SIA RU009591, Henson, Pamela M, Oral history interviews with S. Dillon Ripley 1977-1993

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Summary

Creator:
Henson, Pamela M
Title:
Oral history interviews with S. Dillon Ripley 1977-1993
Dates:
1977, 1977-1993
Notes:
S. Dillon Ripley (1913- 2001), ornithologist and eighth Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, developed an interest in natural history in his youth. He received the B.A. from Harvard University in 1936 and the Ph.D. from Yale University in 1943. From 1946 to 1963, he was on the faculty of Yale University and served as Director of their Peabody Museum from 1959 to 1963. In 1964, he was appointed Secretary of the Smithsonian. During his twenty year tenure as Secretary, he oversaw the development of the Anacostia Museum, Cooper-Hewitt Museum, Festival of American Folklife, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, National Air and Space Museum, National Museum of African Art, Renwick Gallery, Arthur M. Sackler Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Associates, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, and Smithsonian magazine. Ripley was also involved in numerous conservation organizations, including the Charles Darwin Foundation for the Galapagos Islands, International Council for Bird Preservation, and International Union for the Conservation of Nature. His interests in international affairs also led him to play a role in the foundation of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
Summary:
These interviews of Ripley by Pamela M. Henson cover his youth, early interests in natural history, education, career on the faculty at Yale, field work and expeditions, tenure as Secretary of the Smithsonian, involvement in international conservation efforts, and reminiscences of individuals, including Salim Ali, August Heckscher, Joseph H. Hirshhorn, G. Evelyn Hutchinson, and Ralph Rinzler
Restrictions:
Restricted
Topics:
Ornithology, Art, Aeronautics, Conservation of natural resources, Folklife studies, Natural history, Museum techniques
Subjects:
Ali, Sálim 1896-1987, Hirshhorn, Joseph H, Hutchinson, G. Evelyn (George Evelyn) 1903-1991, Rinzler, Ralph, Ripley, Sidney Dillon 1913-2001, Heckscher, August 1913-1997, Anacostia Museum, Cooper-Hewitt Museum, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, National Air and Space Museum (U.S.), National Museum of African Art (U.S.), Renwick Gallery, Sackler Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Associates, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Charles Darwin Foundation, International Council for Bird Preservation, International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, Yale University, Harvard University, Peabody Museum of Natural History, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Arthur M. Sackler Gallery (Smithsonian Institution), Smithsonian Magazine, Festival of American Folklife
Form/Genre:
Interviews, Collection descriptions, Audiotapes, Oral history
Local Number:
SIA RU009591
Physical Description:
48 audiotapes (Reference copies)

Finding Aids to Oral Histories in the Smithsonian Institution Archives

Record Unit 9591

Ripley, Sidney Dillon, 1913-2001 interviewee

Sidney Dillon Ripley Interviews, 1977-1993

Repository: Smithsonian Institution Archives, Washington, D.C. Contact us at osiaref@si.edu.
Creator: Ripley, Sidney Dillon, 1913-2001 interviewee
Title: Sidney Dillon Ripley Interviews
Dates: 1977-1993
Quantity: 48 audiotapes (Reference copies).
Collection: Record Unit 9591
Language of Materials: English

Historical Note

S. Dillon Ripley (1913-2001), ornithologist and eighth Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, developed an interest in natural history in his youth. He received the B.A. from Harvard University in 1936 and the Ph.D. from Yale University in 1943. He served briefly as a curator of birds at the National Museum of Natural History before joining the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. From 1946 to 1963, he was on the faculty of Yale University and served as Director of their Peabody Museum from 1959 to 1963. In 1964, he was appointed Secretary of the Smithsonian. During his twenty year tenure as Secretary, he oversaw the development of the Anacostia Museum, Cooper-Hewitt Museum, Festival of American Folklife, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, National Air and Space Museum, National Museum of African Art, Renwick Gallery, Arthur M. Sackler Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Associates, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, and Smithsonian magazine. Ripley was also involved in numerous conservation organizations, including the Charles Darwin Foundation for the Galapagos Islands, International Council for Bird Preservation, and International Union for the Conservation of Nature. His interests in international affairs also led him to play a role in the foundation of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

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Introduction

The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

S. Dillon Ripley was interviewed for the Oral History Collection because of his role as an ornithologist and as the eighth Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution from 1964 to 1984.

