National Museum of Natural History (U.S.) Caribbean Coral Reef Ecosystems Program

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Parent Organization

National Museum of Natural History (U.S.)

Description

The Caribbean Coral Reef Ecosystems (CCRE) Program is a long term field site dedicated to investigations of coral reefs and associated mangroves, seagrass meadows, and sandy bottoms. Field operations are based at the Carrie Bow Cay Field Station on the Meso-American Barrier Reef in Belize. Carrie Bow Cay Field Station serves as a permanent site in the Smithsonian's Tenenbaum Marine Observatories Network, a global-scale network of sites which spans latitudes and ocean basins. For over forty years, research at Carrie Bow Cay Field Station has focused on the topography, origin, geological development, and oceanography of the Meos-American Reef and its numerous islands, as well as the biodiversity, evolution, and ecology of its organisms and communities. The Program started in 1972, with a team consisted of Walter H. Adey, Department of Paleobiology, a specialist in fossil and modern coralline algae; Ian G. Macintyre, Paleobiology, a carbonate sedimentologist studying calcification, reef-building organisms, and reef evolution; Arthur L. Dahl, Botany, an algal ecologist; Mary E. Rice, Invertebrate Zoology, an expert in sipunculan worm systematics and developmental biology; Tom Waller, Paleobiology, a malacologist focusing on the systematics and distribution of scallops in time and space; Arnfried Antonius, a postdoctoral fellow in Invertebrate Zoology working on stony corals; and Klaus Ruetzler, Invertebrate Zoology, a sponge biologist with an interest in reef ecology and bioerosion.

Source

  • Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. (2016). "Caribbean Coral Reef Ecosystems Program." Retrieved April 14, 2016 from http://ccre.si.edu/index.html
  • Ruetzler, K. (2008). Caribbean Coral Reef Ecosystems: Thirty-Five Years of Smithsonian Marine Science in Belize. Smithsonian Contributions to the Marine Sciences, Number 38. Retrieved April 14, 2016 from http://ccre.si.edu/docs/CCCRE_history.pdf
  • Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. (2016). "CCRE History." Retrieved April 14, 2016 from http://ccre.si.edu/history.html

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1972

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