Jersey, chiefly in Cumberland County. xxx P. 363. "[[underlined]] Incertae sedis. Agabelus porcatus [[/underlined]], Cope, gen. et. sp. nov. [Description]. xxx [[underlined]] Mammalia. Squalodon atlanticus [[/underlined]], Leidy, Cope. Proceed. Academy, Philada., 1867, p. 153; [[underlined]] Macrophoca atlantica [[/underlined]], Leidy, [[underlined]] I.c. [[/underlined]] 1856, p. 220. [[underlined]] Zarhachis velox [[/underlined]], Cope. Proceed. Acad. Philadelphia, 1869 (March). [[underlined]] Priscodelphinus harlani [[/underlined]], Leidy, Proceed. Acad. Phila., 1851, p. 327. [[underlined]] Priscodelphinus lacertosus [[/underlined]], Cope, [[underlined]] Delphinapterus lacertosus, [[/underlined]] Cope, ibidem, 1868, p. 190. [[underlined]] Priscodelphinus grandaevus [[/underlined]], Leidy, ibidem, 1851, p. 327. [[underlined]] Tretosphys grandaevus [[/underlined]], Cope, ibidem, 1869 (March). [[underlined]] Priscodelphinus uraeus [[/underlined]], Cope, [[underlined]] Tretosphys uraeus [[/underlined]], Cope, 1869 (March).
Cope. 2 The four preceding species may be regarded as congeneric for the present, as they are similar in the forms of the vertebrae, especially in [p. 364] the lumbar diapophyses - A few years ago I defined a genus, based on several species from the Miocene of Maryland, in which the lumbar diapophyses are spiniform. Supposing the [[underlined]] Priscodelphinus harlani [[/underlined]] of Leidy to possess the same character I retained the same generic name for the Maryland species- After an examination of considerable material from the New Jersey locality, including bones of [[underlined]] P. harlanii [[/underlined]], I have failed to observe a single species with the spinous processes alluded to. It thus becomes evident that [[underlined]] Priscodelphinus [[/underlined]] must be retained for the species termed by me [[underlined]] Tretosphys [[/underlined]], while that for which I retained the name [[underlined]] Priscodelphinus [[/underlined]] must receive a new one. For this I propose [[underlined]] Belosphys [[/underlined]] with [[underlined]] B. spinosus [[/underlined]], Cope, as type, and [[underlined]] B. atropius, B. conradi [[/underlined]], and [[underlined]] B. stenus [[/underlined]] as species. At the same time I add that the presence of [[underlined]] Ixacanthus coelospondylus [[/underlined]], Cope, in the New Jersey Miocene mentioned in Cook's Geological Survey of New Jersey by the writer, is doubtful."
F. Humerus of a Sireman (fossil) from Polk Co., Florida. In Dept of Geology [[image - pencil sketch of a bone]] Florida
F [[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM. [[line]] [[/preprinted]] [[strikethrough]] [[underlined]] Phoca holitscheusis [[/underlined]] Brühl < Mullh. Zool. Inst. Unv. Pesth. 40 Wien, 1866 or 1860 [[/strikethrough]] [[underlined]] P. pontica [[/underlined]] Eicher. [[strikethrough]] √ [[/strikethrough]] Lethaea Ross. 1853 - Peters < [[underlined]] SBak, Wien, [[/underlined]] 1867, 110 √ √ [[strikethrough]] Do [[/strikethrough]] < Denksh., 40, 1880
[[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM [[line]] [[/preprinted]] Eichwald Lethea rossica Stuttgart, 1853, p. 391. pl. 13. figs 1-37 [[line across page]] Phoca rugidens H. Von Meyer Jahrbuch, 1845, 309 Bones found at Neudorff bei Presbourg
[[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM. [[line]] [[/preprinted]] [[strikethrough]] [[underlined]] Dee Phoca moores [[/underlined]] Q.J. Geol. Soc. 66, 1890, 446, pl. 18 fig 3. [[/strikethrough]] Red Crag Smaller than P. vitulenoides - very short descr. & poor figs -
[[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM. [[line]] [[/preprinted]] [[strikethrough]] [[underlined]] Mesotaria ouduana [[/underlined]] Delfortie Act. Soc. Linn. Bordeaux, 1872 - [[underlined]] M. leclercii [[/underlined]] Delf. do - [[Ditto for: Act. Soc. Linn. Bordeaux, 1872 - ]] [[/strikethrough]] [[strikethrough]] √ [[underlined]] Prustiplioca occitanica [[/underlined]] Gen. Zool. & Pal. Travç., 2 d. ed. 1859 p 272 [[underlined]] Jaw [[/underlined]] [[/strikethrough]] √ [[underlined]] Monatherum maeoticum [[/underlined]] Echivalv Nordman. Pal. S. Russ., 1858 [[strikethrough]] [[underlined]] M. neqosideus [[/underlined]] Owen. [[strikethrough]] L [[/strikethrough]] Leith Adams, Q. J. GS. . 35. 1879, 517 pl. 25 - [[/strikethrough]] [[underlined]] Teeth [[/underlined]]
√ H. von Meyer - Jaherbuch, 1845, p. 309 - Teeth. no descr.' "[[underlined]] Phoca ? rugideus [[/underlined]]" √ Gervais. P. - Zool. & paleont. Françaises, 2 [[superscript]] d [[/superscript]] ed. . 1859 p. 272 - Jaw √ Steendachlieo - L Sitzber. M. N. Class. K. [[Akaduriss?]] Ovien, 1859 - Fishes. Passg ref. to [[underlined]] Pleuca. [[/underlined]] Eichivald - Lethea rossica., 1853, p. 39. pl 13 fig 1 - 37 [[strikethrough]] No [[/strikethrough]] [[underlined]] Phoca pontica [[/underlined]] Nordmam. - Paleontol. Sud-Russland, 1858 } Text & Atlas }
[[underlined]] [[Plevcanella?]] [[/underlined]] D.r. short & very think. B. G. urde [[underlined]] Marathon [[/underlined]] Size very large. [[strikethrough]] No. B.g. ? [[/strikthrough]] D.r. stuck - B.G. urde Prophrea
F. 19.0 [[underlined]] Mesotaria [[/underlined]] Length of humerus 190 [[superscript]] mm [[/superscript]] Bicipital groove strongly developed - no supra-condylar foramen [[underlined]] Palaeophirca [[/underlined]] No supracondylar foramen - Bicipital grooves narrow. Resembles [[underlined]] [[Monacleus?]] [[/underlined]] in profile [[underlined]] Callophoca [[/underlined]] Massive. Deltoid ridge very strong and not extending far distally - No supracon foramen [[underlined]] Platyphoca [[/underlined]] Deltoid ridge feeble and edge of bicipital grooves probably not sufficiently developed to form a genuine channel. Bone slender External face of shaft proximally is convex A strong external [[epiliablear?]] [[strikethrough]] occt [[/strikethrough]] ridge. [[strikethrough]] ^ [[strikethrough]] From this [[underlined]] Leptophoca [[/underlined]], differs in much smaller size and slender form; distinct development of lesser tuberosity; exctension of deltoid ridge far proximally; curvature of shaft & shape of neck posteriorly [[overwritten]] ) [[/overwritten]] ; concavity of exterior face of shaft proximally) [[underlined]] Gryphoca [[/underlined]] Bicipital groove wide & deep Deltoid ridge very strong
[[underlined]] Amphicynodon [[/underlined]] Filhol < Ann. Sci Geol., 12. [[insertion]] Art. 3. [[/insertion]] 1882. p. 32 [[insertion]] ^ pl. 8 [[/insertion]] fig. 23 & 2 [[underlined]] Proplesictes [[/underlined]] [[underlined]] Do. [[/underlined]] [[Ditto for: Ann. Sci Geol., 12. Art. 3. 1882]] fig. 48 [[underlined]] Hyaenodon aymardi [[/underlined]]. [[underlined]] do. [[/underlined]] [[Ditto for: Ann. Sci Geol., 12. Art. 3. 1882]] p. 48 [[underlined]] Phoca moori [[/underlined]] Newton < Q. Jour. Geol. Soc. 46, 1890, 446. pl. 18
Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, London, D 17 Musical Times, London, D 50 Oxford University Gqzette, London, D 21 Catalogue of titled entries of Books, Washington, H 11 Bulletin for Nov. 11 1905.