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Descriptive Entry

Ripley was interviewed by Pamela M. Henson from 1977 to 1993 at his offices at the Smithsonian and at his home in Litchfield, Connecticut. These interviews cover his youth, early interests in natural history, education, career on the faculty at Yale, field work and expeditions, tenure as Secretary of the Smithsonian, involvement in international conservation efforts, and reminiscences of individuals, including Salim Ali, August Heckscher, Joseph H. Hirshhorn, G. Evelyn Hutchinson, and Ralph Rinzler. The collection consists of 38.5 hours of audiotape recording, circa 831 pages of transcript, and occupies 1.0 linear feet of shelf space. In total, this collection includes 35 original 5" reel-to-reel audiotapes, 18 original 7" reel-to-reel audiotapes, 18 preservation 7" reel-to-reel audiotapes, and 48 reference audiotape cassettes.

Restrictions: The recordings and transcripts of the S. Dillon Ripley Interviews cannot be used without the permission of his executor.

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Use Restriction

Restricted.

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Preferred Citation

Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9591, Ripley, Sidney Dillon, 1913-2001 interviewee, Sidney Dillon Ripley Interviews

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Container List

Box 1

Interview 1: 24 June 1977:

Box 1 of 3
Interview covers his youth in New York City; reminiscences of immediate family; education at Montessori kindergarten, Noble & Greenough School, Rivers School, and Fay School; move to Cambridge, Massachusetts; memories of World War I; summers in Litchfield, Connecticut at Kilvarock; and early bird walks, 1913-1924.
Transcript, pp. 1-19, of audiotape recording, 1.0 hour.

Interview 2: 30 September 1977:

Box 1 of 3
Interview covers his friendship with the Goddards and John R. Mott, Jr.; entry into St. Paul's School and headmaster Dr. Samuel S. Drury; trip to India via the liner France, including his stay in Egypt, seeing a snake charmer, trip on the Mantua, arrival in Bombay, and the Taj Mahal Hotel, 1926.
Transcript, pp. 20-40, of audiotape recording, 1.0 hour.

Interview 3: 6 December 1977:

Box 1 of 3
Interview continues his discussion of his trip to India including arrival in Bombay, Maharajah of Indore story, visit to Calcutta, tiger hunt, Nagpur, daily life of the British, Delhi train trip, Rajputan, Rajput history, Muslim Hindu differences, visits to Agra, Taj Mahal, Fatipur, Akbar, and Darjeeling, camping overnight, contrasts of Delhi and New Delhi, visit to relatives, Tibetan New Year celebration, and idea for trip to Kashmir that included houseboats, the Biddulphs, Del Lake, and Shalimar gardens; trip to Tibet, by Ripley and his younger sister, including travels through passes, Leh, Colonel Holmes, monasteries, tea bowls, the Hemis, monastery near border, and Hemis monastery 21 year cycle ceremony, 1927.
Transcript, pp. 41-76, of audiotape recording, 1.5 hours.

Interview 4: 3 January 1978:

Box 1 of 3
Interview traces his trek to Ladakh, including the Hemis monastery 21 year cycle ceremony; trek back to India and illness; visit to Kashmir; voyage back to the United States on the Lloyd Line Italiano and Berengaria; his return to St. Paul's School, including riding and farming, birding with friend Hugh Birckhead, the duck pond, Offal Eating Club, writing, debating and drama career plans, and the influence of Headmaster Drury, 1927-1932.
Transcript, pp. 77-99, of audiotape recording, 1.0 hour.

