Twenty-Six and Blooming!

On this day in 1987, the Enid A. Haupt Garden, named for the American philanthropist and publisher, officially opened to the public. The Haupt garden, which is located adjacent to the Smithsonian Institution Building, sits above a three-story underground complex, known as the Quad, that includes the National Museum of African Art, the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, and the S. Dillon Ripley Center.  A few times a year, the colorful flowers displayed in the garden are changed to reflect the foliage currently in bloom.

Click through the slideshow for photos of construction of the Quad and the Enid A. Haupt Garden!

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Two engineers from the Law Engineering Testing Company conduct a soil boring to obtain samples necessary to plans for the construction of the Quadrangle Building in the South Yard behind the Smithsonian Institution Building, 1979, by Richard K. Hofmesiter, black-and-white photographic print, Record Unit 371 - Office of Public Affairs, The Torch, 1955-1960, 1965-1988, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Neg. no. 79-3471-8.

A photograph of the model of the Quadrangle, a complex of buildings that contain the Sackler Gallery, National Museum of African Art, S. Dillon Ripley Center, and the South Yard behind the Smithsonian Institution Building, or "Castle," and the Arts and Industries Building, c. 1979, color photographic print, Accession 09-161 - Office of Facilities Services, Project Files, 1965-1984, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Neg. no. SIA2011-1345.

Trucks are hauling dirt from the construction site in preparation for the Smithsonian Institution's $73.2 million underground complex on the Quad which includes the National Museum of African Art, the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, and a circular kiosk to the S. Dillon Ripley International Center, c. 1984, by Jeffrey Ploskonka, black-and-white photographic print, Record Unit 410 - Office of Public Affairs, Publicity Records, circa 1965-1974, 1987, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Neg. no. 2004-4100

Looking down from the tallest tower of the Smithsonian Institution Building towards Independence Avenue, view is of the Quadrangle (South Yard) construction site, 1984, by Jeff Tinsley, black-and-white photographic print, Record Unit 371 - Office of Public Affairs, The Torch, 1955-1960, 1965-1988, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Neg. no. SIA2011-1329.

Eighth Smithsonian Secretary (1964-1984) S. Dillon Ripley (1913-2001) inspecting construction at the Quadrangle building site with (from l.), Charles Blitzer, Arthur M. Sackler, founding donor of the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Jill Sackler, and Mary Livingston Ripley, 1984, by Kim Nielsen, black-and-white photographic print, Record Unit 371 - Office of Public Affairs, The Torch, 1955-1960, 1965-1988, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Neg. no. 2004-10339.

On October 15, 1984 (c. 8:30 a.m.), a thick, black smoke surrounded the Smithsonian Institution Building. It was caused by a fire in a tar-melting machine in the bottom of the Quad construction pit., 1984, by Mark Avino, black-and-white photographic print, Record Unit 371 - Office of Public Affairs, The Torch, 1955-1960, 1965-1988, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Neg. no. 84-11864-12A.

One of the first eight trees (lindens and magnolias) for the Enid Haupt Garden at the Quadrangle site being unloaded by crane on November 20, 1985., by Eric Long, black-and-white photographic print, Record Unit 371 - Office of Public Affairs, The Torch, 1955-1960, 1965-1988, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Neg. no. 85-17668-8A.

Looking from the Independence Avenue side of the Quad construction. The floor will eventually be the roof of a 10,000 square foot, two-story high exhibit gallery, 1985, by Jeff Tinsley, black-and-white photographic print, Record Unit 371 - Office of Public Affairs, The Torch, 1955-1960, 1965-1988, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Neg. no. 85-6242-28.

At the end of the three-story high concourse in the Smithsonian Institution's underground complex is an illusionist mural by Richard Haas, 1987, by Robert Lautman, black-and-white photographic print, Record Unit 410 - Office of Public Affairs, Publicity Records, circa 1965-1974, 1987, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Neg. no. 87-6702.

View of Arthur M. Sackler Gallery pavilion with pyramided roof located at the Smithsonian Institution in the four-acre Enid A. Haupt Garden, formerly known as the South Yard, 1987, by Jeff Tinsley, black-and-white photographic print, Record Unit 410 - Office of Public Affairs, Publicity Records, circa 1965-1974, 1987, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Neg. no. 87-7964-23.

Enid A. Haupt (l.) and Lady Bird Johnson in the Enid A. Haupt Garden in the South Yard of the Castle, on their way to a celebration being held for Mrs. Johnson in the Arts and Industries Building, April 24, 1988, in honor of her 75th birthday., 1988, by Richard Strauss, black-and-white photographic print, Record Unit 371 - Office of Public Affairs, The Torch, 1955-1960, 1965-1988, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Neg. no. 88-8669-12.

The Smithsonian Institution Building or "Castle's" south entrance, viewed from Independence Avenue. The Enid A. Haupt Garden in the South Yard welcomes visitors through the gates, 1990, by Jeff Tinsley, color photographic print, Accession 11-009 - Smithsonian Photographic Services, Photographic Collection, 1971-2006, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Neg. no. 90-6258.

Smithsonian Secretary S. Dillon Ripley sitting on roof of building across from South Yard, 1987, color photographic print, Record Unit 7008 - Sidney Dillon Ripley Papers, 1913-1993, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Neg. no. SIA2007-0157.

Aerial view from the southwest of the Smithsonian Institution Building, Freer Gallery of Art, Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, National Museum of African Art, Arts and Industries Building and Enid A. Haupt Garden, 1993, by Jeff Tinsley, color photographic print, Accession 11-009 - Smithsonian Photographic Services, Photographic Collection, 1971-2006, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Neg. no. 2002-724.

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