^[[F. Field work]] [[preprinted]] in reply please refer to [[/preprinted]] CDW [[preprinted]] and date of this letter SUBJECT: [[/preprinted]] Allotment. [[preprinted]] Address all communications to "Director, U. S. Geological Survey Washington, D. C." [[/preprinted]] PMB [[preprinted]] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Washington, D. C. [[/preprinted]] March 23, 1905. Dr. F. W. True, U. S. National Museum, Washington, D. C. Dear Dr. True: I have been considering your letter of March 7, in relation to the paleo-vertebrate work being carried on by the Survey. As you are probably aware, we have three of Professor Marsh's volumes under way. I find that they will take so much money this year that we cannot make any appropriation from the limited fund ($10,000) available for paleontology. I should like very much to aid in paying your field and traveling expenses, if it were practicable to do so. You might have a talk with Dr. R. S. Woodward, President of the Carnegie Institution, and see if he would favor making a grant of five or six hundred dollars for the work. Sincerely yours, [[signature]] Charles Walcott [[/signature]] Director.
F. Fieldwork Mch 7. 1905 Mr. C. D. Walcott Director, U.S. Geological Survey Washington DC. Dear Mr. Walcott: I write to inquire whether you would be disposed to assist in [[strikethrough]] the enterprise of [[/strikethrough]] having [[insertion]] ^ some work done on the [[/insertion]] fossil cetaceans of the United States - [[strikethrough]] worked up [[/strikethrough]] The little we know about them is based [[insertion]] ^ chiefly [[/insertion]] on the work done by Leidy and Cope many years ago. The material they had to work with was [[strikethrough]] scant [[/strikethrough]] unsatisfactory [[strikethrough]] both as to [[/strikethrough]] in quality and [[strikethrough]] to [[/strikethrough]] in quantity. Both paleontologists I think intended [[mark to indicate phrasing should be "intended I think"]] to [[strikethrough]] work [[/strikethrough]] go more extensively into the subject but [[strikethrough]] neither of them did so [[/strikethrough]] were prevented by various circumstances from doing so. Recently, Mr. Case of the Maryland Geological Survey, has taken the subject up anew and has published an article in the Report of the [[strikethrough]] Mary [[/strikethrough]] Survey which appeared a [[strikethrough]] few [[/strikethrough]] week or two ago. This article, however, contains little more than a series of abstracts from Cope's papers of from 15 to 30 years ago. The reason why Mr. Case could not make any special advance seems to be that he did not have any considerable amount of new material and did not know very much about this [[strikethrough]] cetaceans as a group or special group [[/strikethrough]] particular order of
2 mammals - I [[underlined]] do [[/underlined]] profess to know something about the cetaceans, and furthermore have collected a considerable amount of new material and [[strikethrough]] kno [[/strikethrough]] can get more. The principal localities for these fossils, as you know, are in the Tertiary around Chesapeake Bay and in South Carolina and New Jersey - I propose to visit the localities I know about and to hunt up others, and to get together as much new material as possible. Then I propose to study and compare this material with the types in Philadelphia, and to examine the small collections now existing in Baltimore, New York, and Charleston, S.C. [[strikethrough]] Furthermore [[/strikethrough]], In addition I intend to [[strikethrough]] t [[/strikethrough]] investigate the relation of the genera, etc., proposed by American paleontologists to the European forms. The literature for this study is nearly all available in Washington, and what is lacking can be obtained without [[strikethrough]] great [[/strikethrough]] much difficulty or expense_ When I have furthered this work, I hope the subject will be in a more satisfactory condition than at present_ In many respects I should prefer to undertake the work as a private enterprise, but I have not the means to do so, without making [[strikethrough]] considerable [[/strikethrough]]
3 sacrifices [[strikethrough]] for which I am badly prepared [[/strikethrough]] You may think it odd that I should not [[insertion]] ^ try to [[/insertion]] obtain funds from the Museum [[strikethrough]] for this [[work?]] undertaking [[/strikethrough]], but I have been told repeatedly this year that there is no money for field work, etc., etc., and as [[insertion]] ^ the last [[/insertion]] Congress did not increase the appropriation, I suppose the conditions will be the same next year -
[[purple stamp]] R.R. | MAR 7 1905 [[/purple stamp]] [[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION WASHINGTON [[/preprinted]] Mch. 7 1905 D[[superscript]] r [[/superscript]]. R. Rathbun Assistant Secretary Dear Mr. Rathbun: I presume you will not have any objection to my applying to Mr. Walcott to see if I can get him to allot a little money for an investigation of the fossil cetaceans of the United States. Some field-work would be required, and as the Museum has no money at present for such undertakings, I have to look elsewhere, or [[strikethrough]] else [[/strikethrough]] meet the expense myself. I have been keeping watch of this subject for a number of years and am convinced that the time is now ripe for taking it up. I have talked with D[[superscript]] r [[/superscript]] Merrill about the matter and do not understand that he would have any objection to my breaking into his Department
[[blank page]] [[end page]] [[start page]] in this way - whether Mr. Walcott will do anything, is, of course, uncertain, as the Survey seems to have practically abandoned vertebrate paleontology - It seems to me a vast misfortune that the Government is allowing the great treasures of American vertebrate paleontology to go to local museums. Yours very sincerely, FW True Dear Dr True - I see no objections to your proposition. R. Rathbun Asst Sec
^[[F.]] [[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM S. P. LANGLEY Secretary, Smithsonian Institution RICHARD RATHBUN Assistant Secretary, in charge of U. S. National Museum WASHINGTON, D. C., [[/preprinted]] December 2, 1905. Dr. F. W. True, Head Curator, Department of Biology, U. S. National Museum. Dear Sir: Your letter of December 1, advising me that you will not be able to undertake any additional field work in Maryland, Virginia, or New Jersey, before the close of the calendar year, has been received. I note of the total amount alloted you for this work, $84.80 has been unexpended, and that the collections made at the Calvert Cliffs during the past fall amount to about 400 specimens of cetacean bones, bringing up the total collections from Calvert Cliffs and the Nomini Cliffs, Virginia, to 1000 specimens. The question of your visiting Philadelphia and New York in this connection can be taken up during January. Yours respectfully, ^[[R. Rathbun]] Assistant Secretary in charge of National Museum.