Interview 5: 6 March 1978:

Box 1 of 3
Interview covers his graduation from St. Paul's School; his Yale years, including interests, professors, roommates, Leonard Sanford and ornithology, G. Evelyn Hutchinson and ecology, fencing, drama and criticism, and effects of the Great Depression; graduation and job prospects; graduate school at Columbia University in zoology; and invitation from the Crocketts to participate in a South Seas expedition, 1932-1936.
Transcript, pp. 100-121, of audiotape recording, 1.0 hour.

Interview 6: 18 April 1978:

Box 1 of 3
Interview discusses his family home in Litchfield, Connecticut, and creation of a duck pond; influences on Ripley including F.C. Walcott and the Whites; family history; sister Julie's marriage and their establishment of the Forman School; sister Connie's marriage and the antique business; brother Louis' business and farm interests, his marriage and loss of son; fire at the family home, Kilvarock, in Litchfield; his trip to European trip with Dallas Bache Pratt, including visit to Venice and meeting Princess Sanfastino, a Dalmatian cruise and side trips, visit to St. Moritz and the high life, 1932-1936.
Transcript, pp. 122-144, of audiotape recording, 1.0 hour.

Interview 7: 6 November 1978:

Box 1 of 3
Interview covers Litchfield Tercentenary; his work at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City; preparations for his first major scientific expedition, especially advice from Ernst Mayr and Frank M. Chapman; Denison-Crockett Expedition to New Guinea, including the voyage of the Chiva, visits enroute to Barro Colorado Island in Panama and the Galapagos Islands, readings such as Charles Darwin and Alfred Russell Wallace, meeting with the George Vanderbilt expedition, skills learned for inland excursions, and reminiscences of Charis Crockett and local people, 1936-1937.
Transcript, pp. 145-170, of audiotape recording, 1.0 hour.

Interview 8: 27 December 1978:

Box 1 of 3
Interview continues his reminiscences of the Denison-Crockett Expedition to the South Seas, including the return voyage with animals, loss of babiduri, a visit from his mother, Constance Baillie Ripley, malaria, and a visit to Bali; volunteer work at American Museum of Natural History after his return; participation in the Vanderbilt Expedition to Sumatra, including a trip to Medan, the Medan zoo, orangutans and tigers, outfitting the expedition, climbing Mount Leuser, Mrs. Vanderbilt's illness, his vacation on Nias, voyage back on Tatsuta Maru via Shanghai and Tokyo, visits with Japanese colleagues, and return to California, 1938-1940.
Transcript, pp. 171-201, of audiotape recording, 1.5 hours.

Interview 9: 21 June 1979:

Box 1 of 3
Interview focuses on his return from Sumatra in 1939; illness; museum work at American Museum of Natural History in New York City and the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia; interaction with Thomas Barbour, Andrews and Cadwallader; Harvard University doctoral work; 1942 job offer from Smithsonian Secretary Alexander Wetmore to work at the United States National Museum and his research there; outbreak of World War II; his views on museum systematics; and pets including Eduardo and cockatua, 1939-1942.
Transcript, pp. 202-243, of audiotape recording, 1.5 hours.

Interview 10: 17 October 1979:

Box 1 of 3
Interview looks back at his European trip with family when Ripley was ten years old, including tours of Italy, France, Austria, England, and Scotland, 1923-1924.
Transcript, pp. 244-255, of audiotape recording, 0.5 hour.

Interview 11: 26 February 1980:

Box 1 of 3
Interview includes his observations of the Japanese in New Guinea and Japan; his work at the American Museum of Natural History and Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia; his application to Naval Intelligence; completion of his doctoral work at Harvard, and job as curator of birds at the United States National Museum; wartime work with the Bureau of Economic Warfare and Coordinator of Information (COI), including his role as COI British liaison in New York City; involvement with the East Indies Institute and contacts; publishing and lecturing; and work for the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), including trip to Egypt and India, 1937-1943.
Transcript, pp. 256-283, of audiotape recording, 1.0 hour.

Interview 12: 7 October 1980:

Box 1 of 3
Interview covers his relationship with his father during the 1940s; Hadley and Louis XIV campaign on River IJssel; friendship with Lefty Lewis, especially book collecting; Yale Corporation; and duties for OSS, 1940s.
Transcript, pp. 284-302, of audiotape recording, 1.0 hour.

Interview 13: 9 December 1980:

Box 1 of 3
Interview focuses on his pre war involvement with the East Indies Institute; the Ethnogeographic Board; the Coordinator of Information; OSS training and travel through Egypt, and arrival in Delhi prior to establishment of the South East Asia Command (SEAC), 1941-1942.
Transcript, pp. 303-322, of audiotape recording, 0.5 hour.

Interview 14: 22 December 1980:

Box 1 of 3
Interview discusses SEAC command in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), including early days at the Galle Face Hotel, reminiscences of Robert Buell, consul general, gem collecting in Ceylon, early friendships with British alreadyion Ceylon, setting up headquarters at Kandy, General Stilwell's visit, and Tai Li's visit, 1943-1945.
Transcript, pp. 323-345, of audiotape recording, 1.0 hour.

Interview 15: 8 April 1981:

Box 1 of 3
Interview focuses on his role with the OSS in Ceylon, including his work as liaison officer with the British, trip to Agra and meeting with General Philip Christison, recollections of Lord Mountbatten, work on special Intelligence operations, and his perceptions of political situation in Southeast Asia, 1943-1945.
Transcript, pp. 345-379, of audiotape recording, 1.5 hours.

Interview 16: 24 June 1981:

Box 1 of 3
Interview recounts his mission to Thailand, including the plane trip, the Palace of the Roses, and radio skits, 1945.
Transcript, pp. 380-389, of audiotape recording, 0.5 hour.

Interview 17: 3 March 1982:

Box 1 of 3
Interview discusses his Thailand mission in August of 1945; Japanese surrender and peace arrangements; Cold War politics; natural history collecting in Ceylon during World War II; his post war career decisions that led him to become a professor and curator at Yale University; marriage to Mary Moncrieffe Livingston; work on ornithological book collection; and expedition to the Naga Hills, India, in 1950, 1945-1950.
Transcript, pp. 390-444, of audiotape recording, 2.0 hours.

Interview 18: 18 May 1982:

Box 1 of 3
Interview focuses on his work as a systematic biologist, especially his views on systematics research and evolutionary theory, biogeography and evolution, influence of Ernst Mayr, Bernhard Rensch and G. Evelyn Hutchinson, behavioral studies of Konrad Lorenz and Oskar Heinroth, population genetics, the work of Theodosius Dobzhansky, Sewell Wright and Lee Dice, research for his doctoral thesis, systematics at Unite States National Museum during the 1940s, and Ripleys work with Salim Ali on The Birds of India project, 1940s-1960s.
Transcript, pp. 445-467, of audiotape recording, 1.0 hour.

Interview 19: 10 May 1983:

Box 1 of 3
Interview recounts his expedition to the Moluccas in 1954; his career at Yale University and the Peabody Museum, including early committee and development work for the museum, William R. Coe and other donors, his role as director of the Peabody Museum, including his appointment and his innovations in public outreach, such as the Museum Associates, the Verrill Medal, new exhibits, and the opening of the King Tut exhibit, 1950-1964.
Transcript, pp. 468-495, of audiotape recording, 1.5 hours.

Interview 20: 1 July 1983:

Box 1 of 3
Interview covers his reminiscences of his Great Aunt Cora and Uncle Charles, 1920-1930; his role as director of the Peabody Museum, especially development of the Associates from the Women's Committee, stimulus to curatorial research productivity by publishing about their research in the Postilla newsletter and Ripleys emphasis on publication, 195-19 64.
Transcript, pp. 495-517, of audiotape recording, 1.0 hour.

Box 2

Interview 21: 5 July 1983:

Box 2 of 3
Interview discusses his participation on in the New Guinea Expedition of 1960, following an International Council of Bird Preservation special meeting in Japan, his trips to Bodim and Ilage Valley, and observations of tribal customs, 1960.
Transcript, pp. 518-547, of audiotape recording, 1.5 hours.