[[preprinted]] Museum of Comparative Zoölogy, CAMBRIDGE, MASS. [[/preprinted]] ^[[Foss. whale]] May 27, 1906. ^[[Ansd May 31]] Dr. F.W.True, U.S.Nat. Museum, Washington, D.C., My dear Sir:- There are preserved in this Museum a number of interesting fossil Cetacean remains, amongst which are the types of Copés genera [[underlined]] Lophocetus [[/underlined]] and [[underlined]] Anoplonassa [[/underlined]], and Leidy's [[underlined]] "Delphinus" occiduus [[/underlined]]. These I have been studying recently, with the intention of preparing some notes upon them; and because the rostrum of Anoplonassa seemed to present anomalous features, I submitted it to several of my New York friends for examination, and finally offered it through Mr. Gidley for your inspection. In case you find it sufficiently interesting to comment upon it, I should be very glad to quote in full any remarks that you may be pleased to offer for that purpose; of if you merely care to express an opinion as to its probable relationships, it would be very agreeable to me to be able to state it in the paper I am preparing. The specimen may be returned at your convenience with charges to be collected. I am free to admit that I have not been able to form any particularly clear notion as to the relations of this unique fossil, although there seems little reason to doubt its Cetacean, and perhaps Ziphioid (?) nature. In looking over Abel's recent memoir on Odontocetes, it struck me that there was considerable affinity between this rostrum and the form described by Abel as [[underlined]] Mioziphius belgicus [[/underlined]]: but on this point I am sure you will be able to enlighten us much more clearly. Thanking you in advance for whatever communication you may choose to offer, I am, Very truly yours, ^[[C.R. Eastman]]
F [[double underline]] Summary [[/double underline]] Calvert Cliffs 70.00 [[Lyon's?]] Creek 9.00 Huntingtown 8.80 Hughesville (Charles Co.) 12.40 New Jersey (Shiloh) [[strikethrough]] 22.50 [[/strikethrough]] 30.00 Richmond 20.00 Yorktown 16.00 Kings Mill 8.00 Nomini 12.00 New York 35.00 Phila. [[overwritten]] [[42.00?]] [[/overwritten]] 72.00 Charleston 42.00 [[line]] [[overwritten]] [[230?]] [[/overwritten]] 347.70 Excavations 100.00 Incidentals 100.00 [[line]] [[strikethrough]] 427.70 [[/strikethrough]] [[strikethrough]] 527.70 [[/strikethrough]] 535..20
[[double underline]] Spring [[/double underline]] [[underline]] Calvert Cliffs [[/underline]] R.R. Fare 1.00 Subsistence [[strikethrough]] Hotel [[/strikethrough]] 4.00 Boat 5.00 [[line]] 10.00 x 7 $70.00 [[underline]] Lyon's Creek Stations [[/underline]] R.R. fare 1.00 Subsistence [[strikethrough]] Hotel [[/strikethrough]] 3.00 Conveyance [[strikethrough]] [[Jean?]] [[/strikethrough]] 5.00 9.00 x 1 9.00 [[underline]] Huntingtown Stations [[/underline]] R. R. fare 3.80 Subsistence [[strikethrough]] Hotel [[/strikethrough]] 5.00 [[line]] 8.80 x 1 8.80 [[Hugheville?]] (Charles Co.) Stations R.R. fare 2.40 Subsistence [[strikethrough]] Hotel [[/strikethrough]] 5.00 Conveyance [[strikethrough]] Wagon [[/strikethrough]] 5.00 [[line]] 12.40 x 1 12.40 New Jersey (Shiloh) R.R. fare 10.00 Subsistence [[strikethrough]] Hotel [[/strikethrough]] 1[[overwritten]] 7 [[/overwritten]]5.00 Conveyance [[strikethrough]] Wagon [[/strikethrough]] 5.00 [[line]] [[strikethrough]] 22.50 22.50 [[/strikethrough]] 30.00 x 1 [[strikethrough]] 22.50 [[/strikethrough]] 30.00
Webster True. 1. 95) .41.50 .0(050 x 100 =.50 [[underlined]] 475 [[/underlined]]
[[double underlined]] Fall [[/double underlined]] [[underlined]] Richmond, Va. [[/underlined]] R.R. fare 10.00 Hotel 10.00 [[line]] 20.00 x 1 20.00 [[underlined]] Yorktown (Belleville) [[/underlined]] Boat fare 10.00 Hotel 6.00 [[line]] 16.00 x 1 16.00 [[underlined]] Kingsmill near W[[superscript]] ms [[/superscript]]burg [[/underlined]] R.R. fare (from Richmd) 3.00 Hotel 5.00 [[line]] 8.00 x 1 8.00
[[double underlined]] Fall [[/underlined]] [[underlined]] Nomini, Va. [[/underlined]] Boat to Colonial Beach 1.00 Sail boat to Nomini 5.00 [[strikethrough]] Hotel Col. Beach [[/strikethrough]] subsistence @ 2 [[superscript]] 00 [[/superscript]] 6.00 [[line]] 12.00 x 1 12.00
[[double underlined]] Winter [[/double underlined]] [[underlined]] Philadelphia [[/underlined]] R.R. fare 6.00 [[strikethrough]] Hotel [[/strikethrough]] Subsistence 6 days @ 5 [[superscript]] 00 [[/superscript]] [[strikethrough]] 15.00 [[/strikethrough]] 30.00 [[line]] [[strikethrough]] 16.50 x 2 33.00 [[/strikethrough]] [[strikethrough]] 21.00 42.00 [[/strikethrough]] 36.00 x 2 72.00 [[underlined]] Charleston [[/underlined]] R. R. fare 32.00 Incidentals 10.00 [[line]] 42.00 x 1 42.00 New York R.R. fare 10.00 [[strikethrough]] Hotel [[/strikethrough]] Subsistence @ 5 [[superscript]] 00 [[/superscript]] 25.00 [[line]] 35.00 x 1 35.00
F. [[underline]] Fossil Sirenians [[line]] √ [[underline]] Manatus antiquus [[/underline]] Leidy Holmes' Post. Phoe. Foss S.C. 1860, 117, pl 24,figs 5 - 7 √ [[insertion]] ^ [[underline]] Tooth & rib [[/underline]] [[/insertion]] "Mainly rib fragments, mutilated vertebrae, & fragments of skulls. "A tooth" [ = Eotheroides] (Halicondae) √ [[underline]] Eotherium aegyptiacum [[/underline]] Owen < Q. J. Geol. Soc. 31, 1875, 100, pl. 3 figs 1 - 4 [[insertion]] ^ [[underline]] Brain-cast [[/underline]] [[/insertion]] Lydek. Cat Foss Man, 5, 13 √ [[underline]] Anoplonassa forcipata [[/underline]] Cope < Amer. Nat., 1890, 700, fig 2 [[underline]] JAW [[/underline]] [[underline]] Halitherium Schinzi [[/underline]] Kaup s. c. < See Lepsius, Able. Mitteloh. Geol. Ver., 1881, 1, pl. 1 - 10. [[underline]] H. chouqueti [[/underline]] Gaudry < Bull. Soc. Geol. 12, 1884, 372, pl -. √ [[underline]] H. canhami [[/underline]] Flower < Q. Jour. Geol. Soc., 30, 1844, [[strikethrough]]] pl [[/strikethrough]] p. 1, pl. 1 [[underline]] Portion of Skull [[/underline]] √ [[underline]] Crassitherium roubstum [[/underline]] Van Ben. [[strikethrough]] No fig [[/strikethrough]] < Bull Acad Belg (2) 32, 1871, 164, 1 pl. {2 vert. & frag skull √ [[underline]] Metaxytherium cordieri [[/underline]] Christol [[image]] [[image]] < Ann Sci. Nat., 15, 1841, 307, pl. 7 [[underline]] humerus [[/underline]] ( = Hippopot. medius, Cur. Oss Foss. 1, pl. 7 1828, figs 9 - 11)
2 [[strikethrough]] [[?]] [[/strikethrough]] (Halicoridae) [[underlined]] Eosiren libyca [[/underlined]] Andrews < Geol. Mag., 1902, P 293, fig. 1 - 3 [[end page]]
3 [[strikethrough]] 2 * [[/strikethrough]] [[underline]] M. studeri [[/underline]] Meyer. 1837 s.c. < see Studer, Abh. Schw. Pal. Gesell, 14, 1887, 3, pl. 1 - 2 √ [[underline]] M. lovisati [[/underline]] Capellini [[insertion]] ^ (Good summary of genera. R) [[/insertion]] [[strikethrough]] No fig [[/strikethrough]] < Mem. Acad. Sci. Bologna, [[insertion]] ^ (4) [[/insertion]] 7, 1886 [[insertion]] ^ 39 1 pl {Cervical vertebrae. [[underline]] Good. [[/underline]] [[/insertion]] √ [[underline]] M. bellunensse [[/underline]] Zigno s.c. < Mem. Inst. Venet., 18, 1875, [[insertion]] ^ 427 [[/insertion]] pl. [[overwritten]] -2 [[/overwritten]] 14 - 18. √ [[underline]] M. krahuletzi [[/underline]] [[insertion]] [[underline]] skull & teeth [[/underline]] [[/insertion]] Deperet [[strikethrough]] Sitzber. Akad. [[/strikethrough]] s. c. < Sitzber. Akad. Wiss. Wien, [[insertion]] ^ 104 pt. 1 [[/insertion]] 1895, [[strikethrough]] 104, 14, [[/strikethrough]] 395, pl. 2 figs 2 - 7 ([[underline]] Tooth [[/underline]]) √ [[underline]] M. Pergense? [[/underline]] Toula, < N. Jahrb. Min. Suppl. 1899, 459 [[underline]] Pachyacanthus skull fragments [[/underline]] √ [[underline]] Felsinotherium forestii [[/underline]] Capel. s. c. < Mem. Accad. Sci. Bologna, [[insertion]] ^ (3) [[/insertion]] 1, 1872, p. 605, pl 1 - 8 [[underline]] skull, [[insertion]] (fine!) [[/insertion]] ear bones, vertebrae. [[/underline]] Good set of figs. [[underline]] F. subapenninum [[/underline]] Bruno. 1839 No fig/ √ [[underline]] Miosiren Kockii [[/underline]] Dolls. < Bull. Belg. Geol. & Pal., 3, 1889, 415, s. c. fig 1 - 2 [[insertion]] ^ molar teeth [[/insertion]]; √ Cope, Amer. Nat. 1890, 699, fig 6. (molar teeth) √ [[underline]] Rhytiodus capgrandi [[/underline]] Lart. s. c. < Bull. Soc. Geve. France. 23, 1866, 673 [[insertion]] ^ [[undelrined]] skull; teeth; Atlas. [[/underlined]] [[/insertion]] √ s. c. Act. Soc. Linn. Bordeaux, 34, 1880, 131, pls 5 - 8
4 [[strikethrough]] 3 [[/strikethrough]] (Halicoridae) Genr. Zool & Pal. Trave. 1852, pl. 52, fig 2 √ [[underlined]] Hemicaulodon effodieus [[/underlined]] Cope < P. Amer. Philos Soc., 1871, 190, pl. 5 fig. 6 - [[underlined]] Tooth fragment [[/underlined]] √ [[underlined]] Dioplotherium maneganets [[/underlined]] Cope < PAUSP., 1883, 52, √ Amer. Nat. 1890. 700, pl. 25. (Incisor teeth & osinnom.) √ [[underlined]] Demostylus hesperus [[/underlined]] Marsh - Cal. Plio. < Amer Jour Sci, 35, 1888, 94. figs. 1 - 3 (Tooth) √ [[underlined]] Chronozom austiale [[/underlined]] de Vis < P. Sim Soc. NSW, 8, 1883, 392 [[insertion]] ^ pl 17 [[/insertion]] √ [[underlined]] Prolialicore dubaleni [[/underlnied]] Flot s.c. < Bull Soc. Geol. France, 15, 1887, 134 pl. [[insertion]] [[underlined]] Jaw & teeth [[/underlined]] [[/insertion]] [[line across page]] (Inchecludae) √ [[underlined]] Manatherum delheidi [[/underlined]] Harthaub < Zool. jalirb., [[strikethrough]] 2 [[Hiefk?]] [[/strikethrough]] IBand, 1886, 369 ([[underlined]] teeth skull figs. [[/underlined]]) √ [[underlined]] Ribodon limbatus [[/underlined]] Amegh. √ < Bol. Acad. hac. Geuc. Cordoba, [[insertion]] ^ 5 [[/insertion]] 1883, 112 [[strikethrough]] [[underlined]] Incluclus giganteus [[/underlined]] ? (Dr Kay, 1842) Leidy, [[/strikethrough]] √ Burmiesister, Anal. Mus. Bueues Acces, 14, 1885, 160, pl 3 - fig 18, Amegh., mam. Fossil. 1889, 493, pl. 23 [[underlined]] Tooth [[/underlined]]
5 [[strikethrough]] 4 [[/strikethrough]] (Prorastomidae) [[circled]] Remarkable beast! [[image - hand pointing down]] [[/circled]] √ [[underlined]] Prorastomus scienoides [[/underlined]] Owen ([[underlined]] skull [[/underlined]]) < Q. J. G. Soc., 11, 1855, 541, pl. 15 31, 1875, 559, pl. 28 - 29 ([[underlined]] Teeth, Skull & altas [[/underlined]]) √ [[underlined]] P. veroneusis [[/underlined]] Zigno < Mem. 1st. Veneto, 18, 1875, pl. 3 - 5 _ Sydekker, P. 35. 1892, 77. fig 1 [[underlined]] Teeth [[/underlined]] v (Inchedudae) √ [[underlined]] Trichedus geganteus [[/underlined]] (Leidy) DeKay? < Ext. Fauna; 1869, p. 414 √ [[underlined]] T. autequus [[/underlined]] (Holmer) < Post-flio. Fossils, S.C., pl. 24, figs 5 - 7 [[underlined]] G. mornatus [[/underlined]] ? (Leidy) < Ext. Vert Fauna, 1873, pl. 37, figs 16 - 17 √ [[underlined]] F. amer. fossilis [[/underlined]] (Leidy) Harlan ? < Ext Mamm. Fauna, 1869, 414
[[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM [[line]] MEMORANDUM [[/preprinted]] [[underlined]] American Fossil Sirenia [[/underlined]] [[underlined]] Provastonicdae [[/strikethrough]] Cope < [[strikethrough]] Am. Nat. 23, 1889, 876 [[/strikethrough]] " [[Ditto for: Cope]] < Am. Nat., 24, 1890, 698 [[strikethrough]] Haletheriidae [[/strikethrough]] [[underlined]] Do. [[/strikethrough]] [[Ditto for: Cope < Am. Nat., 24, 1890, 698]] as above √ [[underlined]] Deoplotherum mamgaulti [[/underlined]] Cope < PAUSP., 1883, 52 < [[strikethrough]] A.M. Nat., 17, 1883, 171 [[/strikethrough]] < Am Nat. 24, 1890, 700. pl. 25 [[underlined]] Tooth [[/underlined]] √ [[underlined]] Hemicanlodon effodieus [[/underlined]] Cope < P. Amer Plulers Sve. 11, 1869, 171. pl [[strikethrough]] 3 - 5 [[/strikethrough]] 5. for 6 < Am Nat. 24, 1890, 699 [[insertion]] ^ { "Known by a large superior tooth only" [[/insertion]] √ [[underlined]] Desmostyles hesperus [[/underlined]] Marsh [[symbol]] Teeth & vertebrae < Am. J. Sci., (3) 35, 94 - 96, 3 figs ([[underlined]] teeth [[/underlined]])