Interview 22: 11 January 1984:

Box 2 of 3
Interview continues his discussion of the New Guinea Expedition of 1960, including birds collected and subsequent publications, as well as changes in international field work; covers the combined ornithological congresses of 1962 the International Council for Bird Preservation and International Ornithological Committee; talks with Crawford Greenewalt at Cornell University, World Wildlife Fund formation; Smithsonian Secretary Leonard Carmichael's pending retirement; changes at Yale following Alfred W. Griswold's death, Ripleys selection as the eighth Smithsonian Secretary, family views on decision, and meeting with Leverette Saltonstall, 1960-1963.
Transcript, pp. 548-575, of audiotape recording, 1.0 hour.

Interview 23: 4 April 1984:

Box 2 of 3
Interview covers his transition from Yale to the Smithsonian, the Audubon eagle painting, first impressions of staff, hiring of Phil Ritterbush, and plans for a music room at the Museum of History and Technology, 1963-1964.
Transcript, pp. 576-598, of audiotape recording, 1.0 hour.

Interview 24: 23 January 1985:

Box 2 of 3
Interview ranges over his early art interests, especially the New York City art scene, his mothers role on the board of the Museum of Modern Art, his own collection, life in New York City, including the Century Club and Boone and Crockett Club, as well as the 1962 meeting in New York of the International Council for Bird Preservation, 1920-1963.
Transcript, pp. 599-612, of audiotape recording, 0.5 hour.

Interview 25: 3 June 1985:

Box 2 of 3
Interview continues to discuss Ripleys art interests, including his program to develop the art side of the Smithsonian; background to the National Collection of Fine Arts (NCFA), including the 1930s National Gallery of Art legislation and its relationship to the NCFA, operation of the NCFA Commission under the conservative Paul Manship; Ripley's search for a modern art collection, his courting of art collector Joseph H. Hirshhorn, using his contacts with Roger Stevens and Mrs. Verner Reed, and his plans with Hirshhorn for a museum for the American people; the role of Smithsonian Regent John Nicholas Brown as the only Regent interested in modern art, and discussions with Lefty Lewis and Brown about the newly established National Portrait Gallery (NPG), 1935-1970. Interview also focuses on the Cooper-Hewitt, the National Design Museum, including the Committee to Save the Cooper Union, the role of Harry DuPont and John Nicholas Brown, the commission report, discussions of federal versus private issues, and questions about the new museum from Senator Claiborne Pell, 1963-1968.
Transcript, pp. 613-624, of audiotape recording, 0.5 hour.

Interview 26: 14 March 1986:

Box 2 of 3
Interview focuses on the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden (HMSG), including negotiations for the Hirshhorn, White House and Congressional assistance, selection of a site where the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology was located, selection of an architect for the new museum, reaction of John Walker of the National Gallery of Art, General Services Administration and Public Building Service problems with Piracci Construction, and opposition to the museum from Gilmore Clark and Sherman Lee. Interview then turns to the Smithsonian Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) and the retirement of director Annemarie Pope; connections to Agnes Meyer; and the NCFA, including opposition to the HMSG by NCFA director David Scott and planning for NCFAs future, 1964-1970.
Transcript, pp. 625-650, of audiotape recording, 1.0 hour.

Interview 27: 22 May 1986:

Box 2 of 3
Interview continues the discussion of Smithsonian art museums, including the Fine Arts and Portrait Gallery opening in 1968; NPG planning by Charles Nagel and Victor Proetz; NCFA planning by David Scott with emphasis on modern art; restoration of the Lincoln Gallery; staff issues at NCFA, the Hiram Powers studio acquisition, resignation of David Scott, and reaction by Frank Getlein. Interview covers Robert Hilton Simmons, who had an African Art museum background, worked on the Henry O. Tanner exhibit at NCFA, and his views on proper role of SI and SI administrators; early controversies relating to the Man and Beast symposium dinner, Benjamin West painting, and criticisms of the HMSG donation, 1964-1970.
Transcript, pp. 651-664, of audiotape recording, 1.0 hour.

Interview 28: 24 September 1986:

Box 2 of 3
Interview continues discussion of Smithsonian art museums, including NCFA, directors David Scott and Joshua Taylor, program for NCFA, including regionalism and religious motifs, squabbles between Taylor and NPG director Marvin Sadik over use of the Fine Art & Portrait Galleries, Archives of American Art acquisition, NCFA and NPG commissions; National Gallery of Art's relations with the Smithsonian, including East Wing planning and Ripleys role on NGA board; creation of the Renwick Gallery of Art, including roles of William Walton of Fine Arts Commission, Libby Roe plans for building for National Capital Planning Commission, White House staff Harry McPherson and Douglass Cater, President Lyndon Baines Johnsons support and visit to building, concept of the Renwick as an extension of Blair House, GSA budget problems, and decrease in White House use of Blair House; and closes with a discussion of President Richard M. Nixon and advice on a planned sea level canal, 1964-1980.
Transcript, pp. 665-671, of audiotape recording, 1.0 hour.

Interview 29: 16 October 1986:

Box 2 of 3
Interview continues discussion of Smithsonian art museums, including Renwick Gallery of Art, notably physical problems with exterior, selection of curator/director, proposals for the gallery as a mini-Smithsonian or Washington, D.C., museum or decorative arts museum, delays in opening, staffing the new museum, role of NCFA director Joshua Taylor, budget problems and continuing White House support; name change from NCFA to the National Museum of American Art; and 1972 Inaugural Ball, 1965-1968.
Transcript, pp. 672-686, of audiotape recording, 0.5 hour.

Interview 30: 19 March 1987:

Box 2 of 3
Interview focuses on the Hillwood Museum, donated to the Smithsonian by Marjorie Merriweather Post, including Ripleys relations with Mrs. Post from Palm Beach, her decorative arts collection from Russia in the 1930s, relationship of Secretary Carmichael and the Board of Regents with Mrs. Post, discussions of transfer of Hillwood to Smithsonian before Ripley arrived, role of Richard Howland with the museum and Marvin Ross as curator; focus of the museum as a window on how American aristocracy lived; James C. Bradley and Richard Ault concerns over high cost of maintaining the museum in accordance with Mrs. Posts gift; return of the museum to the Post family, including role of Mrs. Riggs; Ripleys memories of Mrs. Posts house at Saranac Lake, New York, and retention of her gem collection at the National Museum of Natural History, 1960-1980.
Transcript, pp. 687-701, of audiotape recording, 1.0 hour.

Interview 31: 23 December 1987:

Box 2 of 3
Interview discusses the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (ANM), including meetings with Charles Blitzer concerning lack of interest in Smithsonian by Washington, D.C., African American community; concerns that exhibits like A Nation of Nations at the National Museum of History and Technology should include all immigrants, not just Atlantic migration; Ellis Island as important symbol; the ghetto smell project with United States Time Company; planning begun in 1966 for a museum in rundown neighborhood, influence of Thomas Hoving, of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Harlem on My Mind
Transcript, pp. 702-714, of audiotape recording, 0.5 hour.

Interview 32: 11 January 1988:

Box 2 of 3
Interview continues with the history of the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, including its role as a showcase for Smithsonian in an African American community, goals to reflect and meet needs of a local, stable African American community, move by Director John Kinard towards art, not science or history; how neighborhood museum idea did take off; impact of riots in Washington, D.C., and the March on Washington in 1968, when Ripley opened Smithsonian museums to marchers and provided entertainment, trained guards to handle gently; anti-war marches on Washington, D.C., impact of riots near the National Mall during the Festival of American Folklife; role of Kinard in stopping attack outside the museum, and Ripleys observation that the success of ANM is quiet, but perhaps too quiet, 1966-1980, pp. 715-733, of audiotape recording, 0.5 hour.