[[preprinted]] Museum of Comparative Zoology, CAMBRIDGE, MASS. [[/preprinted]] Nov. 5, 1906. Dear Dr. True;- I beg to thank you for your recent letter, and am very glad to see from it that we may shortly expect to get your Bulletin on Anoplonassa under way. All the figures that you desire can be pro^[[v]]ided for: the photos will make two plates of regular Bulletin size, and those of Ziphius can go in as text-figures. I was under the impression of havin^[[g]] sent you two views of the type specimen, but it seems not, and am accordingly sending you the other herewith. Perhaps the lateral aspect can best be arranged for here, as it is essential to have the negative. In preparing my own paper, which is now ready for printing, I have had occasion to go over Abel's various papers pretty carefully, and as far as I am able to judge, he would seem to have made good use of his material. He has a keen insight into details, but is perhaps to prone to generalize upon an insufficient body of facts. In this respect he might point an example to Bacon's saying: "How can a man be understanded of gre^[[a]]t matters, when he break^[[e]]th his mind on small observations?" He also seems to have a ^[[h]]appy faculty of bringing to bear on his special studies the results of his co-workers in other fields, as would appear from the use he has made of Dames and Fraas on Zeuglodonts, Kükenthal and Weber on Cetaceans in general. That which appealed to me most favorably was his analysis of progressive modifications of the dentition, and that which I am least ready to accept is his assumption of a dermal armoring amongst Squalodont prototypes. At any rate [[insertion]] ^[[^ one]] [[/insertion]] has a right to insist upon more authentic demonstration. Personally I am inclined to feel highly sceptical of his interpretation of "Alabamornis," though from the tenor of Lucas' notes in Science, it may be well to suspend judgment[[stirkethrough]] . [[/strikethrough]] for the present. Sincerely yours, ^[[C.R. Eastman]]
[[preprinted]] S. M. GARY Clerk Superior Court Halifax County Halilax , N.C. [[/preprinted]] July 16th,1908. ^[[Ansd July 17]] Mr. T.W.True, Washington,D.C. Dear Sir:- Your letter of Jult 3rd, reached here in my absence. Years ago I remember that a very large fossil bone was found in a deep ravine just below this place, and some parties worked quite a while trying to get it up, and I think they succeeded in getting up only a part of it. It was the opinion of many that it was the bones of a whale. I do not remember the length, but it was a [[underlined]] very [[/underlined]] long and large bone. Very truly ^[[S.M. Gary]]
July 17, 1908. Mr. S. M. Gary, Clerk of the Supreme Court, Halifax CO., Halifax, N. C. Dear Sir:- I beg to acknowledge with many thanks, the receipt of your letter of the 16th. inst. relative to the large fossil bones. On looking up the matter further, I find that the bones in question are probably those which were found about 1970 in t the Miocene marl at Quanky Creek, Roanoke River, Halifax County, and made the basis of a new genus and species by the later Prof. Cope, which he called [[underlined]] Mesoteras kerrianus [[/underlined]]. These specimens are now in the National Museum. With renewed thanks Yours very sincerely Head Curator of Biology.
[[image: postmark and stamp]] Frederick W. True Esq [[underlined]] re [[/underlined]] Department of Biology United States National Museum. Washington D. C. U.S. America.
[[reverse of envelope]] [[image: Washington D.C. postmark, dated Nov. 2 at 8:30 AM]]
For your kindness in sending a copy of ^[[The Whalebone Whales of the Western North Atlantic.]] please accept the thanks of C. Ishikawa. Professor of Zoology, College of Agriculture, Tokyo Imperial University.
[[preprinted]] AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY held at Philadelphia for Promoting Useful Knowledge (Founded 1743) [[line]] 104 South Fifth Street [[/preprinted]] ^[[Sent Jy 14/08]] May 13, 1908. ^[[Ansd May 19. 08 saying would pub. but asking a little delay on acc't of revising the MS.]] Dr. F. W. True, U.S. National Museum, Washington, D.C. Dear Dr. True:- The Secretaries will be very glad to receive the manuscript of the paper on the classification of the Cetacea, which you read before the Society at its late General Meeting, for publication in the "Proceedings". What became of you after the Meeting? I looked around for you at Dinner to have a little talk with you, and was quite disappointed to find that you had flown. I hope this was not because you were not feeling well. Very truly yours, ^[[I. Minis Hays - Sec'y]]
[[preprinted]] MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY, CAMBRIDGE, MASS. [[/preprinted]] July 6, 1908 Ansd July 8 Dr. F. W. True, Washington, D.C. Dear Mr. True- I am sending the drawings of the restorations, and shall be glad to have them OK'd and returned as soon as possible, so that the blocks can be made. Yours truly, Samuel Henshaw Curator
[[image: postal mark from Philadelphia 1908 Jul 15 4-PM]] [[preprinted]] [[image: Eagle surrounded by words "United States of America]] [[image: Image of President McKinley surrounded by words "Postage One Cent 1843-McKinley-1901"]] THE SPACE ABOVE IS RESERVED FOR POSTMARK. POSTAL CARD. THE SPACE BELOW IS FOR THE ADDRESS ONLY. [[/preprinted]] Dr. F. W. True U.S. National Museum Washington D.C.
104 South Fifth Street Philadelphia, U. S. A. The American Philosophical Society acknowledges with thanks the receipt of your ^[[ms. on the Classification of the Cetacea]] Very respectfully yours ^[[I. Minis Hays - Sec'y]] Philadelphia ^[[July 15, 1908]]
[[preprinted]] MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY CAMBRIDGE, MASS. [[/preprinted]] 20 May 1908 Dear Mr. True, I have your article on Dorudon and will take up the reproduction of the illustrations as soon as possible. Yours truly Samuel Henshaw
[[preprinted]] MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOÖLOGY, CAMBRIDGE, MASS. [[/preprinted]] 21 Nov. 1907 Dear Mr. True, I am glad the fragments prove Gibbes's species and hope you will be able to get some interesting notes together for publication. Yours truly Samuel Henshaw Dr. F W. True Washington D.C.
[[Red line]] [[postal mark for Philadelphia PA. 4 - PM Apr 30 1907]] [[postal mark for Washington D.C. - RECD 2 - AM May 1 1907]] [[preprinted]] [[image - Eagle surrounded by words "United States of America]] [[image - Image of President McKinley surrounded by words "Postage One Cent 1843 - McKinley - 1901"]] THE SPACE ABOVE IS RESERVED FOR POSTMARK. POSTAL CARD. THE SPACE BELOW IS FOR THE ADDRESS ONLY. [[/preprinted]] Dr. Frederick W. True, National Museum, Washington, D.C. [[/red line]]
[[stamped with illegible postmark]] 104 South Fifth Street Philadelphia, U. S. A. The American Philosophical Society acknowledges with thanks the receipt of ^[[the following: - "Remarks on the Type of the Fossil Cetacean Agorophius Pygmaeus (Müller).]] Very respectfully yours ^[[I. Minis Hays,]] Librarian^[[, M.]] Philadelphia ^[[April 30/07.]]
[[underlined]] Christ. Univ. [[/underlined]] Prof G. A. Guldberg Dir. Anatomisches Inst. Prof G. A. Dars Dir. Zootom. Inst Prof. R. Collett Dir. Zoologich. Inst
[[in pencil]] Sent Feb 16 [[/in pencil]] 11.12.8 London. S.W. My dear Sir, I should be greatly obliged if you would kindly send me copies of your recent
papers on Cetacea. Yours faithfully B. Lydekker
[[purple stamp]] H.M. | NOV 4 1908 [[/purple stamp]] [[purple stamp]] REGISTER NUMBER | | SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION | RECEIVED NOV 4 1908 | REF. TO ^[[HM]][[/purple stamp]] [[preprinted]] SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM [[line]] MEMORANDUM [[/preprinted]] Nov. 4, 1908 To Mr. Dorsey, Chief Clerk, Smithsonian Institution, If there are any copies of my paper entitled Remarks on the type of the fossil cetacean Agorophius pygmaeus to spare, I shall be obliged if you will have one sent to Dr. Ernest Von Stromer, University of Munich, Munich, Bavaria, Germany. Yours sincerely, ^[[F W True]] ^[[Ordered sent thro' Exch. with req. of author card enclosed]] [[purple stamp]] H.M. | NOV 4 1908 [[/purple stamp]]
Howard J. McDougall Esq. Whale Factory Manager Reuben's Harbour Chaleur Bay Newfoundland [[line across page]] Chas Dowding 45 Rossett Road Blundellsands Liverpool -
[[stamp]] R.R. SEP 23 1907 [[/stamp]] 45 [[Roniff?]] Road, Blundellsands, Liverpool, Sept 12. 1907. Dear Sir, I beg leave to send my warmest thanks to you for the gift of Dr True's monumental work. It arrived some days ago, but I purposely delayed writing, on the instant, in order that I might, at least, look through it first. On page 7 where Beste speaks of: "great whales as they hadde beene porposes", I take it he means as [[underlined]] numerous [[/underlined]] as porposes are wont to be seen in other waters. Dr True was fortunate in going when he did. It was probably about that time that Factories ordered their captains not
[[symbol]] The "Puma", [[strikethrough]] belongs [[/strikethrough]] like the "Lynx", belongs to the "Newfoundland Whaling Co" : But I have not her figures since 1903. She was working in or near "Placentia Bay", this year. to kill more than so many, per week, as they could not deal with the numbers they were bringing in: whilst now, a Mr Howard McDougall wrote to me from Reuben's Harbour Chalens Bay, on July 19th 1907 :- "they are extremely scarce. We have now 32. The "Hemp" (of another Company) has given up, having got 24 fish. The "Cabot" at Balena has got 27 so far. Writing later he mentioned that another ship belonging to the Cape Broyle factory had been laid up, having only got [[underlined]] one [[/underlined]] ! Against this compare: 1903 The "Puma" killed 256 [[symbol]] 1904 The "Lynx" (In past cruise] 170 1905 The "Lynx" 137 1906 The "Lynx" 81 The big figures, at the beginning of the century, "boomed" the
the business : factories were opened right and left: ships got from Norway, as it were by the [[underlined]] gross [[/underlined]]. Most of the factories are closed, and their vessels sold to the Japanese. But I have just come across a note: that in [[underlined]] 1906 [[/underlined]] "[[underlined]] one [[/underlined]] whaler killed 160 whales" : and another note : that of 27 cow whales killed between March and October 1906 only [[underlined]] four [[/underlined]] were in calf. I think this information referred to the Cape Broyle Factory. Mentioning the matter WMe McDougall he remarked that he "thought that would be about the proportion", in his factory too. He promised me precise figures, over the term of years they had been working, but I forgot to remind him again. I remember asking the question on board the "Hawk" of the C. Broyle factory, then lying in $ John's, on learning there was [[underlined]] no legal [[/underlined]] close season, in Newfoundland. I observe that the Newfoundland Administration, though it requires returns from each factory showing (1) number of whales captured (2) how many males; how many females: does not ask : [[strikethrough]] noth [[/strikethrough]] how many in calf, or with calf at foot: & prescribes no close season : but then the ice closes Newfoundland fishing. In [[strikethrough]] England [[/strikethrough]] Scotland, however, there is a close season. By "[[underlined]] An Act to legalate Whale Fisheries in Scotland [[/underlined]]" (passed 28th August [[underlined]] 1907 [[/underlined]]) it is forbidden to kill whales between November 1st and March 31st and further, during "five weeks of the summer herring fishing", under 40 miles from shore. This, of course, is to save the herring fishery from damage.
(2) damage. I glanced through "A Book of Whales" (Progressive Science Series) by F. E. Beddard M.A.F.R.S. John Murray, London & New York (?) : V I think he ventured the suggestion that the period of gestation might be 18 [[insertion ^ mos. [[/insertion]] or more : just as an elephant is long in calf. I found whale fisherman were inclined to this opinion. Ask the increasing scarcity of whale, the "opinion" seems to be that there were "just as many whales as ever", but scattered over the ocean, frightened away by the steam-whalers. The Cook on board the "Lynx", a Norwegian like the rest, said of a whale was hunted from 1 p.m. till 5.30 p.m. and lost in the fog, at last: [[strikethrough]] said [/strikethrough]] : "He hear very good : if he not
hear so good, catch many whale". But [[underlined]] ex hypothesi [[/underlined]] they came to the shallower waters to breed, as turtles come to Bermuda: Where now there are none : but a belated Act is on the local Statute book, forbidding their capture , during the breeding season! All points I think to the early extinction of Whale Fishing in Newfoundland : so as I say, it was well Dr True took time by the forelock. I take it his mission was to [[underlined]] identify whales [[/underlined]], rather than enquire at their habits, so I am not surprised that, so far, I have not come across any dissertation on these. But I have, also not, so far, noticed among osteological data, any reference to