Interview 33: 20 May 1988:

Box 2 of 3
Interview completes discussion of the ANM, including ANM successes and failures; ANM relations with Smithsonian, plans for a museum of black culture, plans for a museum of the Americas, plans for a museum of the American Indian and Ripleys designs for a Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (WWICS) building near Federal Triangle, 1964-1980.
Transcript, pp. 734-746, of audiotape recording, 0.5 hour.

Interview 34: 7 July 1988:

Box 2 of 3
Interview focuses on the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, conception and planning, legislation, Ripley report, search for space for WWICS, and the role of WWICS Trustees, 1964- 1980.
Transcript, pp. 747-773, of audiotape recording, 1.0 hour.

Interview 35: 8 July 1988:

Box 2 of 3
Interview covers the Festival of American Folklife, how it developed, the roles of Ralph C. Rinzler, James Morris and others, the 1976 Bicentennial Festival, creation of a Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, Aditi Festival of India, in India, Washington, D.C., and New York City, and the Golden Eye Foundation, 1972-1983.
Transcript, pp. 774-820, of audiotape recording, 2.0 hours.

Interview 36: 8 January 1991:

Box 2 of 3
Interview covers Conservation of the Island of Aldabra in the Indian Ocean, work with military and conservation groups, and establishment of the foundation, 1964-1983.
Transcript, pp. 821-831, of audiotape recording, 0.5 hour.

Interview 37: 1 April 1993:

Box 2 of 3
Interview begins a discussion of Ripleys role in the Charles Darwin Foundation for the Galapagos Islands, including his visit to the islands on his 1937 Crockett Expedition, a visit to Barro Colorado Island in the Panama Canal enroute, and birds observed on the ship, including rare petrels, 1930s-1980s.
No transcript available of audiotape recording, 1.0 hour.

Interview 38: 17 May 1993:

Box 2 of 3
Interview includes reflections on the selection and role of Smithsonian Secretaries, especially the tenure of Samuel Pierpont Langley, the third Secretary from 1887 to 1906, 1860s-1980s.
No transcript available of audiotape recording, 0.5 hour.

Interview 39: 20 May 1993:

Box 2 of 3
Interview continues discussion of his work with the Charles Darwin Foundation for the Galapagos Islands, especially during the 1930s and 1950s, and the resolutions that led to the creation of the Foundation, 1930s-1950s.
No transcript available of audiotape recording, 0.5 hour.

Interview 40: 25 May 1993:

Box 2 of 3
Interview completed discussion of the Charles Darwin Foundation for the Galapagos Islands and his role in international conservation, 1930s-1993.
No transcript available of audiotape recording, 0.5 hour.

Box 3

Audio Recordings of Interviews

Interview 1: 24 June 1977:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.0 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotape
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 2: 30 September 1977:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.0 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotape
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 3: 6 December 1977:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.5 hours
Original Masters: 2 5 reel-to-reel audiotapes
Reference Copies: 2 cassette audiotapes.

Interview 4: 3 January 1978:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.0 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotape
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 5: 6 March 1978:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.0 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotape
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 6: 18 April 1978:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.0 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotape
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 7: 6 November 1978:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.0 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotape
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 8: 27 December 1978:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.5 hours
Original Masters: 2 5 reel-to-reel audiotapes
Reference Copies: 2 cassette audiotapes.

Interview 9: 21 June 1979:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.5 hours
Original Masters: 2 5 reel-to-reel audiotapes
Reference Copies: 2 cassette audiotapes.

Interview 10: 17 October 1979:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 0.5 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotapes
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 11: 26 February 1980:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.0 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotape
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 12: 7 October 1980:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.0 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotape
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 13: 9 December 1980:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 0.5 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotapes
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 14: 22 December 1980:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.0 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotape
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 15: 8 April 1981:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.5 hours
Original Masters: 2 5 reel-to-reel audiotapes
Reference Copies: 2 cassette audiotapes.

Interview 16: 24 June 1981:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 0.5 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotapes
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 17: 3 March 1982:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 2.0 hours
Original Masters: 2 5 reel-to-reel audiotapes
Reference Copies: 2 cassette audiotapes.

Interview 18: 18 May 1982:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.0 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotape
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 19: 10 May 1983:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.5 hours
Original Masters: 2 5 reel-to-reel audiotapes
Reference Copies: 2 cassette audiotapes.

Interview 20: 1 July 1983:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.0 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotape
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 21: 5 July 1983:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.5 hours
Original Masters: 2 5 reel-to-reel audiotapes
Reference Copies: 2 cassette audiotapes.

Interview 22: 11 January 1984:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.0 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotape
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 23: 4 April 1984:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.0 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotape
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 24: 23 January 1985:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 0.5 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotapes
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 25: 3 June 1985:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 0.5 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotapes
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 26: 14 March 1986:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.0 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotape
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 27: 22 May 1986:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.0 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotape
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 28: 24 September 1986:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.0 hour
Original Masters: 1 5 reel-to-reel audiotape
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape.

Interview 29: 16 October 1986:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 0.5 hour
Original Masters: 1 7 reel-to-reel audiotape
Preservation Masters: 1 7" reel-to-reel analog audiotape; 1 digital .wav file
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape; 1 digital .mp3 file.

Interview 30: 19 March 1987:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.0 hour
Original Masters: 2 7 reel-to-reel audiotapes
Preservation Masters: 1 7" and 1 7 low-torque analog reel-to-reel audiotapes; 2 digital .wav files
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape; 2 digital .mp3 files.

Interview 31: 23 December 1987:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 0.5 hour
Original Masters: 1 7 reel-to-reel audiotape
Preservation Masters: 1 7" reel-to-reel analog audiotape; 1 digital .wav file
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape; 1 digital .mp3 file.

Interview 32: 11 January 1988:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 0.5 hour
Original Masters: 1 7 reel-to-reel audiotape
Preservation Masters: 1 7" reel-to-reel analog audiotape; 1 digital .wav file
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape; 1 digital .mp3 file.

Interview 33: 20 May 1988:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 0.5 hour
Original Masters: 1 7 reel-to-reel audiotape
Preservation Masters: 1 7" reel-to-reel analog audiotape; 1 digital .wav file
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape; 1 digital .mp3 file.

Interview 34: 7 July 1988:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.0 hour
Original Masters: 2 7 reel-to-reel audiotapes
Preservation Masters: 2 7" reel-to-reel analog audiotapes; 2 digital .wav files
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape; 2 digital .mp3 files.

Interview 35: 8 July 1988:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 2.0 hours
Original Masters: 4 7 reel-to-reel audiotapes
Preservation Masters: 4 7" reel-to-reel analog audiotapes; 4 digital .wav files
Reference Copies: 2 cassette audiotapes; 4 digital .mp3 files.

Interview 36: 8 January 1991:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 0.5 hour
Original Masters: 1 7 reel-to-reel audiotape
Preservation Masters: 1 7" reel-to-reel analog audiotape; 1 digital .wav file
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape; 1 digital .mp3 file.

Interview 37: 1 April 1993:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 1.0 hour
Original Masters: 2 7 reel-to-reel audiotapes
Preservation Masters: 2 7" reel-to-reel analog audiotapes; 2 digital .wav files
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape; 2 digital .mp3 files.

Interview 38: 17 May 1993:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 0.5 hour
Original Masters: 1 7 reel-to-reel audiotape
Preservation Masters: 1 7" reel-to-reel analog audiotape; 1 digital .wav file
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape; 1 digital .mp3 file.

Interview 39: 20 May 1993:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 0.5 hour
Original Masters: 1 7 reel-to-reel audiotape
Preservation Masters: 2 7" reel-to-reel analog audiotape; 1 digital .wav file
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape; 1 digital .mp3 file.

Interview 40: 25 May 1993:

Box 3 of 3
Total Recording Time: 0.5 hour
Original Masters: 1 7 reel-to-reel audiotape
Preservation Masters: 1 7" reel-to-reel analog audiotape; 1 digital .wav file
Reference Copies: 1 cassette audiotape; 1 digital .mp3 file.

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