to the "ears", or "legs" : which vary greatly in size. Mr Pitts the manager of the Guano Factory at Reuben's Harbour most kindly gave me three "ears" : not merely the "shell [[insertion]] ^ loose [[/insertion]] : but on the [[strikethrough]] [[irsine?]] [[/strikethrough]] bones which join it to the skull with the portion of this attached. One pair is beautifully white : the third is all there, but not cleaned and boiled white. I have also a pair of legs. I would not have them pared down, lest damage should be done to them as specimens. [[underline]] They [[/underline]] are in the meal. I have just unrolled the parcel to sketch them : and on re-examining them, fear I was too confident [[insertion]] ^ that [[/insertion]] they are un-scathed. I think some of the gristle was cut off. I quite thought I saw nothing but meat and fat trimmed off. [[image - pencil drawing of whale bone]] [[caption]] 13 inches [[/caption]] If there be nothing in the book about "ears" & "legs", I may assume they are of no importance [[underline]] quoad [[/underline]] identification of species. If whale fishing ceases, the cod-fishermen will be pleased; for it is their "opinion" that the whale's appointed function is to drive the cod inshore to be caught: & they blame the Whales for [[insertion]] ^ their own [[/insertion]] recent poor cod seasons. [[insertion]] (By the way this season is said to be good) [[/insertion]] I must apologise for the length of this letter : and would thank you again, [[underlined]] indeed most heartily [[/underlined]], for the magnificent and instructive treatise . The photographs are splendid. Believe me, Dear Sir, Yours most sincerely Charles Dowding R. Rathbun Esq Smithsonian Institute Washington, U.S.A
^[[Monodon?]] [[preprinted]] [[image: Vermont crest with "Vermont Freedom and Unity" written on it]] STATE OF VERMONT OFFICE OF STATE GEOLOGIST BURLINGTON, VT. [[/preprinted]] June 23d. 1908. Dr.F.W. True, Dear Sir: I herewith return the letters which you kindly allowed me to take. May I ask if you can from the photos of the periotic of the Halifax specimen tell me if I am right in calling it the left one and in the Vermont specimen the right? The question arises whether the Halifax whale,if as I believe it to be,is Monodon^[[/]]is monoceros or another species^[[?]] It seems most likely that it is the same as the living speceies Would it enable you to throw any light on this point if I sent the bone itself, periotic, of the Halifax whale to you for direct comparison. I cannot very well ask them to send ^[[^ all]] the bones, tho I think that they would be willin^[[g]] to do so if thereby the place of the specimen could be specifically settled. I do not wish to impose upon your already amply manifested willingness to assist in this matters ^[[&]] hope that you will say no whenever you feel like it. Again thanking you cordially for your help ^[[Yours truly G.H. Perkins]]
June 9, 1909. Dr. W. D. Matthew, American Museum of Natural History, New York. Dear Dr. Matthew:- I have packed the skull and bones of the fossil porpoise from Patagonia, no. 9485, labelled [[underlined]] Argyrocetus [[/underlined]] sp. (=[[underlined]] Diochotichus [[/underlined]]) for return to the American Museum, and hope they will arrive safely. The text of the description is ready and I should like to have the following photographs as illustrations, though of course the number can be cut down if considered too large. You can, of course, decide for yourself what the size of the photographs should be, as you will know where it is to be published. SKULL. (As large as publication will permit.) 1. Upper surface. 3. Side. 2. Lower surface. 4. Rear. ATLAS AND OTHER VERTEBRAE. 5. Anterior surface, 6. Lateral surface. Note. The vertebrae can be set up in a line with interspaces of an inch or so between them, and only two negatives will be necessary. RIBS. 7. Anterior surface.
-2- TYMPANIC BONE. 8. Inner side. 10. Posterior surface. 9. Inferior surface. Note. These should be made natural size. For views wanted see outline sketches below. As I wrote you some time ago one of the rami of the mandible was found to be separated into two pieces when the specimen was unpacked here. I have thought it best not to make the slight repair necessary before returning the specimen, as it would probably part again on the road. I am holding the five little vertebrae which were with this skull, but do not belong to it. They look interesting, and I may be able to make something of them later. Both these and the types of [[underlined]] Zarhachis [[/underlined]] and [[underlined]] Agabelus [[/underlined]] are in my office, and are, of course, subject to recall by the American Museum at any time. I may be able to begin advance work on the North American forms this summer, and shall certainly do so^[[|]]next fall. Thus far my time has been spent in going over the literature, examining type specimens, etc., as I want to get a good, broad foundation for this difficult subject, and not add confusion to that already existing. An official letter returning the [[underlined]] Diochotichus [[/underlined]] skull will be written Dr. Bumpus from the head office. Thanking you for your kindness and considerarion in connection with this material, I am, Yours very sincerely,
SHIPPING NOTICE. [[line]] ^[[March 5]] 190^[[9]] From Department of ^[[Vert Paleont]] ^[[OH/MP]] AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. To ^[[Dr. F.W. True, National Museum Washington D.C.]] [[strikethrough]] Bbls [[/strikethrough]] ^[[1]] Box[[strikethrough]] es Packages Books [[/strikethrough]] Contents (state explicitly) ^[[Fossils (Skull jaws & bones of [[underlined]] Argyrocetus [[/underlined]])]] {Loan {[[strikethrough]] Gift [[/strikethrough]] {[[strikethrough]] Exchange [[/strikethrough]] {[[strikethrough]] Sale [[/strikethrough]] [[strikethrough]] Prepay or [[/strikethrough]] Collect, [[strikethrough]] Freight or [[/strikethrough]] Express ^[[W.D. Matthew]] Curator.
Berkeley, California, October 22, 1908. Dr. F.W. True, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. My dear Dr. True: Please accept my thanks for your recent paper on "[[underlined]] Schizodelphis [[/underlined]]" and "[[underlined]] Priscodelphinus [[/underlined]]", recently received. With kind regards, I am, Yours sincerely, ^[[J.C. Merriam]]
[[image: postal mark from Berkeley, Oct 6, 9-AM, 1908]] [[preprinted]] [[image: Eagle surrounded by words "United States of America]] [[image: Image of President McKinley surrounded by words "Postage One Cent 1843-McKinley-1901"]] THE SPACE ABOVE IS RESERVED FOR POSTMARK. POSTAL CARD. THE SPACE BELOW IS FOR THE ADDRESS ONLY. [[/preprinted]] Dr. F. W. True. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Berkeley, Calif. Oct. 4. 1908 My dear Dr. True, Please accept my thanks for your valued paper on "[[underlined]] Duradon serratus [[/underlined]]" just received. Very Sincerely J.C Merriam
Mesoteras Write Clerk of Court Halifax Halifax Co. N.C. Att [[line]] Huge bone fossil.
[[underlined]] Mesocetus sephuriculus [[/underlined]] Cope. Type. Parnunky R., Va. Amer. Mus. Nat. Hist. Right mandible with condyle lacking. Seven large foramina appear along the outside of the ramus. They are directed forward. A faint alveolar groove. Distal end of the ramus flat, broad and about 3 1/2 in. deep. External surface of ramus very convex. Apparently a high coronoid process. Length of specimen about 4 ft.
^[[fossil whale file]] Princeton University, Princeton,N.J.October 14th, 1909. [[piece of paper attached to sheet]] True, Frederick William, 1858- New genus of fossil cetaceans from Santa Cruz territory, Patagonia, and description of a mandible and vertebrae of prosqualodon. (Part of Smithsonian miscellaneous collections, v. 52. Serial no. 1875.) O. 16p. 3 fig. 3 pls. pa. gratis. (Ag. 7) '09. Smithsonian inst. [[/piece of paper]] ^[[Ansd & recent papers sent Oct 19]] Dr.F.W.True, Washington,D.C. My dear Dr. True:- May I have a copy of your paper on fossil cetaceans from Patagonia? I send some of my separata by this mail. Yours very truly, ^[[Wm J Sinclair]] 7 Evelyn Place, Princeton,N.J.
Robert C. Soper Capt. of a Whaler. Hamilton Hotel.
[[preprinted]] AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 77TH STREET AND CENTRAL PARK WEST NEW YORK DEPARTMENT OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY PROF. HENRY FAIRFIELD OSBORN, CURATOR DR. W. D. MATTHEW, ASSOCIATE CURATOR [[/preprinted]] May 12 1909 D[[superscript]] r [[/superscript]] F. W. True National Museum Washington, D.C. My dear D[[superscript]] r [[/superscript]] True I supposed that I had answered your last letter, but from your note to D[[superscript]] r [[/superscript]] Bumpus it appears that the answer was not written or went astray. We can have the photographs and drawings of the "Argyrocetus" (I forget the proper identification) skull and vertebrae made here if you cannot have them done in Washington, but I suppose it would be better done under your supervision. As President Osborn has approved the publication of the article in our Bulletin, the expense of making the illustration would naturally be charged to us With apologies for the delay I am Very sincerely yours W.D. Matthew
[[two articles cut out of newspaper]] [[first article]] SUNDAY OCTOBER 28 NEW RAILROAD CHARTERED [[line]] Washington, Patuxent River and Drum Point the Line. [[line]] Work of Construction to Be Begun as Soon as Preliminary Surveys Are Completed. [[line]] Special to The Washington Post. Hyattsville, Oct. 27. - Articles of incorporation of the Washington, Patuxent River and Drum Point Railroad Company were filed with the secretary of state at Annapolis to-day. The promoters, represend by Wells & Wells, attorners, propose to immediately begin the construction of a standard gauge, double-track, steam railroad from a point on the existing Chesapeake Beach Railroad, probably at a point near Pindell Station, and from thence to run through Calvert County to Drum Point and Solomons Island, on the Chesapeake Bay, a distance of about thirty miles. The preliminary surveys are now being made, which show that but little filling or grading will be required, and only two or three small bridges required. It is stated that no obstacles will be encountered in securing necessary rights of way. C.A.M. Wells, one of the firm of Wells & Wells, when interviewed to-day concerning the matter declared that while the affairs of the company were practically in a definite shape, they were not sufficiently developed to allow him to announce the names of the officers and those most prominent behind the venture. "Soon we shall have a meeting for a complete organization," declared Mr. Wells, "and I am assured that then there will remain no doubt about our ability and intention to immediately construct and operate this railroad. I have had a rough estimate made of the probable freight and passenger traffic, which is very promising, and an assurance that the road will pay from the start. I find that the people of Calvert County will be earnest and liberal in their support of the venture, and it is my object to enlist their interest, as much as possible, in the enterprise." The promise secured from Secretary of the Navy Bonaparte by Congressman Mudd that he would embody in his annual report a recommendation to Congress for the establishment of a United States naval station at Drum Point, renders the consummation of the scheme highly probable, and with the establishment of such a station, the need of a railroad connection is regarded as imperative. The construction of this road would give the products of the fertile soil of Calvert County accessible markets in Washington, Baltimore, and Philadelphia, and would be an incentive for persons to erect summer residences all along the Patuxent River and Solomons Island. The people now living along the river and this section of the bay are now depending upon inadequate steamboat facilities. [[/first article]] [[second article]] [[line]] PROPOSED NEW ROAD [[line]] Important Bill Introduced in Maryland House at Annapolis. STATEHOUSE, ANNAPOLIS. March 17. - Two bills were last night introduced in the house to incorporate two important transportation companies - the Washington, Patuxent and Drum Point railroad and the Eastern Transportation Company, the latter company being authorized to operate a line of packets and steamboats between Baltimore and points on the Chesapeake bay and its tributaries. The two bills have no connection. The bill to incorporate the railroad company was introduced by Mr. Peach of Prince George and names as incorporators C. A. M. Wells, Joseph R. Owens, Rexford M. Smith, Wallace A. Bartlett and Charles A. Wells of Prince George; Ira J. Baker and Charles C. Mayer of Washington. The company is empowered to construct and operate a railroad from a point on the Chesapeake Beach railroad, in Calvert or Anne Arundel county, east of the Patuxent river, at or near the mouth of the Chesapeake bay, with such lateral branches as may be deemed necessary. The right to condemnation of land is granted. The use of public roads is granted, conditional upon the approval of the commissioners of the several counties. Authority is given to buy land, to own steamships, tugs and barges and to operate same in connection with the railroad. The capital stock is $250,000, divided into 5,000 shares at par value of $50 each. It is said there is sufficient capital pledged to insure the construction of the proposed road. [[/second article]]
[[advertisement cut from newspaper]] FOR SALE - SEASHORE LOTS. [[line]] [[image: sailboat on the water]] OWN A COTTAGE BY THE SEA At Beautiful NORTH CHESAPEAKE BEACH THE COMING CITY ON THE BAY. HEALTH AND PLEASURE RESORT. 40 lots at $35, $40, and $50 each; $2 down, $2 per month. Church, hotel, clubhouse, and 42 houses already built, and many lots sold; 3/4 mile up beach from C. B. R. R. station. Agent on ground. 416 5th st. nw. Room 203. je13-3t
MAP OF ROUTE TO BENEDICT. [[image - map of route between Washington D.C. and Benedict, Maryland, showing towns along route, as well as counties, towns, ports, forts, estates and rivers in surrounding countryside.]]
[[underlined]] Joseph Leidy [[/underlined]] [[strikethrough]] Notice of Some Extinct Cetaceans [[symbol]] Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci., Phila., 1868, 196 - 197. [[underlined]] Hoplocetus obesus Drephinus occiduus [[/underlined]] [[/strikethrough]]
[[blank page]] [[end page]] [[start page]] [[Collection of various anatomical illustrations]]
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[[image - pencil drawing of bone]] nat. size Ear-bone of ? Emmons, Geol. Surv. of N.C., 1858, p. 208, fig. 28. Miocene of Tar River, N.C.
[[image - pencil drawing of bone]] Ear bone of? Emmons, Geol. Surv. of N.C., 1858, p. 209, fig. 29. Miocene of Tar R., N.C.
[[image - pencil drawing of bone]] 1/2 nat. size. Ear-bone of ? Emmons, Geol. Surv. of N.C., 1858, p. 205, fig. 28. Miocene of Tar R., North Carolina.
[[image - pencil drawing of bone]] 1/2 nat.- size Ear-bone of ? Emmons, Geol. Surv. of N.C., 1858, p. 205, fig. 27. Miocene of Tar R., N.C.
[[image - pencil drawing of bone]] 1/2 nat.- size Ear-bone of ? Emmons, Geol. Surv. of N.C., 1858, p. 209, fig. 31 - Miocene of Tar River, N.C.
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Prof. Giovanni Capellini Senatore del Regno Bologna [[strikethrough]] e Porto Venere [[/strikethrough]]
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[[preprinted]] AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 77TH STREET AND CENTRAL PARK WEST NEW YORK DEPARTMENT OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY PROF. HENRY FAIRFIELD OSBORN, CURATOR DR. W. D. MATTHEW, ASSOCIATE CURATOR [[/preprinted]] Aug 26 1909 Ausd Sept 21 Dr. F. W. True National Museum My dear D[[superscript]] r [[/superscript]] True We have been a long time delayed in getting the photos made for your paper, owing to other work having accumulated which had to take precedence, but they are done at last, and I forward them to you herewith. I fear there may be some further delay in the printing, as publication of our Bulletin has been suspended until the end of the year. Your paper was requisitioned for, and should take an early place as soon as publication work is resumed. As you may suppose, we are none of us very cheerful over the hold-up, but it had to be, and we are making the best of it Sincerely yours W.D. Matthew Photos received. Shall I send them? L.S. Aug 30. '09 Ausd Sept 21